David G. Hebert

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David G. Hebert
Born 1972 (age 45–46)
Seattle, Washington
Nationality United States
Alma mater University of Washington
Known for sociomusicology, wind bands in Japan, music competitions, pluralism in music education, nationalism in music, historical ethnomusicology, popular music pedagogy, online music education.
Scientific career
Fields Music education, ethnomusicology, comparative education, East Asian studies, sociomusicology
Institutions Grieg Academy, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences
Thesis Music Competition, Cooperation, and Community: An Ethnography of a Japanese School Band (2005)
Doctoral advisor Patricia Shehan Campbell
Other academic advisors David Boersema, Charles Keil
Doctoral students Ari Poutiainen, Nancy Rosenberg, Robert Allen, Tapani Heikinheimo, Arnold Chiwalala
Other notable students Joseph M. Pignato
Influences Bruno Nettl, Patricia Shehan Campbell, Jere Humphreys, Lucy Green, Liora Bresler, Georgina Born, Mark Johnson, David J. Elliott, Martha Nussbaum
Website Sociomusicology

David G. Hebert (/ɛˈbɛər/; born 1972) is a musicologist and comparative educationist, employed as Professor of Music at Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (Bergen, Norway), where he leads the Grieg Academy Music Education (GAME) research group. He has contributed to the fields of music education, ethnomusicology, sociomusicology, comparative education, and East Asian Studies. From 2018, he is manager of the Nordic Network for Music Education, a multinational state-funded organization that sponsors intensive Master courses and exchange of university music lecturers and students across Northern Europe.[1]

Education and career[edit]

Hebert has worked for universities on five continents: Sibelius Academy, Boston University College of Fine Arts, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Te Wananga o Aotearoa, University of Southern Mississippi, Tokyo Gakugei University and the International Research Center for Japanese Studies. From 2012, he has also frequently lectured in Beijing for postgraduate seminars at China Conservatory, and in 2015 was a Visiting Professor in Brazil with the music PhD program at Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul.[2] Across recent years Hebert has given keynote speeches for music conferences worldwide: Poland, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, China, Tanzania, and Uzbekistan.[3] Hebert also serves on editorial boards of several scholarly journals, led the Historical Ethnomusicology group of the Society for Ethnomusicology (of which he is a Life member) in 2009-2011, and was Editor of the 25th anniversary proceedings of the Nordic Association for Japanese and Korean Studies.[4] He has also been active in development of innovative postgraduate programs: In northern Europe he collaborated in development of the Master of Global Music program,[5][6] and in China he has contributed to development of the Open Global Music Academy.[7] Hebert teaches intensive courses in the field of global arts policy for an international PhD summer school in Norway[8] and in Beijing for China University of Political Science and Law.[9] He holds the PhD and MA degrees from University of Washington, and a BA degree from Pacific University.[10]

Research interests[edit]

Prof. Hebert's research is published in several scholarly books[11] and over 30 different professional journals.[12]

Music competition in Japan[edit]

In 2012, Hebert published Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools,[13] a book that identified the world's largest music competition and documented the experiences of its participants. With more than 14,000 competing wind bands and widely admired performances, Japan is an especially important nation for instrumental music education, and Hebert's ethnographic and historical monograph has been described in the journal Music Education Research as "the most comprehensive information about concert (wind) band participation in any country."[14] According to a review in the British Journal of Music Education, "David Hebert delved deep under the surface of the seemingly everyday where he discovered anomalies and cultural specifics that are unlike anything found in the West ... His book performs the remarkable: a call to explore new ways of doing high school band programmes differently."[15] A sociologist with Tokyo Metropolitan University has said that this book "can serve as an important reference and inform the decisions of those attempting to advance changes to the educational system."[16] The book also describes Japanese composers, and has been used for concert program notes by prominent conductors, such as Eugene Corporon,[17] and Tim Reynish (who describes it as "compulsory reading for anyone interested in Japanese music")[18] This book helps to explain why music competitions are a global phenomenon.[19]

Music globalization, transculturation and hybridity[edit]

According to Roberta Pike, Hebert asserts that "research is needed to explore the role of culture in music education."[20] From a global perspective, Hebert has examined how musical practices, technologies, and genres are adopted into new contexts, including educational and religious traditions within institutions.[21] In addition to research on Japanese composers,[22] he has studied brass bands among Tongans[23] and New Zealand Maori,[24] jazz and popular music in the United States,[25] Christmas music in Finland,[26] multicultural and indigenous music education in Guyana,[27] the learning of Indian music outside of Asia,[28] and some cross-cultural music exchange projects in New Zealand[29] and Ghana.[30] Hebert has written of inherent tensions between originality and institutionalization, and contends that musical hybrid projects should be "recognized as the potential wellsprings of new musical traditions."[31] In 2008 at Boston University, he taught a course on the topic of "Music Transculturation and Hybridity".[32] Hebert's research on this topic builds on the scholarship of Bruno Nettl, Margaret Kartomi, Mark Slobin, Timothy Taylor, and Tina Ramnarine. He twice served as keynote speaker for conferences on Music and Globalization in Poland (2014 and 2015), from which proceedings were published.[33]

Pluralism and music institutions[edit]

Hebert's work has also addressed the challenges of representing cultural diversity and embracing pluralism in music education, claiming for music a unique role in intercultural communication.[34] He has advocated for popular music pedagogy and world music pedagogy as innovative approaches for reaching a wider population of students.[35] Teacher educators have noted that Hebert "guides the reader toward a sociological understanding" of diversity,[36] and offers "suggestions for 'empowering music teachers to respond appropriately to the complexity of ethnic differences'."[37] Extending in directions pioneered by his PhD mentor Patricia Shehan Campbell, Hebert has also written of "the challenges of multicultural teaching in music" and "the central role that ethnic identity plays in musical meaning and engagement."[38] His research in this area has often been in collaboration with Nordic scholars, including Eva Saether[39] and Marja Heimonen.[40] In 2018, along with William Coppola, he is developing World Music Pedagogy, Vol. 7: Higher Education for the Routledge series.[41]

Nationalism in music education[edit]

Hebert co-edited with Alexandra Kertz-Welzel[42] (Professor and Chair, University of Munich), the 2012 book Patriotism and Nationalism in Music Education.[43] This book includes contributions by music education researchers from several continents, and discusses "how music contributes to the creation of an emotional climate in schools, and its function in fostering the formation of particular loyalties, identities and dispositions."[44] Music psychologist John Sloboda described this book as "a 'must read' resource for anyone interested in this topic."[45] According to a review in Fontes Artis Musicae, Hebert and Kertz-Welzel pose "challenging questions about the role of music teachers in propagating and inculcating patriotic sentiments", and the book is relevant beyond the sociology of music, to any "scholars engaged in researching comparative and political educational issues."[46] Elsewhere, Hebert has argued that "intercultural music transmission" enables national boundaries to be positively transcended via music participation.[47]

Historical ethnomusicology[edit]

Hebert's interests in global music historiography developed as he explored such topics as how European music was adopted in Japan,[48] and how the American genres of jazz and rock music ironically struggled to gain acceptance in American schools.[49] In 2014 he produced a book with Jonathan McCollum (Washington College) entitled Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology.[50] Through use of "a broad spectrum of geocultural examples, the volume includes several engaging strategies for using and writing about history in order to understand the world's musics".[51] Ethnomusicologists Keith Howard, Daniel M. Neuman and Judah Cohen contributed chapters. Hebert now edits a book series in this field with Jonathan McCollum for Rowman and Littlefield press, The Lexington Series in Historical Ethnomusicology: Deep Soundings.[52]

Music technology and online music education[edit]

Hebert has also been active in researching the application of new technologies in online music education and research.[53] Prior to becoming interested in "big data", he authored an article examining the challenges of educating music teachers in a fully online doctoral program (at Boston University).[54] This sparked some debate – with Kenneth H. Phillips, among others – that led to further publications on projects in Europe and Africa that made use of the Internet to support intercultural music exchange.[55] Hebert's interests in music technology brought him to collaborations with Alex Ruthmann,[56] and projects in digital humanities with Danish computer scientist and computational musicologist Kristoffer Jensen.[57]

East Asian studies[edit]

Hebert has researched music in Japan, where he lived for about 5 years, and he often lectures for leading universities and conservatories in China. He has published several articles and book chapters on western music in Japan (and Korea), and is editor of International Perspectives on Translation, Education, and Innovation in Japanese and Korean Societies (Springer), the 25th anniversary proceedings of the Nordic Association for Japanese and Korean Studies.[58] Hebert has also drawn attention to East Asian arts through the International Sociological Association.[59]

Philosophical orientation[edit]

Hebert claims that postmodernist discourse no longer offers an adequate explanation for contemporary musical practices, and that most music philosophy suffers from an ethnocentric orientation. Rather, he advocates a global-historical perspective: that humanity has recently exited a period of "digital prehistory" to enter a phase of "data saturation" through ubiquitous mass surveillance,[60] causing conditions he describes as "glocalimbodied,"[61] meaning that local and global forces converge to "stamp" the identities of individual actors suspended within a social structure shaped by participatory media. Hebert also argues that music, now most commonly consumed in digital form, may be understood as "content" in a "selfie-stick society".[62] In his view, this new context results in music creation and consumption increasingly transcending earlier connections to space and time, engendering both a blurring and reactionary institutionalization of local genres and historical styles. Consequently, Hebert contends that music education policies and practices should be re-envisioned to emphasize individual originality and empowerment via a musicianship of "flexibility",[63] with inclusion of marginalized traditions, cultivation of both acoustic and digital competencies, and rejection of any ties to "aesthetic fundamentalism", techno-utopianism,[64] militarism and nationalism.[65] Music scholars have noted that Hebert "believes music education will become more relevant and effective when it attends more completely to 'creative agency via technology and musical hybridity'," and that "Music learned in school should have some connection to the music the student engages with outside of school and that musicianship should be understood as an ‘embodied practice situated in sociocultural contexts’."[66] An advocate for increased contemporary music, music technology, and popular music in schools, Hebert nevertheless warns that these should not be seen as panacea for poor teaching or inadequate funding and facilities, and that historical traditions – including the heritage of "classical" art music – still legitimately require ample space in school education.[67] Hebert's work especially promotes the value of internationalism in teacher education,[68] and emphasizes the importance of an international-comparative perspective for envisioning improvements to educational policies and practices.[69]

Criticism. While largely accepted, some of Hebert's conclusions have faced opposition from other scholars. His research in Japan controversially suggests that some important aspects of music history are inaccurately "remembered", and he has argued that similar issues may be found in common music history textbooks in the US and elsewhere.[70] Hebert asserts that music contests can have not only positive, but also negative consequences for participants and the musical traditions they display, and require careful design for desirable outcomes. Some music educators defend traditional pedagogies that Hebert and others claim need to be redeveloped or supplemented with new approaches.[71] Robert Walker and Roger Scruton would disagree with Hebert's position regarding the value of popular music pedagogy.[72] Vincent Bates has argued that a "cosmopolitan" perspective may already receive excessive emphasis in the field of music education,[73] while Thomas Regelski has suggested that "culture" – a concept emphasized in much of Hebert's writings – is a nebulous construct with questionable utility for the field.[74]

Musical activities[edit]

Primarily employed as a professor, Hebert continues to perform as a professional musician in various genres, and teaches a course in songwriting.[75] A jazz trumpeter and classical bass baritone singer, in 2013-2015 he had occasional work as a professional chorus member (Edvard Grieg Kor)[76] with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Bergen National Opera, and Berlin Philharmonic.[77] In the 1990s, Hebert performed as singer-songwriter with Portland, Oregon-based alternative rock band Post Impression, which shared stages with The Posies, Heatmiser and Everclear. He later played as a member of Zimbabwean band Maichi Maraire and Kubatana, Seattle-based Cuban salsa band Son de Cinco a Siete, and his own jazz groups. Moving to Tokyo, he performed as trumpeter and vocalist in the duo Jazz de Iitomo with Johnny Todd,[78] jazz pianist/arranger and former bandleader for Don Ho. Together with Todd, he recorded an album for vocalist Midori Takamura and had a few appearances with Mika Todd from hit J-Pop group Minimoni. In 2003, he also developed an original opera in Japan in collaboration with Belgian artist Eric Van Hove and electronic musician Kenji Williams.[79] In New Zealand, he performed as a trumpeter with Auckland Symphony Orchestra and Manukau Symphony Orchestra, and in Russia he recorded with the experimental free improvisation group Moscow Conservatory Pan-Asian Ensemble.[80]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nordic Network for Music Education". Sociomusicology. Retrieved March 17, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Class with Professor David Hebert". FAPROM research group, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. Retrieved December 15, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Hebert in CRISTIN". CRISTIN: Current Research Information System in Norway. Retrieved January 15, 2015. 
  4. ^ Hebert, David (2018). International Perspectives on Translation, Education, and Innovation in Japanese and Korean Societies. New York: Springer.  ISBN 9783319684321
  5. ^ "Educating Professional Musicians for a Multicultural Society, Proceedings of MORE Project". Cite de la Musique, Paris. Retrieved July 15, 2015. 
  6. ^ "GLOMAS: Global Music Master Degree". Glomus Network, Nordplus (Nordic Council of Ministers). Retrieved July 15, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Music Education via MOOCs: A Status Report on the Open Global Music Academy Project" (PDF). Tenth Asia-Pacific Symposium for Music Education Research (p.79.), Hong Kong Institute of Education, China. Retrieved July 15, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Six PhD Courses on Global Challenges". Bergen Summer Research School, Bergen Global Initiative. Retrieved March 17, 2018. 
  9. ^ "Arts Policy Course at Chinese Law School". Sociomusicology. Retrieved March 17, 2018. 
  10. ^ "David Hebert-Academia.edu". Academia.edu. Retrieved January 15, 2015. 
  11. ^ "David G. Hebert on Amazon". Amazon.com. Retrieved July 15, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Google Scholar: David G. Hebert". Google Scholar. Retrieved February 15, 2016. 
  13. ^ Hebert, David (2012). Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese School. Dordrecht: Springer Press ISBN 9400721773
  14. ^ Peter Gouzouasis and Alan Henderson (2012). Secondary Student Perspectives on Musical and Educational Outcomes from Participation in Band Festivals. "Music Education Research", 14(4), pp.479-498.
  15. ^ Norman Stanfield (2014). Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools. "British Journal of Music Education", 31(1), pp.103-105.
  16. ^ Nishijima, Hiroshi (2013). Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools. "Social Science Japan Journal", 16(2), pp.337-340.
  17. ^ "Lonestar Wind Orchestra: Notes from Japan". Lonestar Wind Orchestra, Dallas, Texas, USA. Retrieved February 15, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Repertoire By Country - Repertoire - Tim Reynish". timreynish.com. 
  19. ^ Hebert, David G. (2018, in press). Competition in Music. SAGE International Encyclopedia of Music and Culture (Janet Sturman, Ed.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  20. ^ Roberta E. Pike, Japanese Education: Selective Bibliography of Psychosocial Aspects (Fremont, CA: Jain, 2007), p.83.
  21. ^ Hebert, D. G., Abramo, J. & Smith, G. D. (2016). Epistemological and Sociological Issues in Popular Music Education. In G. D. Smith, et al (Eds.), "The Routledge Research Companion to Popular Music Education". New York: Routledge; Hebert, David (2011) "Cultural Translation and Music: A Theoretical Model and Examples from Japan" In Noriko Takei-Thunman and Nanyan Guo (Eds.), Cultural Translations: Proceedings of the Workshop/Symposium in Varberg and Kyoto, University of Gothenburg, pp.20-39
  22. ^ Hebert, David (2012) "Japanese Composers and Wind Band Repertoire". In Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools. Dordrecht: Springer Press, pp.155-170. ISBN 9400721773; Hebert, David (2008). "Alchemy of Brass: Spirituality and Wind Music in Japan" in E. Michael Richards and Kazuko Tanosaki, Eds., Music of Japan Today. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008, pp.236-244. ISBN 1847185622; Hebert, D. G. (2001). Hoshina and Ito: Japanese Wind Band Composers. Journal of Band Research, 37(1), pp. 61-77
  23. ^ David G. Hebert (2008). "Music Transmission in an Auckland Tongan Community Youth Band". International Journal of Community Music, 1(2), pp.169-188.
  24. ^ Hebert, David (2008). "Music Transculturation and Identity in a Maori Brass Band Tradition". In R. Camus & B. Habla, (Eds.), Kongressbericht Northfield /Minnesota, USA 2006 (Alta Musica, 26) Tutzing: Schneider, pp.173-200. ISBN 379521257X
  25. ^ David G. Hebert (2011). "Originality and Institutionalization: Factors Engendering Resistance to Popular Music Pedagogy in the USA". Music Education Research International, 5, pp.12-21.
  26. ^ David G. Hebert, Alexis Kallio and Albi Odendaal (2012). "Not So Silent Night: Tradition, Transformation, and Cultural Understandings of Christmas Music Events in Helsinki, Finland". Ethnomusicology Forum, 21(3), pp.402-423.
  27. ^ Rohan Sagar and David G. Hebert, "Research-Based Curriculum Design for Multicultural School Music: Reflections on a National Project in Guyana," Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education.
  28. ^ Hebert, David (2003). "Lessons from India: Globalization's Implications for Music Education," Journal of the Indian Musicological Society, Vol. 34 (pp. 38-46).
  29. ^ Pornprapit Phoasavadi and David G. Hebert (2006). "Celebrating Maori and Thai Music Magic: Implications of World Music Collaboration". Research in New Zealand Performing Arts, 1.
  30. ^ David G. Hebert and Eva Saether (2014). "Please Give Me Space: Findings and Implications from an Evaluation of the Glomus Intercultural Music Camp, Ghana 2011". Music Education Research, 16(4), pp.418-435.
  31. ^ Hebert, David (2009). "Rethinking the Historiography of Hybrid Genres in Music Education". In V. Kurkela & L. Vakeva (Eds.), De-Canonizing Music History. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, p.178. ISBN 1443813915
  32. ^ Boston Hybrid Musics. "Boston Hybrid Musics". bostonhybridmusics.blogspot.com. 
  33. ^ Hebert, David; Rykowski, Mikolaj (2018). Music Glocalization: Heritage and Innovation in a Digital Age. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars.  ISBN 9781527503939
  34. ^ Hebert, David (2010). "Ethnicity and Music Education: Sociological Dimensions". In Ruth Wright (Ed.), Sociology and Music Education. Aldershot: Ashgate Press, pp.93-114. ISBN 0754668010; David G. Hebert, Tuovi Martinsen, and Keld Hosbond (2010). "Launching the Nordic Master of Global Music Program". Finnish Journal of Music Education, 13(1), pp.88-91.
  35. ^ Hebert, D. G. Jazz and Rock Music. In W. M. Anderson & P. S. Campbell (Eds.), Multicultural Perspectives in Music Education, Vol.1 (third edition) (pp.112-127). Lanham, MD: Rowman-Littlefield Publishers (2011).
  36. ^ Patrick Schmidt (2012). Book Review – Sociology and Music Education "Visions of Research in Music Education", 22.
  37. ^ Tami J. Draves (2011). Sociology and Music Education. "Journal of Historical Research in Music Education", 33(1), pp.109.
  38. ^ Sharon G. Davis (2013). Sociology in Music Education "Music Education Research", 15(2), pp.249-251.
  39. ^ "Eva Sæther". evasaether.com. 
  40. ^ Marja Heimonen and David G. Hebert (2010). "Pluralism and Minority Rights in Music Education: Implications of the Legal and Social Philosophical Dimensions". Visions of Research in Music Education, 15; David G. Hebert and Marja Heimonen (2013). "Public Policy and Music Education in Norway and Finland". Arts Education Policy Review, 114(3), special issue on "Cosmopolitanism and Policy", pp.135-148.
  41. ^ "Publications by Professor David G. Hebert". Blogspot.com. Retrieved July 15, 2018. 
  42. ^ "Alexandra Kertz-Welzel". alexandrakertzwelzel.com. 
  43. ^ Hebert, David and Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra (2012).Patriotism and Nationalism in Music Education. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Press ISBN 1409430804
  44. ^ Stephen G. Parker (2016). Patriotism and Nationalism in Music Education. "History of Education", 45(3), pp.395-397.
  45. ^ John Sloboda (2012). Patriotism and nationalism in music education: A review essay "International Journal of Education & the Arts", 13.
  46. ^ Veronica Jamset. (2013). Patriotism and Nationalism in Music Education. "Fontes Artis Musicae", 60(2), pp.123-125.
  47. ^ David G. Hebert (2001). "The Tokyo Kosei Wind Orchestra: A Case Study of Intercultural Music Transmission". Journal of Research in Music Education, 49(3), pp.212-226; David G. Hebert and Sidsel Karlsen (2010). "Editorial Introduction: Multiculturalism and Music Education". Finnish Journal of Music Education, 13(1), pp.6-11.
  48. ^ Hebert, David (2012) "Where are These Bands From? – An Historical Overview" in Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools. Dordrecht: Springer Press, pp.11-82. ISBN 9400721773
  49. ^ David G. Hebert (2011). "Originality and Institutionalization: Factors Engendering Resistance to Popular Music Pedagogy in the USA". Music Education Research International, 5, pp.12-21; David G. Hebert and Patricia Shehan Campbell (2000). " Rock Music in American Schools: Positions and Practices Since the 1960s". International Journal of Music Education, 36(1), pp. 14-22.
  50. ^ McCollum, Jonathan and Hebert, David (2014) Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology Lanham, MD: Lexington Books / Rowman & Littlefield ISBN 0739168266
  51. ^ Justin R. Hunter (2016). Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology. "NOTES", 72(3), pp.534-537.
  52. ^ "Historical Ethnomusicology Book Series: Deep Soundings". Sociomusicology blog. Retrieved January 14, 2018. 
  53. ^ Hebert, D. G. (2016). Technology and Arts Education Policy. "Arts Education Policy Review", 117(3), pp.1-5 (Editorial Introduction, Technology Special Issue).
  54. ^ David G. Hebert (2008). "Reflections on Teaching the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music Online". International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, 39(1), pp.93-103; David G. Hebert (2007). "Five Challenges and Solutions in Online Music Teacher Education". Research and Issues in Music Education, 5.
  55. ^ Ruthmann, Alex and Hebert, David (2012) "Music Learning and New Media in Virtual and Online Environments". In Gary McPherson and Graham Welch, (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Music Education, Vol.2. Oxford University Press, pp.567-584. ISBN 0199928010; David G. Hebert (2008). "Forms of Graduate Music Education: A Response to Kenneth Phillips". Research and Issues in Music Education, 6.
  56. ^ "S. Alex Ruthmann - Faculty Bio". nyu.edu. [not in citation given]
  57. ^ Kristoffer Jensen and David G. Hebert (2016). Evaluation and Prediction of Harmonic Complexity Across 76 Years of Billboard 100 Hits. In R. Kronland-Martinet, M. Aramaki, and S. Ystad, (Eds.), Music, Mind, and Embodiment. Switzerland: Springer Press, pp.283-296. ISBN 978-3-319-46281-3; Grund, C.M and Westney, W. (2010). Music, Movement, Performance & Perception: Perspectives on Cross-Disciplinary Research and Teaching within NNIMIPA - Nordic Network for the Integration of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics. ISBN 9788792646118.
  58. ^ Hebert, David (2018). International Perspectives on Translation, Education, and Innovation in Japanese and Korean Societies. New York: Springer.  ISBN 9783319684321
  59. ^ "Sociological Approaches to Western Music in Japan". International Sociological Association. Retrieved March 15, 2015. . Also see: "Sociomusicology". David Hebert/Blogspot. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  60. ^ Hebert, David and McCollum, Jonathan (2014). "Philosophy of History and Theory in Historical Ethnomusicology". In J. McCollum and D. G. Hebert, Eds., Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books / Rowman & Littlefield, pp.85-148 ISBN 0739168266
  61. ^ David G. Hebert (2009). "On Virtuality and Music Education in Online Environments". Parlando, 48(4) [in Hungarian translation, by Mariann Abraham].
  62. ^ Hebert, David; Rykowski, Mikolaj (2018). Music Glocalization: Heritage and Innovation in a Digital Age. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars.  ISBN 9781527503939
  63. ^ Hebert, David (2009) "Musicianship, Musical Identity and Meaning as Embodied Practice" In T. Regelski & J. T. Gates (Eds.), Music Education for Changing Times: Guiding Visions for Practice. Dordrecht: Springer Press, pp.39-55. ISBN 9048126991
  64. ^ Hebert, D. G. (2016). Technology and Arts Education Policy. "Arts Education Policy Review", 117(3), pp.1-5 (Editorial Introduction, Technology Special Issue).
  65. ^ Hebert, David (2015) "Militarism and Music Education". Music Educators Journal, vol.101, no. 3, pp.77-84.
  66. ^ Jeananne Nichols (2011). Music education for changing times: A review essay "International Journal of Education & the Arts", 12.
  67. ^ David G. Hebert and Marja Heimonen (2013). "Public Policy and Music Education in Norway and Finland". Arts Education Policy Review, 114(3), special issue on "Cosmopolitanism and Policy", pp.135-148.
  68. ^ David G. Hebert, Tuovi Martinsen, and Keld Hosbond (2010). "Launching the Nordic Master of Global Music Program". Finnish Journal of Music Education, 13(1), pp.88-91; David G. Hebert and Eva Saether (2014). "Please Give Me Space: Findings and Implications from an Evaluation of the Glomus Intercultural Music Camp, Ghana 2011". Music Education Research, 16(4), pp.418-435.
  69. ^ David G. Hebert (2012). "International Comparisons in the Improvement of Education". Signum Temporis: Journal of Pedagogy and Psychology, 5(2), pp.17-27.
  70. ^ Hebert, David and McCollum, Jonathan (2014). "Philosophy of History and Theory in Historical Ethnomusicology". In J. McCollum and D. G. Hebert, Eds., Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books / Rowman & Littlefield, pp.85-148 ISBN 0739168266
  71. ^ Mark Fonder "No Default or Reset Necessary – Large Ensembles Enrich Many."; See debate between Hebert and Kenneth Phillips in 2008, "Research and Issues in Music Education", 6.
  72. ^ Robert Walker (2007). Music Education: Cultural Values, Social Change and Innovation. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.
  73. ^ Vincent C. Bates (2014). "Rethinking cosmopolitanism in music education.". Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 13(1): 310–27.
  74. ^ Thomas Regelski (2010). "Culturalism, Multi-Culturalism, and Multi-Musical Prosperity.". Finnish Journal of Music Education, 13(1), pp.95-98.
  75. ^ "HiB Faculty Profile David Gabriel Hebert (Norwegian language)". hib.no. Retrieved January 15, 2015. 
  76. ^ "Edvard Grieg Kor: The Singers". Edvard Grieg Kor, Bergen, Norway. Retrieved February 15, 2016. 
  77. ^ (McCollum and Hebert, 2014, p.409)
  78. ^ "Johnny Todd". Johnny Todd Piano. Retrieved October 15, 2015. 
  79. ^ "Correspondence: a contemporary opera". transcri.be. Retrieved July 15, 2015. 
  80. ^ "Pan-Asian Ensemble". Moscow Pan-Asian Ensemble. Retrieved July 15, 2015.