David Cockayne

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David Cockayne
Born David John Hugh Cockayne
(1942-03-19)19 March 1942
Died 22 December 2010(2010-12-22) (aged 68)
Fields Materials Science
Alma mater
Thesis Electron microscope images of defects in crystal lattices (1970)
Known for
Notable awards

David John Hugh Cockayne FRS[5] FInstP (19 March 1942 – 22 December 2010) was a Professor in the Department of Materials at the University of Oxford.[6][7] He was the president of the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy from 2003 till 2007, then vice-president 2007 to 2010.[5]

Career and research[edit]

Cockayne was an electron microscopist who played an important role in the development of weak-beam transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in the application of high resolution TEM to diamond, fullerenes and semiconductors.[8] [9][10]

Education[edit]

Cockayne was educated at the University of Melbourne[8] and the University of Oxford where he was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1970 for research into crystal lattices using electron microscopy.[11]

Awards and honours[edit]

Cockayne was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1997[5] and the Institute of Physics (FInstP). His certificate of election to the Royal Society reads:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lobo, C.; Leon, R.; Marcinkevic̆ius, S.; Yang, W.; Sercel, P. C.; Liao, X. Z.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D. J. H. (1999). "Inhibited carrier transfer in ensembles of isolated quantum dots". Physical Review B. 60 (24): 16647–16651. Bibcode:1999PhRvB..6016647L. ISSN 0163-1829. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.60.16647. 
  2. ^ Ray, I. L. F.; Crawford, R. C.; Cockayne, D. J. H. (1970). "The weak-beam technique applied to superlattice dislocations in an iron—aluminium alloy". Philosophical Magazine. 21 (173): 1027–1032. Bibcode:1970PMag...21.1027R. ISSN 0031-8086. doi:10.1080/14786437008238488. 
  3. ^ a b "Certificate of Election EC/1999/09: Cockayne, David John Hugh". London: Royal Society. Archived from the original on 29 July 2015. 
  4. ^ McKenzie, D. R.; Davis, C. A.; Cockayne, D. J. H.; Muller, D. A.; Vassallo, A. M. (1992). "The structure of the C70 molecule". Nature. 355 (6361): 622–624. Bibcode:1992Natur.355..622M. ISSN 0028-0836. doi:10.1038/355622a0. 
  5. ^ a b c d Hirsch, Peter (2015). "David John Hugh Cockayne 19 March 1942 – 22 December 2010". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society. Royal Society publishing. 61. ISSN 0080-4606. doi:10.1098/rsbm.2014.0025. 
  6. ^ Guy Cox (1 February 2011). "Career dedicated to the small picture". The Sydney Morning Herald. 
  7. ^ David Cockayne's publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database, a service provided by Elsevier. (subscription required)
  8. ^ a b "Professor David Cockayne's homepage". University of Oxford. Archived from the original on 1 August 2008. 
  9. ^ "Guardian obituary 2 March 2011". The Guardian. 
  10. ^ Leon, R.; Kim, Yong; Jagadish, C.; Gal, M.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D. J. H. (1996). "Effects of interdiffusion on the luminescence of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots". Applied Physics Letters. 69 (13): 1888. Bibcode:1996ApPhL..69.1888L. ISSN 0003-6951. doi:10.1063/1.117467. 
  11. ^ Cockayne, D. J. H. (1970). Electron microscope images of defects in crystal lattices (DPhil thesis). University of Oxford. OCLC 863257418.