Daybreak (Ayumi Hamasaki song)

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For other songs named Daybreak, see Daybreak.
"Daybreak"
Daybreak2.jpg
Single by Ayumi Hamasaki
from the album I am...
Released March 6, 2002
Format JPN CD Single
United States Digital Single [1]
Genre J-pop, pop rock (Album version)
Trip hop, dark ambient (Hal"s Mix 2002)
Length 58:02
Label Avex Trax
Writer(s) Ayumi Hamasaki (lyrics)
CREA + DAI + junichi matsuda (music)
Ayumi Hamasaki singles chronology
"A Song Is Born"
(2001)
"Daybreak"
(2002)
"Free & Easy"
(2002)

"Daybreak" is a song recorded by Japanese recording artist and lyricist Ayumi Hamasaki, released on March 6, 2002 as the eighth and final single on her fourth studio album I am.... Influenced by the recent events off the September 11 attacks in New York City and Washington D.C. in North America, Hamasaki sought a new inspiration for her then-forthcoming album; instead off writing songs about confusion, loneliness and love like her previous efforts, she was encouraged to engage in more peaceful and worldly themes. This resulted in several songs on I Am..., including "Daybreak".

Musically, there are two versions; the album version which is influenced by pop rock and Americanized alternative rock music, while the single version utilizes synthpop, trip hop and dark ambient music. The lyrical content talks about achievement and self-empowerment. Upon the release, "Daybreak" received mixed to favorable reviews from most music critics, who had praised Hamasaki's vocal abilities and likened the production, while critics were divided with the single version and lack of innovation. An accompanying music video was shot by Wataru Takeishi for the single version, which featured Hamasaki walking on deserted highway in early hours off the morning.

Commercially, "Daybreak" had fair charting response in her native Japan. The song debuted at number two on both Daily and Weekly Oricon chart, becoming her first single to miss the top spot since "Audience". Although certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ), it remained her last single to not peak at number one for over a decade until it was surpassed by her 2013 recording "Feel the Love/Merry-Go-Round" at number five. That was also surpassed by the following single "Terminal".

Background[edit]

On New Years Day 2002, Hamasaki had released her fourth studio album I am.... During the album process, Hamasaki had learnt about the breaking news off the September 11 attacks in 2001, that had hit New York City and the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The attack itself had killed 2,507 civilians, 72 law enforcement officers, 343 firefighters, and 55 military personnel and caused at least $10 billion in property and infrastructure damage.[2] Because off this, Hamasaki had sought a new inspiration for her then-forthcoming album; instead off writing songs about confusion, loneliness and love like her previous efforts, she was encouraged to engage in more peaceful and worldly themes.[3][4][5] The response was positively received from the Japanese audience and became successful in her native Japan, selling over 2.3 million units in Japan and was certified triple million by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments of three million copies.[6]

The album's singles were very successful. The lead single "M" became Hamasaki's fourth million-selling single.[A][7][8] After the successful feat, the following singles "Evolution", "Never Ever", "Endless Sorrow", "Unite!" and "Dearest" had all sold over 500,000 copies in Japan, becoming her first and only studio album to contain all over 500,000 selling official singles.[9][10][11][12][13] After the success off the singles, Hamasaki begun work on her studio album Rainbow and had geared up to promote it with "Free & Easy", so Hamasaki released the album's final single and only limited edition single "Daybreak".

Composition and release[edit]

"Daybreak" was written by Hamasaki herself, like the rest off the I Am... album and produced by long-time collaborator Max Matsuura.[14] There are two official versions; the album version and the single version. The album version was composed by Hamasaki, Dai "D.A.I." Nagao and additional production by Junichi Matsuda, while the song was arranged and mixed by Tasuku.[14] "Daybreak" was out off twelve songs composed by Hamasaki, which I Am... also became her first studio album to assert full creative control over; this song was her only collaboration with Matsuda on the album.[14] The album version contains less instrumentation that the single edit and focuses on simple guitar and drum instruments.[15] A pop rock and alternative rock song that resembles Western music elements, the song was noted as being "darker" and "harder" than the single version.[15] Jeff from Random.Access Music commented that the production and composition off the music was similar to "generic North American pop-punk-rock band [...]"[16]

Regarding the single version, the song was composed and remixed by HAL.[14] Yolanda from Music Addiction observed that "They took the original song [Daybreak], threw out the electric guitar (in fact they deleted all the rock elements) and made it a steady synthpop song.[17] "Daybreak" was released as the eighth and final single from I am... and the only limited edition single on March 6, 2002. Linited to only 300,000 copies, the song was released as a compact disc by Avex Trax and featured ten tracks.[18] For the cover artwork, the sleeve was shot by Shinichi Hara, art design was handled by Shigeru Kasai and was officially directed by Yasuyuki Tomita.[18] "Daybreak" became her last single to feature more than eight songs of remixes or instrumentals, with her 2003 single "No Way to Say" having four orchestral, one instrumental and one remix and her 2008 single "Rule/Sparkle" having two remixes and two instrumentals.[19][20]

Reception[edit]

Hamasaki's single "Terminal" (pictured) is now her lowest-charting single on Oricon, which was previously held by "Daybreak", "Poker Face" and "Feel the Love/Merry go Round".

"Daybreak" received mixed to favorable reviews from most music critics. Jeff from Random.Access was mixed in his review for "Daybreak", commenting that the song resembled "generic North American pop-punk-rock bands [...]" by exampling My Chemical Romance.[16] He did, however fell that her "more feminine vocals" shine through.[16] Yolanda from the online publication Music Addiction awarded the CD three star out of five. Despite being more satisfied with the album version, she said "'HΛL’s Mix 2002' is another good creation from HΛL’s team, although most of their remixes are a hit or miss [...] I like it, but the album version is more my thing."[17] She was critical on the remixes and concluded " I must say it wasn’t her best, but also not her worst. [...] It was kinda weird though that the original version of this single’s A-side wasn’t even featured here, the rock version of Daybreak on the album remains the very best version."[17] Hamasaki had hosted an online voting poll for fans to choose their favorite tracks to be featured on her Ayumi Hamasaki 15th Anniversary Tour ~Best Live Tour~. As a result, "Daybreak" was added to the set-list off the tour.[21]

Commercially, the song performed fairly well on Oricon. The song debuted at number two on the Oricon Daily Chart, which caused concern that the single would not top the weekly performance. In its first charting week, "Daybreak" debuted at number two on the Oricon Weekly Chart with over 113,000 copies sold. This became her first single since "Audience" in 2000 to have stalled at the second position.[22] The song stayed in the chart for nine weeks, and was placed at number fifty-seven on the Oricon Yearly Chart. The song was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments off 100,000 units.[23]

"Daybreak" became Hamasaki's final single to have missed the top position on Oricon for almost eleven years until this record was surpassed by her 2013 single "Feel the Love/Merry-Go-Round", which peaked at number five on the Oricon Weekly Chart, failed to receive a certification and became Hamasaki's lowest charting single on that date.[24] This record was then surpassed by her second single "Terminal" in 2014, where it peaked at number twenty-four, her first ever single to have peaked outside the top ten and twenty since her debut single "Poker Face", sixteen years later.[25]

Promotion[edit]

The music video premiered in Japan on February 6, 2002. The music video used the remix of Hal's 2002 Version. The video, which was directed by Wataru Takeishi features Hamasaki on a deserted highway in the early morning. She is wearing heavy makeup and a torn white dress. At the end of the video she begins to walk away from the camera.

The "Hal's mix" of Daybreak was used in commercials for the Lumix camera of Panasonic. Hamasaki appeared in the advert video.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Daybreak" (Hal's Mix 2002)
  2. "No More Words" (Brent Mini'S Rotary Mix)
  3. "I Am..." (Night Clubbers mix)
  4. "No More Words" (Nicely Nice remix)
  5. "I Am..." (Ram's Special 11Days Mix)
  6. "No More Words" (Turn Up the Break mix)
  7. "I Am..." (Huge Fairy Tale mix)
  8. "No More Words" (Laugh & Peace Mix)
  9. "Daybreak" (Hal's Mix 2002) (Instrumental)
  10. "Opening Run" (CMJK's extended mix)

Charts, peaks and positions[edit]

Oricon positions[edit]

Chart (2000) Peak
position
Oricon Daily Chart 2
Oricon Weekly Chart 2
Oricon Yearly Chart 57

Sales and certifications[edit]

Region First Week Certification Shipments
Japan (RIAJ)[23] 113,170 Gold 200,000

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "M" received a 3× Platinum certification for 1,200,000 copies, however the 3× Platinum threshold was redefined as 750,000 copies in 2003.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewArtist?id=73951471
  2. ^ "How much did the September 11 terrorist attack cost America?". 2004. Institute for the Analysis of Global Security. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  3. ^ Tsuriya, Takako (May 2008). "Ayu 10th Year Career Anniversary". Cawaii (in Japanese): 15, 18. 
  4. ^ "A Song for XX". Beatfreak (in Japanese) 132. January 1999.
  5. ^ Takeuchi Cullen, Lisa (March 25, 2002). "I have very clear ideas of what I want". Time. p. 1. Archived from the original on February 14, 2008. Retrieved February 16, 2008. 
  6. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2002年1月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. January 2002 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 508: 12. March 10, 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 16, 2014. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  7. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2000年12月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. December 2000 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 495: 8. February 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 16, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  8. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年1月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. January 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 496: 8. March 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 2, 2013. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  9. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年2月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. February 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 497: 8. April 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 17, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  10. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年4月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. April 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 499: 8. November 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 17, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  11. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年5月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. June 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 500: 8. August 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 3, 2013. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  12. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年7月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. July 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 502: 8. September 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 8, 2012. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  13. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2001年10月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. October 2001 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 505: 17. January 10, 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 22, 2014. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b c d Liner notes from I am... by Ayumi Hamasaki, January 2002.
  15. ^ a b http://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/28402/Ayumi-Hamasaki-I-am.../
  16. ^ a b c random.access // music review // ayumi hamasaki - i am.... Jeff, Retrieved in 2004.
  17. ^ a b c Ayumi Hamasaki - Daybreak | Music Addiction. Retrieved in 2015.
  18. ^ a b Liner notes from Daybreak (CD) by Ayumi Hamasaki, March 2002.
  19. ^ Back and inner notes of No Way to Say (CD) by Ayumi Hamasaki, December 2003.
  20. ^ Back and inner notes of Rule/Sparkle (CD) by Ayumi Hamasaki, December 2008.
  21. ^ http://avexnet.or.jp/ayu/abestlive/
  22. ^ "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2000年11月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. November 2000 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 494: 9. January 10, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 17, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2002年3月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. March 2002 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 510: 12. May 10, 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 17, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Daybreak/浜崎あゆみ-レビュー一覧-ORICON STYLE ミュージック". oricon.co.jp. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  25. ^ Terminal (in Japanese). Oricon. Retrieved October 7, 2014. 

External links[edit]