David Carrier

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David Carrier
Born 1944 (age 72–73)
Alma mater Columbia University
Era Contemporary philosophy
Region Western philosophy
School Analytic[1][2]
Main interests
Aesthetics, cultural criticism, comics theory[1]
Notable ideas
Analytic philosophy of comics[1][2]

David Carrier (/ˈkæriər/; born 1944) is an American philosopher and art and cultural critic.

Education[edit]

Carrier received a Ph.D. in philosophy from Columbia University, where he was a student of Arthur Danto, in 1972. He was a Getty Scholar (1999–2000),[3] a Clark Fellow (2004),[4] a Senior Fellow, National Humanities Center, 2006-2007[5] and holder of the Fulbright-Luce Lectureship, Spring 2009.[6]

Work[edit]

Carrier was the Champney Family Professor in the department of art and art history at Case Western Reserve University and was a professor of philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the author of Principles of Art History Writing (Penn State University Press, 1991), The Aesthete in the City: The Philosophy and Practice of American Abstract Painting in the 1980s (Penn State University Press, 1994), High Art: Charles Baudelaire and the Origins of Modernist Painting (Penn State University Press, 1996), A World Art History and Its Objects (Penn State University Press, 2009), The Aesthetics of Comics (Penn State University Press, 2000), and Museum Skepticism: A History of the Display of Art in Public Galleries (Duke University Press, 2006), and Wild Art with his partner Joachim Pissarro (Phaidon Press), among others. He is a contributor to ArtForum, BOMB Magazine,[7] and ArtUS.

He has written about the history and philosophy of art writing, raising questions about the relativism of art writing in different eras by comparing texts written about the same artwork and analyzing changing styles of interpretation.[8]

Books[edit]

  • Truth and Falsity in Visual Images (with Mark Roskill) (University of Massachusetts Press, 1983)
  • Artwriting (University of Massachusetts Press, 1987)
  • Principles of Art History Writing (Penn State University Press, 1991)
  • Poussin's Paintings: A Study in Art-Historical Methodology (Penn State University Press, 1993)
  • The Aesthete in the City: The Philosophy and Practice of American Abstract Painting in the 1980s (Penn State University Press, 1994)
  • Nicolas Poussin: Lettere sull'arte (Editor, with an introduction; Hestia edizione, 1995)
  • High Art: Charles Baudelaire and the Origins of Modernism (Penn State University Press, 1996)
  • England and Its Aesthetes: Biography and Taste (Routledge, 1998)
  • Garner Tullis: The Life of Collaboration (Garner Tullis, 1998)
  • The Aesthetics of Comics (Penn State University Press, 2000)
  • Rosalind Krauss and American Philosophical Art Criticism: From Formalism to Beyond Postmodernism (Praeger, 2002)
  • Writing about Visual Art (Aesthetics Today) (Allworth Press, 2003)
  • Sean Scully (Thames & Hudson, 2004)
  • Museum Skepticism: A History of the Display of Art in Public Galleries (Duke University Press, 2006)
  • A World Art History and Its Objects (Penn State University Press, 2009)
  • Proust/Warhol: Analytical Philosophy of Art (Peter Lang, 2009)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c David Carrier, The Aesthetics of Comics, Penn State University Press, 2000, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Meskin, Aaron and Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach, Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, p. xxix.
  3. ^ Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities. "1999/2000: Humanities in Perspective". Getty Research Institute. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. "The Clark Announces 2004-2005 Clark Fellows". Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. Retrieved 9 December 2011. 
  5. ^ National Humanities Center. "Fellows of the Center, 1978-2011". National Humanities Center. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Fulbright Scholar Program. "U.S. Scholar Directory 2008-09 Art History". Fulbright Scholar Program. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  7. ^ BOMB Magazine. "David Carrier and John Elderfield by John Elderfield and David Carrier BOMB 55/Spring 1996". BOMB Magazine. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  8. ^ Gilmore, Jonathan (Winter 1995). "David Carrier's Art History". The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. 53 (1): 39–47.