David Savan

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David Savan (1916 – 1992) was an eminent semiotician and Charles Sanders Peirce scholar. His works were focused on epistemological questions and Baruch Spinoza's philosophy of language.[1]

He was a Professor in the University of Toronto, Philosophy Department, 1943–1981. When he joined the faculty, Savan was immediately noted for evaluating George Sidney Brett's fourth-year modern philosophy course.[2]

He was the first recipient of the Thomas A. Sebeok fellowship.[3]

Savan has influenced several modern philosophers. These include Jean Fisette and his attempt to understand clinical data that are associated with the pathology of both linguistic and narrative competencies.[4] His positions, however, also have their own critics. For instance, his notion of Ground and his interpretation of sign as a single concept have been challenged by T.L. Short.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sebeok, Thomas A.; Umiker-Sebeok, Jean (2012-12-06). The Semiotic Sphere. New York: Plenum Press. p. 64. ISBN 978-1-4757-0207-1.
  2. ^ Slater, John G. (2005). Minerva's Aviary: Philosophy at Toronto, 1843-2003. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. p. 273. ISBN 0-8020-3870-0.
  3. ^ Deely, John (2005). "Sign Systems Studies". 33 (2): 477–480. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ Sebeok, Thomas A.; Umiker-Sebeok, Jean (1987). The Semiotic Web 1986. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. p. 198. ISBN 089925215X.
  5. ^ Sebeok, Thomas A.; Umiker-Sebeok, Jean (2018-07-12). The Semiotic Web 1986. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. p. 198. ISBN 089925215X.

External links[edit]