David Dineen-Porter

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David Dineen-Porter
Also known as PDF Format
DDP[1]
Born (1979-12-16) December 16, 1979 (age 37)
Origin Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Genres Electronic Music
Folk Music
Indie Rock
Chiptune
Pop
Occupation(s) Actor
Writer
Filmmaker
Comedian
Musician
Songwriter
Remixer
Years active 1998–Present
Labels Blocks Recording Club[2]

David Dineen-Porter is an actor, comedian and musician from Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[3][4] He is one of two grand prize winners of the Cambrian House's Robinhood Fund $20,000 Christmas Wish giveaway event for a "selfish wish".[5]

Career[edit]

Dineen-Porter has performed stand-up and sketch comedy in Toronto since 1997. He is former direct of the University of Toronto comedy review 'The Bob', and is co-founder of sketch troupes Uncle Sevario, Someone and the Somethings, and The Iliads.[6]

He has been published by McSweeney's, both in print and in their online incarnation [7][8]

In 2004, Dineen-Porter hosted a birthday show entitled Hexiquest[6] at the Tim Sims which consisted entirely of material he wrote.[1] He has also been a featured performer at the Tuesday Riot in Chicago in early 2007.[3][9][10]

In 2006, Dineen-Porter appeared in three episodes of the Much Music prank show Screwed Over.[6]

In February 2007, he launched The Obsidian Sled, a blog dedicated to the comedic arts of Toronto.[4]

In 2008, he was the recipient of a Canada Arts Council grant for music composition, to complete the arrangement and composition of a rock opera,[11] and is producer and director of the pilot episode of L'Brondelle's Universe[6] with Canadian actor/musician Morgan Waters.

In 2009, he contributed to the Xavier Renegade Angel episode Damnesia You, in which he appears personally as several floating heads melting Xavier with lightning from their eyes in the 8-bit animated segment of that episode.[citation needed] He also contributed his voice to recordings of Brian Joseph Davis' upcoming novel, Ronald Reagan My Father.[12][13]

He was a member of the Atheists team on CBC Television's Test the Nation: IQ broadcast live on January 24, 2010.[14]

In 2013, David starred in the Canadian independent feature film, Everyday Is Like Sunday, as Mark – a ne'er do well Torontonian trying to get his life together.[15]

Filmography[edit]

  • War of the Dead (2006) (V)
  • Blood Creek (2006) (V)
  • Chicknapping (2006) (V)
  • Screwed Over (3 episodes 2006) (TV)
  • L'Brondelle's Universe (2008)
  • Everyday Is Like Sunday (2013)

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McConvey, Joel (August 26, 2004). "MEET... David Dineen-Porter". Eye Weekly. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  2. ^ "Blocks Recording Club Building Blocks Update". Blocks Recording Club. 2009-08-05. Retrieved 2010-02-21. 
  3. ^ a b "Tuesday's Tidbits". The Bastion. Chicago. January 23, 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-10-12. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "Apes, Snakes, and Sleds: Announcements". The Bastion. February 15, 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-12-11. 
  5. ^ Ingram, Mathew (January 19, 2007). "Robin Hood's $20,000 giveaway". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  6. ^ a b c d "David Dineen-Porter bio". Laugh Sabbath. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  7. ^ http://www.mcsweeneys.net/links/events/mcsweeneystournotes.html
  8. ^ http://www.mcsweeneys.net/letters/president/
  9. ^ Levack, Chandler (May 5, 2009). "The Daily Distraction: May 5". Eye Weekly. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  10. ^ Levack, Chandler (October 2, 2009). "Pop Montreal: Day 2 In this report: PDF Format, Fever Ray, Roxanne Shante, Ian Svenonius". Eye Weekly. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  11. ^ "Funding to artists and arts organizations in Ontario, 2007-08" (PDF). Canada Council for the Arts. Retrieved 2010-02-16. 
  12. ^ http://www.ecwpress.com/books/ronald_reagan_my_father
  13. ^ http://brianjosephdavis.com/2010/01/04/ronald-reagan-my-fatherthe-radio-plays/
  14. ^ "Atheists Test the Nation: IQ". CBC Television. 2010-01-24. Retrieved 2010-02-16. 
  15. ^ National Post: Reviewed – It’s about poor, jobless, lonely Torontonian twentysomethings — and it’s smart
  16. ^ Gheciu, Alex Nino. "Let The Chips Fall Where They May". Torontoist. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 

External links[edit]