David L. Bartlett

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David L. Bartlett (born February 16, 1941), an ordained minister of the American Baptist Churches, USA, is the J. Edward and Ruth Cox Lantz Professor Emeritus of Christian Communication at Yale Divinity School, and the Distinguished Professor Emeritus of New Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary.

Education[edit]

Bartlett completed his undergraduate education at Swarthmore College in 1962, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts. He then proceeded to attend Yale Divinity School where he earned a Bachelor of Divinity in 1967 and his Doctor of Philosophy from the Department of Religious Studies in New Testament in 1972.[1]

Professional career[edit]

Bartlett has had a long career, holding both academic and pastoral positions. As an ordained minister of the American Baptist Churches, USA he has served as the Senior Minister for congregations in Minnesota, Illinois, and California. He has also been on the faculty at schools such as American Baptist Seminary of the West and Graduate Theological Union, The Divinity School of The University of Chicago, Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, Virginia, Yale Divinity School, and Columbia Theological Seminary. At both Yale Divinity School and Columbia Theological Seminary he was a distinguished faculty member and was honored as professor emeritus. He was Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at Yale Divinity School for six years, and then Dean of Academic Affairs.

AHe served for several years on the Editorial Board of works such as Interpretation and Preaching Great Texts. He has also been on the Board of Consultants for the Journal of Religion and the National Advisory Board for the Christian Networks Journal.

He has worked on the Feasting on the Word commentary series. He along with Barbara Brown Taylor, were co-editors for this twelve volume series that aimed at giving pastors and educators a variety of views on scripture that could be easily utilized.[2]

Writings[edit]

Bartlett has written a number of books and scholarly articles. He has also contributed to a number of other works as editor.

These include:

  • Fact and Faith, Valley Forge: Judson Press, 1975. Reprinted, Eugene, OR, Wipf and Stock, 2007.
  • Paul’s Vision for the Teaching Church, Valley Forge: Judson Press 1977.
  • Adam’s New Friend and Other Stories (with Carol Bartlett), Valley Forge: Judson Press, 1980.
  • Bible Journeys: A Youth Resource (with Richard Orr), Valley Forge, Judson Press, 1980.
  • The Shape of Scriptural Authority, Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1983.
  • Moments of Commitment: Years of Growth (with Ruth Fowler), St. Louis: CBP, 1987.
  • Ministry in the New Testament (in Overtures to Biblical Theology), Minneapolis: Fortress-Augsburg, 1993.
  • Romans: Westminster Bible Companion, Louisville: Westminster/John Knox, 1995.
  • I Peter: New Interpreter’s Bible, Vol. 12, Nashville: Abingdon, 1997.
  • Between the Bible and the Church, Nashville: Abingdon, 1999.
  • Advent/Christmas in New Proclamation, Yearbook., Nashville: Abingdon 1999
  • What’s Good About This News? Preaching from the Gospels and Galatians (Expansion of the 2001 Beecher Lectures); Westminster/John Knox, 2003.
  • To All God’s Beloved in New Haven: David Bartlett’s Yale Sermons, ed. Ian Doescher, ExLibris, 2004.
  • Matthew in The Fourfold Gospel, London: SPCK, 2006; also published as: New Proclamation: The Fourfold Gospel, (Minneapolis:Fortress, 2006).
  • Editor, with Claudia Highbaugh and Stephen Murray, Crossing by Faith: Essays and Sermons in Honor of Harry Baker Adams (St. Louis: Chalice, 2003).
  • Co-editor with Barbara Brown Taylor, Lectionary Preaching Guide (twelve volumes).
  • Co-editor with Patrick D. Miller, Jr., Westminster Bible Companion, a series of commentaries from Westminster/John Knox, Louisville.
  • Co-Editor: Feasting on the Word: Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary, Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2008-2011

References[edit]

  1. ^ "David L. Bartlett" (PDF). Columbia Theological Seminary Faculty. Columbia Theological Seminary. 
  2. ^ "About this Project". FeastingontheWord.net. Feasting on the Word. 

External links[edit]