David Archer (scientist)

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David Edward Archer (born September 15, 1960) is a computational ocean chemist,[1] and has been a professor at the Geophysical Sciences department at the University of Chicago since 1993.[2] He has published research on the carbon cycle of the ocean and the sea floor. He has worked on the history of atmospheric CO
2
concentration, the expectation of fossil fuel CO
2
over geologic time scales in the future, and the impact of CO
2
on future ice age cycles, ocean methane hydrate decomposition, and coral reefs.[1] Archer is a contributor to the RealClimate blog.[1]

Teaching responsibilities[edit]

He teaches classes on global warming, environmental chemistry, and global geochemical cycles.[2] He is the author of Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast, an introductory textbook on the environmental sciences for non-science undergraduates.[3]

Education[edit]

He obtained his Ph.D from the University of Washington in 1990.[2]

Books[edit]

  • The Global Carbon Cycle (Princeton Primers in Climate), The Global Carbon Cycle (Princeton Primers in Climate)
  • The Warming Papers: The Scientific Foundation for the Climate Change Forecast, 2010, edited with Raymond Pierrehumbert, ISBN 978-1-4051-9616-1, 432 pages
  • The Long Thaw: How Humans Are Changing the Next 100,000 Years of Earth's Climate, 2008, ISBN 978-0-691-13654-7, 192 pages
  • The Climate Crisis: An Introductory Guide to Climate Change, 2010, ISBN 978-0-521-73255-0, 260 pages
  • Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast, 2006, ISBN 978-1-4051-4039-3, 208 pages

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "David Archer". RealClimate. Retrieved 6 December 2009.
  2. ^ a b c "David Archer". University of Chicago Website. Archived from the original on 10 March 2010. Retrieved 6 December 2009.
  3. ^ "Geophysical Sciences". geosci.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2020-11-26.

External links[edit]