David Chodounsky

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David Chodounsky
— Alpine skier  —
DisciplinesGiant slalom, slalom[1]
ClubCrested Butte Mountain
Sports Team
Born (1984-06-25) June 25, 1984 (age 34)[2][3][4]
Saint Paul, Minnesota[2][4]
Height5 ft 11 in (180 cm)[1][2][4]
World Cup debutDecember 21, 2009 (age 25)
RetiredJuly 3, 2018 (age 34)
Websitedavidchodounsky.com
Olympics
Teams2 – (20142018)
Medals0
World Championships
Teams4 – (201117)
Medals0
World Cup
Seasons5th – (201317)
Podiums0
Overall titles0 – (49th in 2016)
Discipline titles0 – (15th in SL, 2016)

David Chodounsky (born June 25, 1984) is an American former alpine skier and member of the United States Ski Team's alpine skiing program. His specialist disciplines were the slalom and giant slalom events.[1] Chodounsky competed as part of the U.S. Olympic Alpine Ski Team in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia and the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyongchang, South Korea. Prior to competing as a member of the United States Ski Team, Chodounsky attended Dartmouth College, where he competed on the school's alpine skiing team.

Background[edit]

David Chodounsky was born on June 25, 1984 in Saint Paul, Minnesota[2][3][4] to Anna and Martin Chodounsky,[1] Czech parents originally from Prague.[5] He was raised in Minnesota and began skiing at the age of two on a pair of "whittled wooden planks" in his family's front yard.[2][4] Chodounsky began ski racing at the age of seven, and joined a local ski racing team at Buck Hill in Burnsville, Minnesota.[2][4] While participating in the team, he was coached alongside Lindsey Vonn by Erich Sailer.[2][4] To further his skiing career, Chodounsky and his family relocated in 1995 to Crested Butte, Colorado when he was 11 years old.[2][6] There, Chodounsky attended Crested Butte Academy.[2][4][6]

College ski career[edit]

Following his graduation from Crested Butte Academy in 2003,[4] Chodounsky was unable to qualify for the United States Ski Team.[2] he was accepted to Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, but deferred for a year to train in Europe.[6] Chodounsky began attending Dartmouth in fall 2004, where he participated in the college's ski team.[2][3][6] During his freshman year at Dartmouth in 2005, Chodounsky won the slalom title at the NCAA Skiing Championships.[2][6] Two years later, during his sophomore year at Dartmouth, Chodounsky was the captain of the school's ski program.[2] He graduated from Dartmouth College in 2008 with a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in engineering and geology.[2][4][6]

Racing career[edit]

Following his graduation from Dartmouth, Chodounsky won the United States national slalom title in 2009.[1][2][6] Upon winning this title, Chodounsky was selected to join the United States Ski Team.[2][6] Chodounsky was the only member of the team to earn his college degree prior to making the team.[6] In 2010, Chodounsky won the slalom at the Nor-Am Cup and Australian New Zealand Cup.[3] Chodounsky cut his 2012 season short after he underwent surgery on his patella.[2] During the 2013 Alpine Skiing World Cup, Chodounsky placed 15th place in the France slalom at Val-d'Isère, and 10th place in the Switzerland slalom at Adelboden.[1] In August 2013, Chodounsky won the slaloms at both the Australian New Zealand Cup and the Australian National Championship.[3] He finished the 2013 season ranked 21st overall in slalom.[6]

On January 26, 2014, Chodounsky was nominated by the United States Ski and Snowboard Association to compete with the U.S. Olympic Alpine Ski Team at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[7] The 2014 Winter Olympics are Chodounsky's first Olympic Games.[8] However, he failed to finish in his only event at the Games, the slalom. He was selected again for the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyongchang, South Korea, where he finished 18th in the slalom and was part of the US squad that competed in the inaugural Olympic team event, being knocked out in the first round by Great Britain.[1][9]

In July 2018, Chodounsky announced his retirement from competition via an Instagram post.[10]

World Cup results[edit]

Season standings[edit]

Season Age Overall Slalom Giant
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2011 26 112 43
2012 27
2013 28 63 21
2014 29 62 19
2015 30 70 25 39
2016 31 49 15 40
2017 32 73 31
2018 33 89 30
  • Standings through January 28, 2018

Race results[edit]

Through January 2017, Chodounsky has yet to reach a World Cup podium, but has seven finishes in the top ten; his best result is fourth place in a slalom in December 2015.

World Championship results[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2011 26 DNF2
2013 28 DNF1
2015 30 DNF1 29
2017 32 12 11

Olympic results Olympic rings without rims.svg[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined Team event
2014 29 DNF1 not run
2018 33 18 9

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. "Team USA Profile: David Chodounsky". United States Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on February 11, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Alpine Athletes: David Chodounsky". United States Ski Team. Archived from the original on February 11, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Biography: CHODOUNSKY David". International Ski Federation. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Biography". David Chodounsky. Archived from the original on December 14, 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  5. ^ Lyžař Krýzl byl ve Francii nejlepší z Čechů, ale ne nejlepším česky mluvícím závodníkem Archived February 19, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. at Czech Radio, December 15, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Peggy Shinn (November 10, 2013). "David Chodounsky: From NCAA Champion To The Olympic Games?". United States Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on February 10, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  7. ^ U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association (January 26, 2014). "World Champions, Gold Medalists Lead Olympic Alpine Team". United States Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on February 11, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  8. ^ NBC. "Athlete Profile: David Chodounsky". NBC. Archived from the original on February 7, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  9. ^ Shinn, Peggy (24 February 2018). "U.S. Alpine Skiers Fall To Britain – But Have A Lot Of Fun – At Inaugural Olympic Team Event". United States Olympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  10. ^ MacDonald, Jamie (6 July 2018). "Red, White & Trending: June 29-July 5". United States Olympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2018.

External links[edit]