Dean Gitter

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Dean Gitter
Born(1935-09-21)September 21, 1935[citation needed]
DiedNovember 21, 2018(2018-11-21) (aged 83)
EducationPhillips Academy
Alma materHarvard College (B.A)
London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art
Harvard Business School (MBA)

Dean L. Gitter (September 21, 1935 — November 21, 2018) was an entrepreneur, musician, and real estate developer in the Catskills in New York State.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Gitter was a graduate of Phillips Academy, Harvard College, the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, and the Harvard Business School.[3]

In the 1950s, Gitter produced recordings for Riverside Records, notably Odetta's debut album, Odetta Sings Ballads and Blues. Under the pseudonym of Dean Laurence, he produced Sam Gary's only album for the Esquire (UK) and Transition (US) labels.[4] In 1957, Gitter recorded a folk album titled Ghost Ballads, released by Riverside Records.[5]

In 1969, Gitter's University Cinema Association opened the Orson Welles Cinema in Cambridge, Massachusetts.[6][7] Other business ventures included starting a Kingston-based regional TV station (WTZA), co-founding the Big Indian Spring Water Company, and running Catskill Corners, including the Emerson in Mount Tremper, New York. The Emerson is a member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World, and Country Store at the Emerson features the world's largest kaleidoscope.[2][8][9]

Gitter was the Managing Partner of Crossroads Ventures, LLC, a venture capital company located in Shandaken, New York.[10][11] He later taught meditation in Big Indian, New York, where his spiritual teacher was Albert Rudolph.[citation needed] In 2013, he released the album "Carl Sandburg's American Songbag 2.0".[citation needed] In 2016, Gitter retired from the company and relocated to Taos County in Northern New Mexico,[12] where he owned a farm, raised horses, and recorded music.[13][14]

On November 21, 2018, Gitter died at the age of 83.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chronogram: "Dean Gitter, The Catskills' Last Resort?" by Josh Ripps, May 2002
  2. ^ a b Chronogram: "Local Luminary: Dean Gitter", by Brian K. Mahoney, October 2007
  3. ^ Profile of Dean Gitter
  4. ^ Sam Gary Discography
  5. ^ Riverside Records Catalog
  6. ^ Boston Phoenix: Harvard Square, by Lloyd Schwartz, November 15, 2006
  7. ^ Harvard Crimson, Parade, City Council Proclamation Greet New Orson Welles Cinema, by Frank Rich, April 8, 1969
  8. ^ The Catskills Alive!, by Francine Silverman
  9. ^ New York Times, A Field of Visions Is His Dream, Andrew C. Revkin, July 20, 1996.
  10. ^ Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., 2009
  11. ^ Catskill Heritage Regional Directory
  12. ^ "An invitation to American song". The Taos News. Retrieved 2018-11-23.
  13. ^ "At 81, Dean Gitter steps down as managing member of Crossroads Ventures". Daily Freeman. Retrieved 2018-11-23.
  14. ^ "64 More Acts That Took 20 Or More Years Between Albums". Stereogum. 2018-05-30. Retrieved 2018-11-23.
  15. ^ staff, Freeman. "Catskills developer Dean Gitter dies at 83". Daily Freeman. Retrieved 2018-11-23.