David Edwards (engineer)

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David A. Edwards
David Edwards.jpg
Born
David A. Edwards

(1961-04-06)April 6, 1961
Alma materMichigan Technological University, B.S.
Illinois Institute of Technology, PhD
Scientific career
FieldsBiomedical engineering
InstitutionsHarvard University
Websitedavidideas.com

David A. Edwards (born April 6, 1961) is an American biomedical engineer, and the founder of Sensory Cloud.[1][2] He was the Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Biomedical Engineering at Harvard University.[3][4]

Edwards designs inhalable medicines, vaccines and victuals.[5][6][7]

In 2001, Edwards was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering for transfer of scientific principles of engineering to industry, including invention and commercial development of a novel, generic aerosol drug-delivery system.

Education[edit]

Edwards studied chemical engineering, receiving a B.S. from Michigan Technological University in the field in 1983, and a Ph.D. in 1987 from the Illinois Institute of Technology.[8][9]

Career[edit]

Between 1987 and 1995, Edwards held a postdoctoral and lectureship at the Technion in Israel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[10][11] While at MIT, Robert Langer, a professor at MIT, encouraged Edwards to develop an efficient way for inhalers to deliver medicine to the lungs.[12] Edwards joined the Pennsylvania State University faculty as an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering in 1995, where he continued to research ways to make medicine inhalable.[13][14] In 1997, Science published his study on a new type of inhalable aerosol that efficiently delivered drugs to the lungs.[15][16] Edwards left academia in 1998 when he and Langer founded Advanced Inhalation Research (AIR); the startup was purchased a year later by Alkermes for $114 million.[17][18] He returned to academia in 2002, joining the Harvard faculty.[19]

Edwards' scientific work in biomedical engineering concerns the research and development of drug delivery platforms for treating infectious diseases in the developing world.[citation needed] He was a founder of Advanced Inhalation Research, now part of Alkermes, Inc.,[citation needed] of Pulmatrix,[citation needed] and of Medicine in Need, an international non-governmental organization aimed at developing new drugs and vaccines for diseases of poverty, such as tuberculosis.[20][21]

In 2020, Edwards founded the company Sensory Cloud. Sensory Cloud released a nasal inhalable product intended to reduce infected air droplets from viruses like SARS-CoV-2, a strain of coronavirus known to cause COVID-19.[22][23]

In a February 2021 study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Edwards and his colleagues posited that "exhaled aerosol increases with COVID-19 infection, age, and obesity."[24][25]

Publications[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Edwards, his wife and three children live between Boston and Paris.[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Osgood, Charles; Braver, Rita (27 September 2015). "Does a degree in chemical engineering guarantee that its holder will enjoy the sweet smell of success?". CBS Sunday Morning. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  2. ^ Pelekanos, Adelle C. (Spring 2008). "Creativity after Google" (PDF). New York Academy of Sciences Magazine. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  3. ^ Bradt, Steve (13 March 2008). "Inhaled TB vaccine more effective than traditional shot". The Harvard Gazette. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  4. ^ Etherington, Darrell (8 July 2020). "Harvard biomedical engineering professor to launch nasal spray that could reduce COVID-19 transmission risk". TechCrunch. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  5. ^ Lazar, Kay (10 April 2009). "Need a Puff of Chocolate? Inhaler Delivers Calorie-free Mist into Your Mouth". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  6. ^ Wilson, Mark (8 July 2020). "Harvard professor develops a $50 nasal spray to thwart the spread of COVID-19". Fast Company. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  7. ^ Edwards, David A.; Hanes, Justin; Caponetti, Giovanni; Hrkach, Jeffrey; Ben-Jebria, Abdelaziz; Eskew, Mary Lou; Mintzes, Jeffrey; Deaver, Daniel; Lotan, Noah; Langer, Robert (20 June 1997). "Large Porous Particles for Pulmonary Drug Delivery". Science. 276 (5320): 1868–1872. doi:10.1126/science.276.5320.1868. PMID 9188534.
  8. ^ Osgood, Charles; Braver, Rita (27 September 2015). "Does a degree in chemical engineering guarantee that its holder will enjoy the sweet smell of success?". CBS Sunday Morning. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  9. ^ Schmadeke, Steve (10 April 2009). "A whiff of innovation--and chocolate". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  10. ^ "The Alan S. Michaels Distinguished Lectureship in Medical and Biological Engineering – 2006". MIT. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  11. ^ Legg, Heidi (29 September 2015). "The Scent of a Cyborg". TheEditorial. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  12. ^ Aoki, Naomi (25 May 2003). "MIT Scientist Sees Science As Means to Change the World and He Has". The Boston Globe.
  13. ^ Aoki, Naomi (25 May 2003). "MIT Scientist Sees Science As Means to Change the World and He Has". The Boston Globe.
  14. ^ "The Alan S. Michaels Distinguished Lectureship in Medical and Biological Engineering – 2006". MIT. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  15. ^ Scripps News Service (20 June 1997). "New aerosol particle helps fight lung disorders". Deseret News. Retrieved 29 September 2020.
  16. ^ Edwards, David; Hanes, J; Caponetti, G; Hrkach, J; Ben-Jebria, A; Eskew, M.L.; Mintzes, J; Deaver, D; Lotan, N; Langer, R (20 June 1997). "Large porous particles for pulmonary drug delivery". Science. 276 (5320): 1868–1871. doi:10.1126/science.276.5320.1868. PMID 9188534.
  17. ^ Kirsner, Scott (3 March 2013). "Harvard dreamer looks for ways to link art, science, and commerce: Innovation Economy". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  18. ^ Aoki, Naomi (25 May 2003). "MIT Scientist Sees Science As Means to Change the World and He Has". The Boston Globe.
  19. ^ "The Alan S. Michaels Distinguished Lectureship in Medical and Biological Engineering – 2006". MIT. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  20. ^ "Chutzpah Science", Forbes, May 25, 2005.
  21. ^ "Nose Spray May Slow Spread of Germs", Fox News, November 30, 2004.
  22. ^ Wilson, Mark (8 July 2020). "Harvard professor develops a $50 nasal spray to thwart the spread of COVID-19". Fast Company. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  23. ^ "The Best Inventions of 2020: 100 innovations changing how we live". Time. 19 November 2020. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  24. ^ Edwards, David (23 February 2021). "Exhaled aerosol increases with COVID-19 infection, age, and obesity". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 118 (8): e2021830118. Bibcode:2021PNAS..11820218E. doi:10.1073/pnas.2021830118. PMC 7923364. PMID 33563754.
  25. ^ Hussein, Tareq; Löndahl, Jakob; Thuresson, Sara; Alsved, Malin; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Saksela, Kalle; Aqel, Hazem; Junninen, Heikki; Mahura, Alexander; Kulmalla, Markku (12 March 2021). "Indoor Model Simulation for COVID-19 Transport and Exposure". Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health. 18 (6): 2927. doi:10.3390/ijerph18062927. PMC 7999367. PMID 33809366.
  26. ^ Kirsner, Scott (3 March 2013). "Harvard dreamer looks for ways to link art, science, and commerce: Innovation Economy". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 23 September 2020.

External links[edit]