David Lloyd (musician)

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David Lloyd
Origin England
Genres Rock, indie pop, dance-rock
Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter, artist, musician, record producer
Years active 1980–present
Labels Worldwide: Arista Records Canada SPG Music
Associated acts Uropa Lula The Neighbourhood Talks, Playground, The Lovefield, Dumb Baby Sounds, John VII.

David Lloyd is an English singer, musician, songwriter, currently living in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Beginnings[edit]

David Lloyd is a multi-media artist/composer/singer from South Shields in the North East of England. Lloyd moved to London in 1976 to study at the Central School of Art and Design. Whilst still an art student, he played guitar in punk bands the Fauves and the Brides of Christ before singing in an early incarnation of The The with bassist Tom Johnson and drummer Peter Ashworth. In the late 70s Lloyd, under the pseudonym David Elliot, worked on the Snips album 'La Rocca'[1] with Chris Spedding, Midge Ure and Bill Nelson, writing one of the songs, "Happy Sometimes".[2]

Uropa Lula[edit]

In 1980 Lloyd formed Uropa Lula[3] with Hilde Swendgaard (Manager) and Kevin Smith (drums), making two short films, ‘Here in the Sun’ and ‘At Night Time’ with Video Active. They were joined by Colin Prior (bass) and Peter Fromm (keyboards) in 1981 and began performing live in London, opening for John Cale, Alternative TV and Depeche Mode.[4] American bass player Allan Dias,[5] replaced Prior in August of the same year. In September, the band recorded three songs, Here's a Medal,[6] Timber Fall I[7] and My Black Hour for the Nicky Horne Capital Radio show. Leeds born drummer Andrew Edge joined the group later that year. Uropa Lula signed to Arista Records in May 1982 and spent the rest of that year recording album tracks and their first two singles, 'Our Love Has Just Begun.'[8] and 'Fell Upon a Jewel'[9] at Trident Studios, The Manor Studio, Townhouse Studios and RAK Studios. To tie in with the release of the first single, the band recorded a live session for the David Jensen show on Radio 1 for the BBC. The session was produced by Dale Griffin, the English drummer and founding member of 1970s rock band, Mott the Hoople and featured two songs, Here's A Medal and Timber Fall I. A month later Uropa Lula returned to London's Capital Radio to record their second live session for the Nicky Horne show playing two songs, I Am My Older Brother and Leather and Metal (Winter's here). In the Fall of 1982, guitarist Chester Kamen[10] and keyboard player Carol Isaacs joined the group in time for tours of the UK and US in 1983.[11] The group's opening US show was at the The Ritz in New York (1 February 1982). This was followed by dates at the Mudd Club (7 February 1982), the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C., the New Jersey City Gardens and at show at the Brooklyn Zoo (26 February 1982) where they shared the bill with Holly and the Italians. Upon their return to the UK, on 2 June 1982 the group played at the Camden Palace (now called Koko) and opened for Big Country at the Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool (19 June 1982) and John Cale at the The Venue, Victoria, London (5 July 1982). With some irony, the band had by this point changed their name to Viva Lula and as part of the promotion of their third single, Dad Sings the Blues,[12] they toured the UK with Big Country in June 1983.[13] Lloyd disbanded the group in October 1983 and embarked on a solo career, albeit continuing to work with Uropa Lula members Kamen, Dias and Smith throughout the 80s.

Singles[edit]

Uropa Lula released three singles on Arista Records:

"Our Love Has Just Begun" B/W "I've Suddenly Remembered Something" (ARIST476, 1982) as Uropa Lula.[14]

"Fell Upon A Jewel" B/W "She Appears to Vanish" (ARIST498, 1983) as Uropa Lula.[15]

"Dad Sings The Blues" B/W "Surely There Must Be Some Mistake" (ARIST 540, July 1983) as Viva Lula.[16][17]

Album[edit]

"Our Love Has Just Begun" featured on Hardest Hits Volume 1[18] (SPG001) Released by SPG Music Productions in 1991.

The Neighbourhood Talks[edit]

After Uropa Lula, Lloyd began work on The Neighbourhood Talks, a solo project that continued through to the end of the 1990s, producing five albums. Lloyd continued to work with ex Uropa Lula members, Dias, Kamen and Smith, whilst bringing in a number of other musicians who would contribute to the project including vocalists Pepsi Demacque, Carole Rowley,[19] Sony Southern, Janet Sewell and Carmalita Wyatte; guitarists Maurice Michaels and Chris Pye; Simon Etchel on keyboards and Bimbo Acock on saxophone. This project led to Lloyd singing on the motion picture soundtrack of the Rafal Zielinski film Recruits featuring as lead vocalist on "Temptation" and the title track "Recruits". In 1994 "The Sacrifice of Love"[20] a song written by Lloyd and performed the Neighbourhood Talks, was included on the soundtrack of the motion picture Funny Man. He sang on numerous TV commercials during the 1980s including those for Coca Cola, Halifax Building Society, BASF Audio, British Gas and Southern Water. In 1992 Lloyd co-wrote and performed Really Something[21] with Kamen as ‘The Playground’ for the motion picture Split Second.

The Lovefield[edit]

As the principle producer, singer, songwriter and instrumentalist and only official member of the,[22][23] Lloyd was solely responsible for the projects direction, although in 1992 he collaborated with Sep Cipriano (Keyboards), Mitch Horner (Bass) and ex Gail Ann Dorsey guitarist Bub Roberts[24] (Guitar) for a number of low key live Lovefield performances. In 2009 Lloyd made the Lovefield[25] catalogue available for the first time.

Dumb Baby Sounds[edit]

In 2010 Lloyd, by now living in Newcastle (UK), began recording again, covering the Nine Inch Nails song, "Hurt" and the Velvet Underground's "Femme Fatale". Later that year, Lloyd made the films Blue Parade and "Chills" as the first steps of a new multimedia project Dumb Baby Sounds.[26] In June 2011 Lloyd made the film "At the End of Everything" for a song of the same name. Lloyd is the principle producer, singer, songwriter and instrumentalist in Dumb Baby Sounds. Rain Dancing,[27] released on 9 September 2011 was the Dumb Baby Sounds debut single. The follow-up, World on Fire,[28] was released on 23 April 2012. Both songs were written and produced by David Lloyd. An accompanying film using the montage work of Dumb Baby Sounds guitarist, Johnny Seven was made to accompany the release of World on Fire. In November 2012 Lloyd wrote, produced and performed Dress Me Good editing and creating the images to accompany the composition. In December of the same year Lloyd produced the John VII – Seven Minutes project,[29] a collection of seven separate pieces, all one minute long, written and recorded in seven days. The Seven Minutes EP was made available as a legal free download on Soundcloud .

John VII[edit]

In 2013 Lloyd, having been the guiding force behind 2012's Seven Minutes project,[30] focussed on creating John VII as an offshoot to Dumb Baby Sounds. The first single In Babylon was given a world wide release on 31 January 2013. The third John VII single Dress Me Good[31] was released on 29 July. Lloyd is the sole producer/composer behind the John VII project.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snips - La Rocca! (Vinyl, LP, Album)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  2. ^ "Happy Sometimes - Snips | Song Info". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  3. ^ "Uropa Lula — Free listening, videos, concerts, stats and pictures at". Last.fm. 2012-08-12. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  4. ^ "Depeche Mode London, The Pits, 30 Apr 1981 – Songkick". Songkick.com. 1981-04-30. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  5. ^ "PiL People Bios | Allan Dias". Fodderstompf.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  6. ^ "HERE'S A MEDAL (Live Capital Radio Session) by UROPA LULA | Free Listening on SoundCloud". Soundcloud.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  7. ^ "TIMBER FALL I (Live Capital Radio Session) by UROPA LULA | Free Listening on SoundCloud". Soundcloud.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  8. ^ "Uropa Lula". Fade 2 Grey. 2012-02-05. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  9. ^ "Uropa Lula - Fell Upon A Jewel (Vinyl)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  10. ^ ""Chester Kamen" Music Videos". Ovguide.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  11. ^ "BIG COUNTRY'S BBC PERFORMANCES RELEASED ON NEW BOX SET — The Official website of Big Country". Bigcountry.co.uk. 2013-07-29. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  12. ^ "Viva Lula". Fade 2 Grey. 2012-03-22. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  13. ^ Milburn, Trev (14 May 2009). "Official Big Country Forum". Big Country. Retrieved 12 April 2010. 
  14. ^ "Our Love Has Just Begun". discogs. Retrieved 8 April 2010. 
  15. ^ [1][dead link]
  16. ^ "Dad Sings the Blues". 45cat. Retrieved 7 April 2010. 
  17. ^ "Dad Sings the Blues cover". Vinyltap. Retrieved 18 May 2008. 
  18. ^ "Various - Hardest Hits Volume 1 (CD)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  19. ^ "Carole Rowley - Tout Pour Ma Cherie (Vinyl)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  20. ^ "THE SACRIFICE OF LOVE (The Neighbourhood Talks) by UROPA LULA". Soundcloud.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  21. ^ "REALLY SOMETHING (Playground- Movie Soundtrack) by UROPA LULA". Soundcloud.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  22. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20120328101653/http://lovefield.moonfruit.com/. Archived from the original on 28 March 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2011.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  23. ^ "LOVEFIELD | Free Listening on SoundCloud". Soundcloud.com. 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  24. ^ "Bub Roberts Discography". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  25. ^ "David Lloyd – Lovefield". Bebo. Retrieved 8 April 2010. 
  26. ^ [2] Archived 7 February 2011 at the Wayback Machine.
  27. ^ "Rain Dancing (Single) by Dumb Baby Sounds". Rhapsody.com. 2011-09-09. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  28. ^ "Dumb Baby Sounds | World On Fire | CD Baby Music Store". Cdbaby.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  29. ^ "John VII | Free Listening on SoundCloud". Soundcloud.com. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 
  30. ^ [3] Archived 4 November 2013 at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^ "BBC Radio 2 - Alex Lester, Lace Me Shirt". Bbc.co.uk. 2013-06-19. Retrieved 2016-01-17. 

External links[edit]