David M. Camp

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David M. Camp

David M. Camp (April 21, 1788 – February 20, 1871) was a Vermont attorney and politician who served as Lieutenant Governor from 1836 to 1841 under Governor Silas H. Jennison.

Biography[edit]

David Manning Camp was born in Tunbridge, Vermont on April 21, 1788. He graduated from the University of Vermont in 1810, and in 1813 moved to Derby to become a US Customs Collector.[1][2][3]

Camp subsequently studied law, attained admission to the bar, and became an attorney in Newport. He served as Orleans County State's Attorney in 1815. He was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1825 to 1826 and 1834 to 1835. Camp also served as Orleans County Assistant Judge from 1830 to 1832 and 1834 to 1835.[4]

Camp became a Whig when that party was founded and served as Lieutenant Governor from 1836 to 1841. He was the first Lieutenant Governor elected after the creation of the Vermont Senate, and so the first Lieutenant Governor to serve as President of the Senate.[5][6][7]

He was a Delegate to the 1839 Whig national convention.[8] After serving as Lieutenant Governor Camp won election to the Vermont Senate, serving from 1842 to 1844.[9]

Camp served as Orleans County Assistant Judge again in 1843, and also served as Orleans County Superintendent of Schools.[10]

In the 1850s Camp relocated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin where his son Hoel H. Camp was a prominent banker and businessman. He returned to Vermont in the 1860s, settling in Derby Line, where he lived in retirement.[11]

Camp died in Derby Line on February 20, 1871.[12][13] He was buried in Derby Center Cemetery.[14]

Family[edit]

David M. Camp's nephew, also named David M. Camp, was Clerk of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1869 to 1878 and also served as a member of the Vermont House.[15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Hartford, Vermont, July 4, 1761-April 4, 1889, by William Howard Tucker, 1889, pages 354 to 355
  2. ^ A Gazetteer of the State of Vermont, by Zadock Thompson, 1824, page 116
  3. ^ General Catalogue of the University of Vermont, published by the university, 1901, page 39
  4. ^ Biography of the Bar of Orleans County, Vermont, by Frederick W. Baldwin, 1886, pages 59 to 64
  5. ^ Early History of Vermont, by LaFayette Wilbur, Volume 2, 1900, page 407
  6. ^ The History of Vermont: With Descriptions, Physical and Topographical, by Hosea Beckley, 1846, page 183
  7. ^ Lieutenant Governors, Terms of Service, Office of the Vermont Secretary of State, Archives and Records Administration, 2011, page 1
  8. ^ Vermont: The Green Mountain State, by Walter Hill Crockett, Volume 3, 1921, page 306
  9. ^ History of Bank of Orleans, Irasburgh National Bank of Orleans, Barton National Bank, Barton Savings Bank, and Barton Savings Bank and Trust Company, edited by Frederick W. Baldwin, 1916, pages 103 to 104
  10. ^ The Vermont Historical Gazetteer, edited by Abby Maria Hemenway, Volume 3, 1877, pages 33 to 34
  11. ^ The Genealogical and Biographical History of the Manning Families, by William Henry Manning, 1902, pages 251 to 252
  12. ^ Death notice, David M. Camp, North Star newspaper, Danville, March 3, 1871
  13. ^ Obituary, David M. Camp, Anglo-American Times, March 11, 1871
  14. ^ Gravestone photo by contributor Bill McKern, David M. Camp page, Find A Grave web site, September 1, 2008
  15. ^ Joint Rules, Rules and Orders of the Senate and House of Representatives, published by Vermont Secretary of State], 1878, page 117
  16. ^ Acts and Resolves Passed by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont, published by Vermont General Assembly, 1867, page 377
Political offices
Preceded by
Silas H. Jennison
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
1836–1841
Succeeded by
Waitstill R. Ranney