David Gove

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David Gove
Albany v Philly (2286865622).jpg
Gove in 2008
Born (1978-05-04)May 4, 1978
Centerville, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died April 5, 2017(2017-04-05) (aged 38)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Center/Right Wing
Shot Left
Played for Carolina Hurricanes
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 2000–2009

David Thomas Gove (May 4, 1978 – April 5, 2017) was an American ice hockey player and head coach of the Wheeling Nailers of the ECHL.[1] He last played with the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins of the American Hockey League (AHL) during the 2008–09 season. Though he primarily played in the minor leagues, Gove did appear in two games with the Carolina Hurricanes of the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2005 and 2007.

Career[edit]

Player[edit]

Gove grew up on Cape Cod in Massachusetts and played youth hockey locally and in Boston and area, before playing college hockey for the Western Michigan University Broncos, where he was a finalist for the Hobey Baker Award for the top player in NCAA men's hockey.[2]

Undrafted, Gove played in two NHL games with the Carolina Hurricanes over his professional career. Gove was recalled by the Hurricanes on January 30, 2006[3] and recorded an assist in his first NHL game.

Several months later, the Hurricanes won the Stanley Cup. Gove did not meet the qualifications to have his name engraved on the Cup because he did not play in half of the regular season games or make a Cup Final appearance, but he was included in the Stanley Cup team picture and was able to raise the Cup after the Hurricanes' Cup victory[4] due to being a member of the team's “Black Aces” "taxi squad."[5] He was also presented with a Stanley Cup ring by the team.[2]

Gove was recalled a second time by the Carolina Hurricanes on October 21, 2006, as an injury replacement for forward Keith Aucoin. He played one game[6] before being returned to the Hurricanes' American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate in Albany on October 23, 2006.[7] Gove was later recalled several times by the Hurricanes during the 2006–07 NHL season, but was not placed into the Hurricanes' lineup. Gove was later traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins for prospect Joe Jensen on January 31, 2008.[5] Upon announcement of the trade, Gove was assigned to the Penguins' affiliate in Wilkes-Barre and, with the club, reached the 2008 Calder Cup Final. Gove was later named captain of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins for the 2008–09 season.[8] Gove retired after the 2008–09 season, playing 522 professional games across five different leagues.

Coaching[edit]

Prior to the 2015–16 ECHL season, Gove was hired as an assistant coach to Clark Donatelli, head coach of the ECHL's Wheeling Nailers.[9] Gove was named the Nailers' interim head coach when Donatelli was promoted to the head coaching position of the Nailers' AHL affiliate the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins on December 22, 2015.[10] On January 21, 2016, he was made the full-time head coach of the Nailers.[11] However, on April 29 he took a leave of absence for undisclosed reasons from Nailers while the team was in the playoffs.[12] He was replaced as head coach in July 2016 by Nailers' assistant coach Jeff Christian.[13] It was later revealed he went into rehab for drug use, having been abusing painkillers prescribed for the injury that had ended his playing career.[2]

Death[edit]

On April 5, 2017, Gove's body was discovered at a rehabilitation facility in Pittsburgh's Uptown neighborhood where he was declared deceased by the local coroner. Several stamp bags of heroin were discovered near Gove's body. Although no official cause of death has been announced, Gove's death is believed to have been caused by a drug overdose.[14][2]

According to the Boston Globe, Gove became addicted to drugs following his playing-career ending injury.[2] In 2014, Gove reported to police that in his early teens he had been the victim of child sexual abuse by a youth coach Robert G. Richardson, and a prosecution was later brought against Gove's former coach. Years earlier, Gove had told others of the alleged crimes against him. Gove died just prior to the criminal trial, and the prosecution ended.[15][16][2]

Gove was survived by a three year old son Cullen, his mother Donna, and sisters Kim Burnieika and Kristen Buttrick.[2]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1997–98 Western Michigan CCHA 36 8 7 15 8
1998–99 Western Michigan CCHA 33 9 14 23 12
1999–00 Western Michigan CCHA 36 18 28 46 22
2000–01 Western Michigan CCHA 39 22 37 59 16
2000–01 Orlando Solar Bears IHL 9 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0
2001–02 Johnstown Chiefs ECHL 54 17 32 49 32 8 1 3 4 4
2001–02 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 17 2 4 6 8
2002–03 Laredo Bucks CHL 8 4 12 16 15
2002–03 San Antonio Rampage AHL 72 15 20 35 30 3 0 1 1 0
2003–04 Utah Grizzlies AHL 75 14 22 36 28
2004–05 Providence Bruins AHL 70 13 18 31 30 17 3 3 6 14
2005–06 Lowell Lock Monsters AHL 65 20 26 46 50
2005–06 Carolina Hurricanes NHL 1 0 1 1 0
2006–07 Albany River Rats AHL 49 8 13 21 27 4 0 2 2 4
2006–07 Carolina Hurricanes NHL 1 0 0 0 0
2007–08 Albany River Rats AHL 45 8 15 23 31
2007–08 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins AHL 36 15 7 22 10 23 5 7 12 10
2008–09 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins AHL 20 3 0 3 8
AHL totals 449 98 125 223 222 47 8 13 21 28
NHL totals 2 0 1 1 0

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
All-CCHA Second Team 1999–00
All-CCHA Second Team 2000–01

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Clark Donatelli Hired as Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Head Coach". Wheeling Nailers Official Website. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Strang, Katie (April 2018). "How the life of an ex-NHL player unraveled in the pursuit of justice". The Athletic. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  3. ^ "HURRICANES RECALL DAVID GOVE FROM LOWELL". Carolina Hurricanes. January 30, 2006. Retrieved April 7, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Gove Meets Lord Stanley's Cup". Western Michigan University. June 23, 2006. Archived from the original on March 17, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Jonathan Bombulie (January 31, 2008). "Jensen Traded". Citizen's Voice. Retrieved April 7, 2017. 
  6. ^ HockeyReference.com: October 21, 2006 (Carolina Hurricanes at New York Islanders)
  7. ^ "Notebook: Gaborik could miss 10–14 days with groin strain; Fedorov activated". USA Today. December 22, 2015. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  8. ^ ECHL.com: David Gove Biography
  9. ^ "David Gove team staff history". Elite Hockey Prospects. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  10. ^ Molinari, Dave (December 22, 2015). "Clark Donatelli named Baby Penguins' head coach". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  11. ^ "David Gove Named Nailers Head Coach". Wheeling Nailers. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Penguins play waiting games". The Scranton Times-Tribune. April 29, 2016. 
  13. ^ "NAILERS NAME JEFF CHRISTIAN AS HEAD COACH". ECHL. July 12, 2016. 
  14. ^ Iannotti, Ralph (April 6, 2017). "Coach, Retired NHL Player Found Dead Of Apparent Heroin Overdose". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved April 7, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Report: Retired NHL Player Who Died Of Apparent Overdose Was Victim In Child Rape Case". pittsburgh.cbslocal.com. KDKA-TV. September 3, 2017. Retrieved September 5, 2017. 
  16. ^ Hohler, Bob (September 2, 2017). "A hockey pro dies, and coach he said raped him is free". www.bostonglobe.com. The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 5, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Nathan Smith
Captain of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
2008–09
Succeeded by
Wyatt Smith