David G. Haskell

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Haskell at the 2022 Texas Book Festival

David George Haskell is a British and American biologist, writer, and William R. Kenan Jr. Professor[1] of Biology and Environmental Studies at Sewanee: The University of the South, in Sewanee, Tennessee. In addition to scientific papers, he has written essays, poems, op-eds,[2] and the books The Forest Unseen (Viking Press, Penguin Random House 2012), The Songs of Trees (Viking Press, Penguin Random House 2017), Thirteen Ways to Smell a Tree (Hachette), and Sounds Wild and Broken (Viking Press, Penguin Random House 2022).

Education[edit]

Haskell received his B.A. in zoology from the University of Oxford and his Ph.D. in evolutionary biology from Cornell University.[3]

Work[edit]

The Forest Unseen: A Year's Watch in Nature was winner of the 2013 National Academies Communication Award for Best Book,[4] finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction,[5] runner-up for the 2013 PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award,[6] winner of the 2012 National Outdoor Book Award for Natural History Literature, and the 2013 Reed Environmental Writing Award.[7] Biologist E. O. Wilson wrote that the book was "…a new genre of nature writing, located between science and poetry".[8] Outside Magazine listed the book among those that "shaped the decade", stating that it "injects much-needed vibrancy into the stuffy world of nature writing".[9] The Forest Unseen has been translated into twelve languages and was winner, in translation, of the 2016 Dapeng Nature Book Award in China.

The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors, was published in April 2017 by Viking. It won the 2018 John Burroughs Medal for Distinguished Natural History Writing[10] and the Iris Books Award.[11] Jurors for the Iris Award called The Songs of Trees “a compelling example of poetic science” that “beautifully illustrates the interconnections … of particular trees around the world, weaving together scientific knowledge about them and their relationships to the rest of the natural world including humans."[12] Public Radio International's Science Friday named The Songs of Trees of the Best Science Books of 2017,[13] Maria Popova included the book in Brain Pickings Favorite Science Books of 2017, writing that Haskell is "the rare kind of scientist Rachel Carson was when long ago she pioneered a new cultural aesthetic of poetic prose about science",[14] and Forbes.com named the book one of 10 Best Environment, Climate Science and Conservation Books of 2017.[15] The Songs of Trees has been translated into fourteen languages.

Cynthia Barnett reviewing in The New York Times, wrote of Haskell's, Sounds Wild and Broken, that it "affirms Haskell as a laureate for the earth".[16] The book was an Editor's Choice in the New York Times book review.[17]

Thirteen Ways to Smell a Tree was described by Sir Peter Crane, FRS, as "'eclectic, brilliant and beautifully written" and by Kate Humble in The Radio Times Best Books of 2021 as "My favourite book of the year".

Journalist Paul Kvinta's profile of Haskell[18] in Outside Magazine was included in the 2018 anthology Best American Science and Nature Writing, edited by Sam Kean.

Awards and honors[edit]

In 2009 he was named the Carnegie-CASE Professor of the Year in Tennessee.[19] He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation in 2014.[20]

In 2022, Haskell was elected a fellow of the Linnean Society of London. He is also a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies and elected member of the American Ornithological Society.

Bibliography[edit]

Books

  • The Forest Unseen: A Year's Watch in Nature, (Viking Books hardcover edition 2012, Penguin paperback edition 2013)[21]
  • The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors, (Viking Books hardcover edition 2017, Penguin paperback edition 2018)[22]
  • Thirteen Ways to Smell a Tree, published in UK only, (Hachette 2021)[23]
  • Sounds Wild and Broken, (Viking Books hardcover edition 2022)[24]

Essays and Op-eds

  • "Wild Sounds: The Loss of Sonic Diversity and Why It Matters", Yale Environment 360, 2022 [25]
  • "Music, Forest, Body", Orion Magazine, 2022[26]
  • "Humans Evolved to Play Music", Wired, 2022[27]
  • "The scent of trees: how to understand their language", The Financial Times, 2021[28]
  • "Eleven Ways of Smelling a Tree", Emergence Magazine, 2020[29]
  • "The Voices of Birds and the Language of Belonging", Emergence Magazine, 2019[30]
  • "Love Letter to a Forest" BBC Radio 4, 2019[31]
  • "The Most Wonderful Smelling Time of the Year", The New York Times, 2018[32]
  • "Central Park, Now More Delicious", The New York Times, 2018[33]
  • "The Seasons Aren’t What They Used to Be", The New York Times, 2017[34]
  • "Listening to the Thoughts of the Forest", Undark Magazine[35]
  • "Nature’s Case for Same-Sex Marriage", The New York Times, 2013[36]

Multimedia

  • "When the Earth started to sing", Emergence Magazine, 2022, Written and narrated by David George Haskell, Sound design and mixing by Matt Mikkelsen, Produced by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee[37]
  • "The Voices of Birds and the Language of Belonging", Emergence Magazine, 2019[38]
  • "The Atomic Tree", VR experience, 2019, Written by David G. Haskell, Adam Loften, and Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, Directed and Produced by Adam Loften and Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee[39]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Convocation kicks off Family Weekend". The University of the South. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  2. ^ Haskell, David George (March 29, 2013). "Nature's Case for Same-Sex Marriage". The New York Times.
  3. ^ "Academics • Biology • Faculty & Staff: David George Haskell". The University of the South. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  4. ^ "Academies Announce 2013 Communication Award Winners". The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. September 5, 2013.
  5. ^ "2013 Pulitzer Prizes". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  6. ^ "2013 PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award". PEN America. 25 July 2013. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  7. ^ "Reed Environmental Writing Award". Southern Environmental Law Center. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  8. ^ "The Forest Unseen by David George Haskell: 9780143122944 | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  9. ^ "The Outdoor Books that Shaped the Last Decade". Outside Online. 2019-12-25. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  10. ^ "DAVID HASKELL WINS 2018 BURROUGHS MEDAL". John Burroughs Association. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  11. ^ Bloomington, Inside IU (2020-01-27). "Around IU Bloomington". News at IU. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  12. ^ "Iris Book Award: Religion, Science, and Technology: Projects: Center for Religion & the HumanA research center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University Bloomington: Indiana University". Center for Religion & the HumanA research center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University Bloomington. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  13. ^ "The Best Science Books Of 2017". Science Friday, PRI. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  14. ^ "7 Favorite Science Books of 2017". Brain Pickings. 13 December 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  15. ^ "The 10 Best Environment, Climate Science and Conservation Books of 2017". forbes.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  16. ^ Barnett, Cynthia (2022-03-05). "Crescendos of Crickets and Choruses of Frogs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  17. ^ "10 New Books We Recommend This Week". The New York Times. 2022-03-31. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-04-01.
  18. ^ "David Haskell Speaks for the Trees". Outside Online. 2017-03-23. Retrieved 2022-01-23.
  19. ^ "David Haskell named Tennessee's top professor". Sewanee Today. Sewanee: The University of the South. November 18, 2009.
  20. ^ "David Haskell". John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  21. ^ "The Forest Unseen by David George Haskell: 9780143122944 | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  22. ^ "The Songs of Trees by David George Haskell: 9780143111306 | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  23. ^ Thirteen Ways to Smell a Tree. 2021-05-14. ISBN 978-1-85675-488-0.
  24. ^ "Sounds Wild and Broken by David George Haskell: 9781984881540 | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  25. ^ "Wild Sounds: The Loss of Sonic Diversity and Why It Matters". Yale E360. Retrieved 2022-03-31.
  26. ^ "Orion Magazine - Music, Forest, Body". Orion Magazine. Retrieved 2022-03-31.
  27. ^ Haskell, David George. "Humans Evolved to Play Music". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2022-03-31.
  28. ^ Haskell, David George (2021-10-22). "The scent of trees: how to understand their language". Financial Times. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  29. ^ "Eleven Ways of Smelling a Tree". Emergence Magazine. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  30. ^ "The Voices of Birds and the Language of Belonging". Emergence Magazine. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  31. ^ "Forest 404 - T9: Love Letter to the Forest... - BBC Sounds". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  32. ^ Haskell, David George (2018-12-01). "Opinion | The Most Wonderful Smelling Time of the Year". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  33. ^ Haskell, David George (2018-06-27). "Opinion | Central Park, Now More Delicious". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  34. ^ Haskell, David George (2017-03-17). "Opinion | The Seasons Aren't What They Used to Be". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  35. ^ "We Cannot Hope to Save Forests if We Don't Listen to Them". Undark Magazine. 2017-05-07. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  36. ^ Haskell, David George (2013-03-29). "Opinion | Nature's Case for Same-Sex Marriage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  37. ^ "When the Earth Started to Sing — David G. Haskell". Emergence Magazine. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  38. ^ "The Voices of Birds and the Language of Belonging". Emergence Magazine. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  39. ^ "The Atomic Tree". The Atomic Tree. Retrieved 2022-03-28.

External links[edit]