Dave Wolverton

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Dave Wolverton
Wolverton in 2007
Wolverton in 2007
BornJohn David Wolverton
(1957-05-28)May 28, 1957
Springfield, Oregon, U.S.
DiedJanuary 14, 2022(2022-01-14) (aged 64)
St. George, Utah, U.S.
Resting placeTonaquint Cemetery, St. George, Utah
Pen nameDavid Farland
OccupationWriter, writing teacher
Alma materBrigham Young University
Period1985–2022
GenreScience fiction, fantasy, historical fiction
Notable works
Website
www.davidfarland.com

John David Wolverton (May 28, 1957 – January 14, 2022), better known by his pen names Dave Wolverton and David Farland, was an American author, editor, and instructor of online writing workshops and groups. He wrote in several genres but was known best for his science fiction and fantasy works. Books in his Runelords series hit the New York Times bestsellers list.

In 1987, he won the Writers of the Future contest. He has been nominated for a Nebula Award and a Hugo Award. He died in the early morning hours of January 14, 2022. He lived in St. George, Utah, with his wife at the time of his death.

Life and career[edit]

Wolverton was born May 28, 1957,[n 1] in Springfield, Oregon to Jack and Lola Jean Wolverton.[1][2] His family moved to a farm in Monroe when he was six years old, where he grew up and graduated from Monroe High School. Following graduation, he served a volunteer mission in Illinois for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[1] Afterward, he attended Ricks College before transferring to Brigham Young University. He met his wife, Mary, there, and they married in the Provo Utah Temple on June 22, 1985. He and his wife had two daughters and three sons.[1]

He began writing in 1985 during college,[3] publishing the short story "The Sky Is an Open Highway" in the fall 1985 issue of The Leading Edge.[2][4] Following that, he entered short stories into various contests, eventually winning first place in the 1987 Writers of the Future contest with the novella "On My Way to Paradise".[2] The story was expanded into the novel of the same name, published in 1989 through Bantam Spectra.[2] The novel was nominated for multiple awards, including the Philip K. Dick Award for "Best Novel in the English Language".[4][5]

He became a judge for the Writers of the Future contest in 1991 and was the Coordinating Judge and Editor at the time of his death.[3][6] After co-editing volume 8 with Algis Budrys in 1992, he took over editing of the annual anthology from volume 9 until volume 14 before passing the role back to Algis Budrys.[7] Wolverton again took over editing the anthology from K. D. Wentworth, beginning with volume 29 and continuing through volume 37.[7]

His historical novel, In the Company of Angels, won the 2009 Whitney Award for best novel of the year, and was a finalist in the best historical novel category.[8][9] Wolverton also received an outstanding achievement award at the 2009 Whitneys.[10] In 2012, his young adult fantasy thriller Nightingale won the International Book Award for best Young Adult Novel of the Year,[11] the Grand Prize at the Hollywood Book Festival,[12] and the Southern California Book Festival for Best Young Adult Novel.[13] It was also a finalist in the Global Ebook Awards.[14] He has been nominated for other awards, including the Nebula Award in the Best Novelette category for his short story "After a Lean Winter".[2]

In the summer of 1998, Dave Wolverton broke the world record for the largest single author book signing which he achieved with A Very Strange Trip, a book he wrote based on a story by L. Ron Hubbard. He wrote under his own name at the beginning of his career, changing to the pseudonym David Farland in the mid-1990s with the release of the first Runelords book.[1]

Wolverton worked as an English professor of creative writing at Brigham Young University from 1999–2002,[1] and held writing workshops for aspiring and established writers.[2] The creative writing class he taught at BYU was taken over by one of his former students, Brandon Sanderson.[15] He taught other writers such as Brandon Mull, Jessica Day George, Eric Flint, Stephenie Meyer, James Dashner, as well as others.[16][17][18]

He worked in the gaming industry and greenlit screenplays in Hollywood. In 1998, Wolverton started working part-time at Saffire Studios, helping create video games. He was responsible for the concept of "lurkers" in the well-known RTS (Real-time strategy) game Starcraft: Brood War. In 2002, he began working as a movie producer and also greenlighted movies.[17][19] He was working on a film adaptation of his Runelords series.[20]

On January 13, 2022, Wolverton suffered from a fall, resulting in a severe head injury and a hemorrhagic stroke.[2][17] He was on life support until he died early the next morning at the age of 64 in St. George, Utah.[4][18][21][22][23] He was buried in the Tonaquint Cemetery in St. George, Utah.[1] At the time of his death he was known to be working on three books: A rewrite of 2012's Nightingale, Runelords: Tale of Tales, and a fourth book in his Ravenspell series titled S.W.A.R.M.[24]

Bibliography[edit]

The Runelords

  • The Sum of All Men (also released as The Runelords) (April 1998, Tor Books, ISBN 0-312-86653-4)
  • Brotherhood of the Wolf (May 1999, Tor Books, ISBN 0-312-86742-5)
  • Wizardborn (March 2001, Tor Books, ISBN 0-312-86741-7)
  • The Lair of Bones (November 2003, Tor Books, ISBN 0-765-30176-8)
  • Sons of the Oak (November 2006, Tor Books, ISBN 0-765-30177-6)
  • Worldbinder (September 2007, Tor Books, ISBN 0-765-31665-X)
  • The Wyrmling Horde (September 2008, Tor Books, ISBN 978-0-7653-1666-0)
  • Chaosbound (October 2009, Tor Books, ISBN 978-0-7653-2168-8)
  • A Tale of Tales (forthcoming)

Serpent Catch
Originally released as two books:

Rereleased as four books under his Farland pseudonym:

The Golden Queen
Originally released as by Wolverton, later as by Farland:

An omnibus was also released as by Farland. A related short story was also released:

Ravenspell
A middle-grade fantasy series.

Star Wars

L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Wolverton edited the following anthologies:

Selected awards and honors[edit]

Wolverton has been nominated for and won multiple awards for his various works.

Year Organization Award title,
Category
Work Result Refs
1987 Writers of the Future Fourth Quarter First Place "On My Way to Paradise" Won [25]
Golden Pen Award Won
1990 Locus Locus Award,
Best First Novel
On My Way to Paradise 3 [26]
Locus Award,
Best Science Fiction Novel
On My Way to Paradise 26
Philadelphia Science Fiction Society Philip K. Dick Award On My Way to Paradise Honorable mention [27]
1997 Locus Locus Award,
Best Novelette
"After a Lean Winter" 14 [28]
Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Nebula Award,
Best Novelette
Nominated [29]
2005 Association for Mormon Letters AML Award,
Young Adult Literature
Of Mice and Magic Honorable mention [30]
2008 LDStorymakers Whitney Award,
Best Speculative Fiction
The Wyrmling Horde Finalist [31]
2009 LDStorymakers Whitney Award,
Best Historical Fiction
In the Company of Angels Finalist [9]
Whitney Award,
Best Novel of the Year
Won
Whitney Award,
Outstanding Achievement
Won

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Some sources give his birth date as May 15. His official obituary gives May 28.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "David Wolverton". McMillan Mortuary. Archived from the original on January 20, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Dave Wolverton (1957–2022)". Locusmag.com. January 14, 2022. Archived from the original on January 17, 2022. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  3. ^ a b NewsNet Staff Writer (October 22, 2000). "BYU grad makes impact in fantasy world". The Daily Universe. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  4. ^ a b c Nicholls, Peter; Clute, John; Langford, David (January 17, 2022). "Wolverton, Dave". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Archived from the original on January 17, 2022. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  5. ^ "Title: On My Way to Paradise". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. February 19, 2015. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  6. ^ "David Farland: Writer Judge – Biography". Writers of the Future. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  7. ^ a b "Series: Writers of the Future". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. November 23, 2016. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  8. ^ "2009 Winners". Whitney Awards. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  9. ^ a b "2009 Whitney Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on January 20, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  10. ^ "Award Bibliography: Dave Wolverton". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  11. ^ "The 2012 International Book Awards". International Book Awards. Archived from the original on December 13, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  12. ^ "Hollywood Book Festival Names Nightingale for Top Honors". Hollywood Book Festival. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  13. ^ "2012 Southern California Book Festival Names Winners". The Southern California Book Festival. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  14. ^ "2012 Global Ebook Awards Finalists". Dan Poynter's Global Ebook Awards. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  15. ^ Sanderson, Brandon (January 17, 2022). "Dave Wolverton—A Friend and Mentor". BrandonSanderson.com. Archived from the original on January 17, 2022. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  16. ^ "David Farland's Writing Workshops". David Farland. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  17. ^ a b c Armstrong, Kiah (January 14, 2022). "New York Times best-selling author, BYU professor passes away". ABC4 Utah. Archived from the original on January 17, 2022. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  18. ^ a b Lentz, Eric (January 15, 2022). "Dave Wolverton, Creator of Dathomir and the Nightsisters, Has Died at 64". Star Wars News Net. Archived from the original on January 17, 2022. Retrieved January 17, 2022.
  19. ^ "About David Farland". David Farland. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  20. ^ "The Runelords Movie". Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  21. ^ "Summary Bibliography: Dave Wolverton". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. January 14, 2022. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  22. ^ Anderson, Kevin J. (January 14, 2022). "It's a terribly sad day". Facebook. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  23. ^ Wolverton, Spencer (January 14, 2022). "Again this Dave's son Spencer". Facebook. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  24. ^ "Update for 2021". New York Times Bestselling Author David Farland. January 8, 2021. Retrieved April 25, 2022.
  25. ^ "Volume 03 – 1987 – Winners – Writers & Illustrators of the Future". Writers of the Future. Archived from the original on April 20, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  26. ^ "1990 Locus Poll Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  27. ^ "1990 Philip K. Dick Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  28. ^ "1997 Locus Poll Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on November 9, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  29. ^ "1997 Nebula Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on December 28, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  30. ^ "2005 Association for Mormon Letters Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on October 20, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  31. ^ "2008 Whitney Award". isfdb.org. Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Archived from the original on January 20, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2022.

External links[edit]

Interviews