Deakin University

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Deakin University
Deakin University Logo.png
Type Public
Established 1974
Chancellor John Stanhope
Vice-Chancellor Jane den Hollander
Academic staff
1,881
Administrative staff
2,150
Students 50,644[1]
Undergraduates 35,821
Postgraduates 12,565
Address Victoria, Australia
Campus Suburban
Affiliations ASAIHL, Australian National Business Schools[2]
Website www.deakin.edu.au

Deakin University is a public university with approximately 50,644 higher education students in 2014. Established in 1974, the University was named after the leader of the Australian federation movement and the nation's second Prime Minister, Alfred Deakin. It has campuses in Geelong, Warrnambool and Burwood, Melbourne and learning centres in Dandenong, Craigieburn and Werribee,[3] all in the state of Victoria. It was formally established in 1974 with the passage of the Deakin University Act 1974.[4] The sale of Stonnington Mansion provoked public outrage as it involved the mansion which was at risk of redevelopment by property developers.[5] Deakin is one of Australia's fastest growing research universities.[6] Its combined research funding had increased from A$4.5 million in 1997 to A$43.4 million in 2014.[6]

University rankings
Deakin University
QS World[7] 324
QS Arts & Humanities[8] 249
QS Engineering & Tech.[9] 313
QS Life Sciences & Medicine[10] 283
QS Social Sciences & Mgmt.[11] 139
THE-WUR World[12] 301-350
ARWU World[13] 301-400
CWTS Leiden World[14] 325
Australian rankings
QS National[15] 19
ARWU National[16] 19
CWTS Leiden National[14] 17

Notable Alumni[edit]

Notable alumni include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deakin University - MyUniversity". Australian Government. 
  2. ^ "Deakin Business School". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  3. ^ "Deakin Learning Centres". www.deakin.edu.au. Retrieved 2015-04-27. 
  4. ^ "DEAKIN UNIVERSITY ACT 1974". Australasian Legal Information Institute. 
  5. ^ "Preserve historic mansion, cry defiant residents". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research) Office (6 July 2011). "Deakin Research". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  7. ^ "QS World University Rankings 2015/16". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  8. ^ "QS World University Arts & Humanities Rankings 2015". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  9. ^ "QS World University Engineering & Technology Rankings 2015". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  10. ^ "QS World University Life Sciences & Medicine Rankings 2015". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  11. ^ "QS World University Social Sciences & Management Rankings 2015". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  12. ^ "World University Rankings 2015-2016". TSL Education Limited. 
  13. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015". Shanghai Ranking Consultancy. 
  14. ^ a b "CWTS Leiden Ranking 2014". Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University. 
  15. ^ "QS World University Rankings 2015". Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. 
  16. ^ "ARWU 2014 Top 500 Universities in Australia". Shanghai Ranking Consultancy. 
  17. ^ Boland, Michaela (1 March 2012). "National Gallery of Victoria appointment". The Australian. Retrieved 2012-03-02. 
  18. ^ "Graduation". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  19. ^ Evans, Gavin (26 January 2003). "A life on the run". The Guardian (London). 
  20. ^ Greig, Fiona. "Star cricketer and Deakin student Michael Klinger shares his amazing story". Deakin University. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  21. ^ http://www.gg.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/honours/ad/ad2015/Media%20Notes%20-%20AM%20%28A-L%29.pdf
  22. ^ "Jeff Rowley - Big Wave Surfer". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  23. ^ Studio None. "Brisbane Writers Festival". Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  24. ^ Australian of the Year (1992)

External links[edit]