Dean Spanos

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Dean Spanos
Dean Spanos.jpg
Spanos in 2012
Born (1950-05-26) May 26, 1950 (age 66)
Stockton, California, U.S.
Alma mater University of the Pacific (CA), BA, 1972
Occupation Chairman of the Board of the NFL's Los Angeles Chargers franchise, 1984–present

Dean Alexander Spanos (born May 26, 1950) is the team president and CEO of the National Football League's Los Angeles Chargers franchise, in which his father, owner Alex Spanos, purchased majority interest in 1984.[1][2]

Early life, education and career[edit]

Raised in Stockton, California, the son of Alex Spanos, Spanos earned varsity letters in football and golf at Lincoln High School (Stockton, California). Dean received the Lincoln High Hall of Fame Award, which honors alumni whose contributions and accomplishments are representative of the school. He continued his golfing career at the University of the Pacific, graduating in 1972. He was named President/CEO of the Chargers early in 1994. That same year San Diego’s team rose to the ranks of one of the NFL's premier teams with its most memorable season in team history when it made it to Super Bowl XXIX. Under Spanos's watch as team president, the Chargers won 79 games from 2004–10, including three playoff wins and five AFC West titles (2004, 2006–09).

Spanos for years had been pushing for a new stadium for the Chargers. However Spanos rejected a new stadium proposal next to their former home at Qualcomm Stadium. This after the city entered into a 10 year agreement after the 1994 season where if the Chargers did not sell out the stadium, the city would purchase all the remaining seats. Various attempts were made to propose a new stadium, however Spanos insisted in being in Downtown San Diego.

After a 2016 bond measure for a Downtown stadium failed, Spanos and the Chargers followed through on their threat and in January 2017 announced the team was moving to Los Angeles. The residents of San Diego voted against the measure as it would take tax revenue away from the city and pay for a stadium for the Chargers(2016, 5-11 record). The Chargers would only commit to $100M for the building of the stadium, but would pay $500M to move to LA. The move resulted in widespread criticism by the abandoned San Diego fan base, as exemplified by Dean Spanos being called a "villain" for his decision and perceived lack of effort and/or ability to find a stadium solution in San Diego.[3] [4] [5] [6]

Honors, awards[edit]

Spanos has received a number of awards, including the Harold Leventhal Community Service Award, the top award of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, which was presented to Spanos and wife Susie in 2011 by the national board for their generosity. He was inducted into the DeMolay International Alumni Hall of Fame in 2002. DeMolay International is an organization dedicated to preparing young men to lead successful and productive lives.[7] In 2001, the San Diego Hall of Champions Sports Museum presented Dean and his wife with the Community Champions Award.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dean and Susie Spanos article Giving Back. gbsan.com. Retrieved on July 11, 2016.
  2. ^ Dean A. Spanos. PopWarner.com
  3. ^ http://fox5sandiego.com/2017/01/17/ryan-seacrest-asks-chargers-owner-dean-spanos-about-being-a-villian/
  4. ^ sdut-dean-spanos-chargers-owner-2015nov30-htmlstory.html
  5. ^ san-diegos-mayor-becomes-the-new-villian-in-the-stadium-saga
  6. ^ http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-chargers-move-live-dean-spanos-could-have-been-hero-now-1484242256-htmlstory.html
  7. ^ Dean A. Spanos profile, demolay.org; accessed September 24, 2016.

External links[edit]

  • Biodata, chargers.com; accessed September 24, 2016.