David Jevans

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David Jevans is the Chairman and founder of IronKey,[1] an Internet security and privacy company in California. He has previously held senior positions at various Internet security companies, primarily Chief Marketing Officer and Senior Vice President positions at Tumbleweed Communications (NASDAQ:TMWD),[2] Valicert (NASDAQ:VLCT),[3] Teros (since acquired by Citrix, NASDAQ: CTXS),[4] and Differential.[5] Prior to moving into the security industry, he served on the CEO's technology council at Apple Computers, and as Vice President of Networking at Catapult Entertainment.

Jevans is the founder, and currently Chairman, of the Anti-Phishing Working Group, and is also a member of the Department of Homeland Security ID Theft Technology Consortium, where he is a featured speaker.

An industry expert[citation needed] on Internet fraud and Internet security, Jevans is frequently quoted by the media, including American Banker,[6] CIO Magazine,[7][8] Dark Reading,[9][10] Information Week,[11][12][13] MSNBC,[14][15] PC Magazine,[16] and Washington Post.[17] He holds a Master of Science degree from the University of Calgary in Canada.

Patents[edit]

Jevans holds several invention patents in the U.S., including: Mechanism for efficient private bulk messaging,[18] Mechanism for rendering scenes using an object drawing subsystem,[19] Quality control mechanism for three-dimensional graphics rendering,[20] and Multipass graphics rendering method and apparatus with re-traverse flag.[21]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "IronKey: Management". 2008. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Tumbleweed Announces Executive Changes and Promotions (press release)". Tumbleweed Communications. April 26, 2004. Retrieved July 20, 2009. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Employment Agreement David Jevans". TechAgreements. February 18, 2003. Retrieved August 7, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Teros Appoints David Jevans Senior Vice President of Marketing". Business Wire. November 4, 2004. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  5. ^ Clark, Tim (January 26, 1998). "Differential debuts extranet suite". CNET. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  6. ^ Krebsbach, Karen (June 2004). "Security: Goin' Phishing". American Banker. Retrieved July 20, 2009. [dead link]
  7. ^ Dragoon, Alice (October 6, 2004). "Fighting Phish, Fakes and Frauds". CIO. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  8. ^ Scalet, Sarah (April 1, 2004). "Phishing Pollutes E-Mail Stream". CIO. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  9. ^ Wilson, Tim (July 23, 2008). "Researchers Raise Alarm Over New Iteration of Coreflood Botnet". DarkReading. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  10. ^ Higgins, Kelly (April 12, 2007). "10 Hot Security Startups". DarkReading. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  11. ^ Claburn, Thomas (January 23, 2008). "European Regulators Mull Protecting IP Addresses". InformationWeek. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  12. ^ Keizer, Gregg (September 18, 2006). "Phishers Spoof More Brands". InformationWeek. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  13. ^ Greenemeier, Larry (April 13, 2005). "Software And Common Sense Needed To Hook Phishers". InformationWeek. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  14. ^ Sullivan, Bob (April 15, 2004). "Free software sniffs out phishy Web sites". MSNBC. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  15. ^ Weisbaum, Herb (Dec 27, 2006). "Don't get hooked this phishing season". MSNBC. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  16. ^ Rupley, Sebastian (January 14, 2004). "No Phishing Allowed". PC Magazine. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  17. ^ Krebs, Brian (November 19, 2004). "Phishing Schemes". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 20, 2009. 
  18. ^ US 6912285, Jevans, David, "Mechanism for efficient private bulk messaging", published February 26, 2001 
  19. ^ US 5986667, Jevans, David, "Mechanism for rendering scenes using an object drawing subsystem" 
  20. ^ US 5777621, Jevans, David, "Quality control mechanism for three-dimensional graphics rendering" 
  21. ^ US 5561752, Jevans, David, "Multipass graphics rendering method and apparatus with re-traverse flag" 

External links[edit]