David D. Clark

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Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table. Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table. David Dana "Dave" Clark (born April 7, 1944) is an American computer scientist and Internet pioneer who has been involved with Internet developments since the mid-1970s. He currently works as a Senior Research Scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).[1]

Education[edit]

He graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966. In 1968, he received his Master's and Engineer's degrees in Electrical Engineering from the MIT, where he worked on the I/O architecture of Multics under Jerry Saltzer. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1973.

Career[edit]

From 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect in the development of the Internet, and chaired the Internet Activities Board, which later became the Internet Architecture Board. He has also served as chairman of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council.

In 1990 he was awarded the SIGCOMM Award in recognition of his major contributions to Internet protocol and architecture. Clark received in 1998 the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal.[2] In 2001 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. In 2001, he was awarded the Telluride Tech Festival Award of Technology in Telluride, Colorado, and in 2011 the Internet & Society Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oxford Internet Institute at the Oxford University.

His recent research interests include what the architecture of the Internet will look like in the post-PC era as well as "extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing and related economic issues, and policy issues surrounding local loop employment".[1]

Clark is pessimistic about the Internet's trajectory, pointing out that its shortcomings have led to "plunging security and a decreased ability to accommodate new technologies"—at both the user level as well as its fundamental architecture. He claims that “We are at an inflection point, a revolution point” and argues for rethinking the Internet from its basic building blocks in order to counter impending strain and decreasing utility of the Internet.[3]

Selected publications[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.
  2. ^ Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.
  3. ^ Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.

External links[edit]

Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.

Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table. Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table. Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.Script error: The module returned a value. It is supposed to return an export table.