David Bradley (American actor)

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David Bradley
Born Texas
Occupation Film actor
Years active 1989 – present

David Bradley (born Bradley Simpson in Texas, 2 October, 1956) is an American actor and martial artist, known for starring in numerous low-budget action movies beginning in the late 1980s. His best-known films are the American Ninja sequels.[1][2]

Career[edit]

Bradley is known for his role as Sean Davidson in American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt and American Ninja 4: The Annihilation. He also stars in a separate film titled, American Ninja V, as Joe Kastle, which is not technically a sequel to the previous American Ninja films, but a different movie altogether. Previous to making films, Bradley worked as care salesman on Wilshire Boulevard. He attended the screening of American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt in Los Angeles, and director Cedric Sundstrom claimed that he in Bradley found a good balance between vulnerability and physical aspects.[3] According to Sundstrom, Bradley always resented the fact that his character got rescued by Michael Dudikoff's character in the film American Ninja 4: The Annihilation.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Bradley is trained in Karate (black belt), Shotokan, Kempo, Tai Chi, and Aikido.[5]

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1997 Total Reality Anthony Rand
Expect to Die Dr. Vincent MacIntyre
Crisis Alex aka Dead End
1996 White Cargo Joe Hargatay
Exit Charles aka Strip To Kill; Direct-to-video
1995 Cyborg Cop II Jack Ryan aka Cyborg Soldier
Hard Justice Nick Adams Direct-to-video
1994 Blood Run Brad Kingsbury aka Outside the Law (USA)
Blood Warriors Wes Healey TV movie
1993 Cyborg Cop Jack
American Ninja V Joe Kastle aka American Ninja 5 (USA)
1992 American Samurai Andrew 'Drew' Collins aka Ninja: American Samurai (USA)
1991 Lower Level Sam Direct-to-video
1990 American Ninja 4: The Annihilation Sean Davidson
1989 American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt Sean Davidson aka The American Ninja
Murder, She Wrote Adam Perry TV series ("Trevor Hudson's Legacy")

External links[edit]

References[edit]