Day of Archaeology

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The Day of Archaeology is an annual, 24-hour, international online event in which archaeologists and those in related fields write blog posts about their work. It was inspired by the Day of Digital Humanities[1] and, similarly, allows practitioners of many kinds, to document their work informally and 'provide a window into the daily lives of archaeologists from all over the world'.[2] Though it encourages diversity rather than thematic posts, the project has some similarities to Blog Action Day.

Overview[edit]

The first event took place on 27 July 2011. The event is organised by a voluntary committee of archaeologists based in the United Kingdom, United States of America and Spain.[1] The main site runs a customised WordPress content management system and the event is promoted through Twitter and Facebook pages (see External links).

The project is supported by several British archaeological and academic organisations: server space is provided on the Portable Antiquities Scheme servers[3] and long-term digital preservation is provided by the Archaeology Data Service. L-P Archaeology and the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities provide technical and management advice.[1] In 2011 and 2013 the event was timed to coincide with the Festival of British Archaeology.[4]

The project covers any form of work that could be considered archaeology and encourages contributions from any level of professionalism.[2]

External coverage[edit]

Several archaeologists have blogged about the project in official[5] and personal[6] capacities and the project committee wrote posts on various other sites,[3][7] notably the Society for Historical Archaeology[8] and the British Museum.[9]

After the 2011 event a preliminary data mining analysis was conducted.[10]

The Day of Archaeology project was nominated for a British Archaeology Award in July 2011 in the 'Best Representation of Archaeology in the Media' category and was highly commended.[11]

Event summaries[edit]

Year Date Number of participants Number of countries Number of posts
2013 26 July 1067 Not known 329
2012 29 June over 300 Not known 343
2011 27 July over 400 Not known 429
2014 11 July
2015 24 July

Data sources:[2][7][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Day of Archaeology: Project Background". 2013. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  2. ^ a b c "Day of Archaeology: About the Project". 2013. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  3. ^ a b Pett, Daniel (2011-04-28). "Portable Antiquities Scheme: Day of Archaeology 2011". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  4. ^ "Festival Listing: Day of Archaeology". Council for British Archaeology. July 2013. Retrieved 29 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "RCAHMS: Day of Archaeology 2012". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  6. ^ "Netzschichten: Day of Archaeology". 2011-07-28. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  7. ^ a b Richardson, Lorna (2012-05-30). "UCL Centre for Digital Humanities: Day of Archaeology 2012". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  8. ^ Pett, Daniel (2012-06-22). "Society for Historical Archaeology: The Day of Archaeology 2012". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  9. ^ Pett, Daniel (2011-07-27). "A day in the life of a lot of archaeologists". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  10. ^ Graham, Shawn (2012-07-09). "Electric Archaeology: Mining a Day of Archaeology". Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  11. ^ "British Archaeology Awards 2012". 2012-07-09. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  12. ^ The Day of Archaeology Team (1 August 2013). "Wrapping Up the Day of Archaeology 2013". Retrieved 30 October 2013. 

External links[edit]