de Havilland Engine Company

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de Havilland Engine Company
Industry Aerospace engineering
Fate Merged with Bristol Siddeley
Successor Bristol Siddeley
Founded 1944
Defunct 1961
Headquarters Leavesden, Watford, UK
Key people
Frank Halford (Designer)
Products Aircraft engines
Parent de Havilland Aircraft Company

The de Havilland Engine Company was an offshoot of the de Havilland aircraft building company, which started life as the 'Engine Division of the de Havilland Aircraft Company' in 1926 producing the famous de Havilland Gipsy aero-engine.[1] The company was merged with Bristol Siddeley (BSEL) engines in 1961 with BSEL subsequently becoming part of Rolls-Royce Limited in 1968.

History[edit]

The company was officially formed at Stag Lane in February 1944 and later moved into a factory leased by the government in 1946 at Leavesden, which had earlier been a site for Handley Page Halifax production.[2] This is now the location of Leavesden Film Studios.

It went on to produce one of the early turbojet engines the de Havilland Goblin which saw service in the early post-war de Havilland Vampire fighter. The later Ghost turbojet propelled early versions of the de Havilland Comet jetliner and the de Havilland Venom fighter.

The company later developed the de Havilland Gnome turboshaft under licence from the General Electric T58 design, but the company was absorbed into Bristol Siddeley engines in 1961; Bristol Siddeley itself subsequently merged with Rolls-Royce Limited in 1968 and the merged company continued with the Rolls Royce name.

Engines[edit]

Piston engines[edit]

A de Havilland Gipsy Queen at the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford

Turbojets[edit]

Turboshafts[edit]

Rocket engines[edit]

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gunston 1989, p.49.
  2. ^ Lumsden 2003, p.136.
  • Gunston, Bill. World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines. Cambridge, England. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1989. ISBN 1-85260-163-9
  • Lumsden, Alec. British Piston Engines and their Aircraft. Marlborough, Wiltshire: Airlife Publishing, 2003. ISBN 1-85310-294-6.

External links[edit]