David O. McKay School of Education

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The David O. McKay School of Education, which was named after David O. McKay, operates one of the largest teacher preparation programs in the United States.

The school specializes in teaching, administration, communication disorders, and educational inquiry. The McKay School is located on the southwest end of Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah, and is housed in the David O. McKay Building. The school was founded as the College of Education, and it was renamed the David O. McKay School of Education in 1998.[1]

The David O. McKay Building, as seen from the southeast.

History[edit]

The David O. McKay School of Education began in 1913; it was named the Church Teachers College,[2]and Edwin S. Hinckley was the first dean.[3] It was renamed the School of Education in 1920 and in 1921 became the College of Education.[4]

In 1954, the undergraduate majors outside of elementary education and early-childhood education were shifted into the colleges of their specific discipline, and the Department of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation was made into a college separate from the College of Education. Since then, the College of Education has only offered educational methods courses for those majors.[5] In 2009 the physical education teaching/coaching major was moved back into the McKay School with the dissolution of the College of Health and Human Performance.

The College of Education was renamed the David O. McKay School of Education in 1998.[6]

Departments[edit]

The David O. McKay School of Education has seven departments: Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling; Communication Disorders; Counseling Psychology and Special Education; Educational Inquiry, Measurement, and Evaluation; Educational Leadership and Foundations; Instructional Psychology and Technology; and Teacher Education.

Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling (CITES)[edit]

The Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling focuses on improving educators and schools. CITES manages teacher preparation of secondary education majors in other BYU colleges well as the five public school districts in the BYU–Public Schools Partnership.[7]

Communication Disorders (ComD)[edit]

The Department of Communication Disorders specializes in expanding knowledge of clinical practice through teaching, research, and clinical service.[8] The Communication Disorders Department offers bachelor's and master's degrees in communication disorders. The department also manages the BYU Speech and Language Clinic, which offers evaluations and treatment services in the areas of speech, language, voice, fluency, and aural rehabilitation.

Counseling Psychology & Special Education (CPSE)[edit]

The goal of the Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education (CPSE) is to prepare special education and psychology professionals to work in educational settings.[9] The Counseling Psychology and Special Education Department offers bachelor's and master's degrees in special education as well as an educational specialist degree in school psychology and a doctorate in counseling psychology.[10]

In 2016, the department's School Psychology program, a program that trains school psychologists, was ranked the number one program out of 136 U.S. school psychology programs for its faculty research productivity. Three CPSE faculty were listed among the top 25 school psychology researchers in the U.S.[11]

Educational Inquiry, Measurement, & Evaluation (EIME)[edit]

The Educational Inquiry, Measurement, and Evaluation program is a PhD degree offered to students who have completed a specific set of master's level courses. Students may also be admitted if they are able to demonstrate proficiency in the subject matter of these courses through personal experience.

The EIME program prepares students to work not only as professors, but as researchers, assessment specialists, and other related capacities.[12]

Educational Leadership & Foundations (EdLF)[edit]

The Educational Leadership and Foundations Department offers a MEd in school leadership and an EdD in educational leadership. The department also recently added the Educational Policy and Social Foundations master's program.[13]

Students who graduate with these degrees often work as principals or other school leaders in the education system. The skills they develop in the EdLF program are meant to help them "improve the equity and quality of teaching and learning environments throughout the world."[14]

Instructional Psychology & Technology (IP&T)[edit]

The Instructional Psychology and Technology Department's mission is to "pursue knowledge and skills in instructional design, research, measurement, evaluation, and theory; to apply knowledge and technology to solve instructional problems; and to strive to live, learn, and teach by the spirit."[15] Students in this department are pursuing either a master's or a PhD in instructional psychology and technology.

Teacher Education (TEd)[edit]

The Teacher Education Department offers degrees in elementary education, early childhood education, secondary education, physical education/teacher education, and teacher education.[16] The department's mission is to "promote excellence in education by preparing noble educators, engaging in educational scholarship, and serving in our communities."[17]

Educator Preparation Program (EPP)[edit]

Through the Educator Preparation Program, the McKay School of Education coordinates teacher education courses and training for all secondary education undergraduates at BYU. The McKay School provides educator courses in all of its departments and offers support to these seven other colleges that participate in the EPP:[18]

  • Engineering and Technology
  • Family, Home, and Social Sciences
  • Fine Arts and Communications
  • Biology and Agriculture
  • Humanities
  • Life Sciences
  • Physical and Mathematical Sciences

BYU—Public School Partnership (BYU-PSP)[edit]

Since 1984, the Public School Partnership has facilitated collaboration between the McKay School of Education, five Utah school districts (Alpine, Jordan, Nebo, Provo, and Wasatch) and the arts and sciences colleges and departments at BYU that participate in preparing K–12 educators.[19] The Partnership includes more than 7,000 teachers and approximately 180,000 students. BYU and the McKay School graduate approximately 800 certified teachers each year, many of whom receive student-teacher training at schools in the BYU-PSP.

Every year the Partnership sponsors English as a second language (ESL) endorsement training (TELL); local and regional science fairs such as the Central Utah Science and Engineering Fair (CUSEF); local, national, and international internships; research for the Positive Behavior Support Initiative (PBSI); and comprehensive mathematics and literacy education.

Endorsements and training[edit]

The McKay School offers students endorsements in the areas of reading, gifted and talented, special education, and teaching English language learners. Student teaching opportunities are available locally within the BYU–Public School Partnership, as well as nationally in Houston and Washington, DC, and internationally in China. There are also a limited number of year-long internships available on a competitive basis.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Brigham Young University and the David O. McKay School of Education". BYU History. L. Tom Perry Special Collections. Retrieved 7 August 2017. 
  2. ^ Report of the Commissioner of Education for the Year Ended June 30, 1913, Vol. 1. US Bureau of Education. 1914. p. 412. Retrieved 7 August 2017. 
  3. ^ "Contributions of the Class of 1891: Edwin S. Hinckley". BYU History. L. Tom Perry Special Collections. Retrieved 7 August 2017. 
  4. ^ Ernest L. Wilkinson, ed., Brigham Young University: The First One Hundred Years. (Provo: Brigham Young University Press, 1975) Vol. 2, p. 776, ISBN 9780842507080
  5. ^ Wilkinson, Ernest L., ed. (1975). Brigham Young University: the first one hundred years. 2. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press. pp. 641–643. ISBN 9780842507080. Retrieved 13 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Brigham Young University and the David O. McKay School of Education". Harold B. Lee Library. L. Tom Perry Special Collections. Retrieved 24 August 2017. 
  7. ^ "Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education & Schooling (CITES) | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  8. ^ "Communication Disorders | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  9. ^ "Counseling Psychology & Special Education (CPSE) | McKay School of Education". David O. McKay School of Education. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  10. ^ ""Degrees Offered."". David O. McKay School of Education. Retrieved 10 August 2017. 
  11. ^ McBride, Jon. ""BYU school psychology program honored nationally for quantity and quality of research"". BYU News. Brigham Young University Communications. Retrieved 10 August 2017. 
  12. ^ "Educational Inquiry, Measurement, & Evaluation, PhD (EIME) | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  13. ^ Swart, Janine. "Resumption of the EPSF Program". David O. McKay School of Education. Retrieved 25 August 2017. 
  14. ^ "Educational Leadership & Foundations (EdLF) | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  15. ^ "Instructional Psychology & Technology (IP&T) | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  16. ^ "Teacher Education (Ted)". David O. McKay School of Education. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
  17. ^ "Teacher Education (TEd) | McKay School of Education". Education.byu.edu. 2015-04-13. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  18. ^ "Overview of the Educator Preparation Program". David O. McKay School of Education. Brigham Young University. Retrieved 25 August 2017. 
  19. ^ "BYU–Public School Partnership". David O. McKay School of Education. Brigham Young University. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°14′50″N 111°39′07″W / 40.24722°N 111.65194°W / 40.24722; -111.65194