David B. Norman

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David Bruce Norman (born in the United Kingdom on June the 20th, 1952) is a British paleontologist, currently the main curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Sedgwick Museum, Cambridge University.[1] For many years, Norman has also been the Sedgwick Museum's director, before being replaced in 2013 by current director Kenneth McNamara.

Life and career[edit]

Norman is a fellow at Christ's College, Cambridge where he teaches geology in the Natural Sciences tripos. A member of the Palaeontological Association,[2] he has studied Iguanodon[3] and also has participated in the studies and scientific surveys included in the dinosaur work The Dinosauria (2nd edition, 2004). The species epithet of Equijubus normani was named in honour of him.[4]

In 2017, Dr Norman was one of three British palaeontologist who proposed a radical new hypothesis for early dinosaur evolution and interrelationships in a paper in the journal Nature. In this work, Matthew Baron, Norman and Paul Barrett (2017) suggested that Ornithischia and Theropoda were closely related as part of a new clade that they named Ornithoscelida.[5]

He also possesses a keen interest in rugby, and he regularly referees for Cambridge University and District Rugby Referees Society (CUDRRS), earning himself the nickname 'Refosaurus Rex'.

Works[edit]

Children books[edit]

  • The Poster Book of Dinosaurs, Hodder Children's Books, 1988 (illustrations by John Sibbick)
  • The Humongous Book of Dinosaurs, Publisher: Stewart, Tabori and Chang (April 1997) ; ISBN 978-1556705960
  • The Big Book of Dinosaurs, Publisher: Welcome Books (April 2001) ; ISBN 978-0941807487
  • Dinosaurs Sticker Book, Usborne Sticker Books, 2010, ISBN 978-1409520610

Popular science books[edit]

  • Spotter's Guide to Dinosaurs & Other Prehistoric Animals, Usborne Publishing, London, 1980 (illustrations by Bob Hersey)
  • When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1985 (illustrations by John Sibbick)
  • The Age of Dinosaurs, Hodder Wayland, November 1985
  • Dinosaurs!, E.D.C. Publishing, December 1985 (illustrations by Ruth Thomson and Bob Hersey)
  • Dinosaur, co-authored with Angela Milner, Dorling Kindersley Eyewitness Books, London, 1989
  • Dinosaur!, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1991, ISBN 978-0-13-218140-2 (the official companion to A&E's 1991 four-part television series hosted by Walter Cronkite)
  • Prehistoric Life: the rise of the vertebrates, John Wiley & Sons, New York, December 1994 (illustrations by John Sibbick)
  • The Smithsonian Handbook to Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals, co-authored with Hazel Richardson, Dorling Kindersley, 2003, ISBN 978-0-7894-9361-3

Scientific books and surveys[edit]

TV documentaries[edit]

Crew member, as a scientific advisor[edit]

On screen, as himself[edit]

  • Dinosaur! (four-part TV series documentary, hosted by Walter Cronkite, A&E, 1991, Norman appears in all four episodes: "The Tale of a Tooth", "The Tale of a Bone", "The Tale of an Egg" and "The Tale of a Feather")
  • The Dinosaurs! (television documentary miniseries produced by PBS in 1992)
  • Dinosaurs Myths & Reality (TV movie documentary, 1995, Produced by Castle Communications and Cromwell Productions Ltd.)
  • The Making of Walking with Dinosaurs (TV movie documentary about the series Walking with Dinosaurs, 1999, "making of" produced and directed by Jasper James for the BBC)

Acknowledgements[edit]

TV credits[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sedgwick Museum website (staff)
  2. ^ http://www.palass.org/modules.php?name=palaeo&sec=careers&page=94
  3. ^ http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/biographies/MainBiographies/N/Norman/1.html
  4. ^ You, Luo, Shubin, Witmer, Tang and Tang (2003). "The earliest-known duck-billed dinosaur from deposits of late Early Cretaceous age in northwest China and hadrosaurid evolution." Cretaceous Research, 24: 347-353.
  5. ^ Baron, M.G., Norman, D.B., and Barrett, P.M. (2017). A new hypothesis of dinosaur relationships and early dinosaur evolution. Nature, 543: 501–506. doi:10.1038/nature21700