Dear Hearts and Gentle People

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"Dear Hearts and Gentle People"
Song
Published 1949
Composer(s) Sammy Fain
Lyricist(s) Bob Hilliard

"Dear Hearts and Gentle People" is a popular song published in 1949 with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Bob Hilliard. They were inspired to write the song based on a scrap of paper with the words "Dear friends and gentle hearts" written on it that was found on the body of Stephen Foster when he was discovered in a New York hotel room in January 1864.

Popular versions were recorded in 1949 by Dinah Shore, Gordon MacRae, Bing Crosby and Dennis Day. In the United Kingdom, the song was recorded by Doreen Lundy. Later recordings were made by Perry Como in 1959 and again in 1980. The song references the singer's hometown, and different versions allude to a range of U.S. states.

Versions[edit]

The Dinah Shore recording was recorded on September 9, 1949, and released by Columbia Records (as catalog number 38605). This version alludes to Tennessee, Shore's home state. The recording first appeared on the Billboard charts on November 19, 1949, lasting 17 weeks and peaking at position number two.[1]

The Gordon MacRae recording was recorded on October 21, 1949, and released by Capitol Records (as catalog number 777). It peaked at number 19 on the Billboard charts.[2] The flip side was "Mule Train," which MacRae recorded October 1, 1949.

The Bing Crosby recording was recorded on October 26, 1949,[3] and released by Decca Records (as catalog number 24798). This version mentions Idaho, close to Crosby's home state of Washington. The flip side was "Mule Train". The recording first appeared on the Billboard charts on December 3, 1949, lasting 17 weeks and peaking at number two.[4]

The Dennis Day recording was released by RCA Victor Records as a 78rpm single (catalog number 20-3596), and as a 45rpm single (catalog number 47-3102). The recording first appeared on the Billboard charts on January 14, 1950, lasting four weeks and peaking at number 14.[5]

The Doreen Lundy recording was recorded on February 22, 1950, and released by EMI's UK Columbia Records label (as catalog number DB 2649).

The song was performed by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys in the 1950 Columbia Pictures film Beyond the Purple Hills.

The Perry Como recording of April 23, 1959, was released as a track on the album Como Swings (catalog number LSP-2010). The Como recording of July 1980, from a live performance, was released on the album Perry Como Live on Tour in 1981 (catalog number AQL1-3826).

The song was also performed by famous loved entertainers Sharon, Lois & Bram for their hit T.V series The Elephant Show in 1989 which was also performed in concerts.

A version recorded by Bob Crosby and the Bobcats was featured in three hit video games of the Fallout Franchise, Fallout 3,[6] Fallout: New Vegas, and Fallout 4, published by Bethesda Softworks.

The British vocal group The Springfields included their version on their 1961 album Kinda Folksy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 389. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 291. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  3. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved September 20, 2016. 
  4. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 111. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  5. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 121. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  6. ^ Chris Gamble (2008-08-09), Bob Crosby - Dear hearts and gentle people - Fallout 3, retrieved 2016-05-25 

External links[edit]