Deborah Biancotti

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Deborah Biancotti
Born 1971 (age 45–46)
Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Nationality Australian
Period 2000–present
Genre Speculative fiction
Website
deborahbiancotti.net

Deborah Biancotti is an Australian writer of speculative fiction.

Biography[edit]

Biancotti was born in 1971 in Cairns, Queensland, Australia.[1] Her first work was published in 2000 with her short story "The First and Final Game" which was featured in Altair and won the 2000 Aurealis Award for best horror short story.[2][3] In 2001 she won the Ditmar Award for best new talent.[4] Biancotti's fifth short story, "King of All and the Metal Sentinel" was published in 2002 and won the 2003 Ditmar Award for best Australian short fiction.[5] In 2007 her story "A Scar for Leida" won the Aurealis Award for best young-adult short story.[6] Biancotti is now based in Sydney.[1]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Work Category Result
2000 Aurealis Award "The First and Final Game" Best horror short story Won[3]
2001 Ditmar Award Best new talent Won[4]
Ditmar Award "The First and Final Game" Best short story Nomination[4]
2002 Ditmar Award Best fan writer Nomination[7]
2003 Ditmar Award "King of All and the Metal Sentinel" Best Australian short fiction Won[5]
2004 Ditmar Award "The Singular Life of Eddy Dovewater" Best short story Nomination[8]
2005 Ditmar Award "Number 3 Raw Place" Best short story Nomination[9]
2006 Aurealis Award "The Dying Light" Best young-adult short story Nomination[10]
Australian Shadows Award "The Dying Light" Nomination[11]
Ditmar Award "Summa Seltzer Missive" Best short story Nomination[12]
2007 Aurealis Award "A Scar for Leida" Best young-adult short story Won[6]
Ditmar Award "Surrender 1: Rope Artist" Best short story Nomination[13]
2008 Aurealis Award "Pale Dark Soldier" Best horror short story Nomination[14]
Aurealis Award "The Tailor of Time" Best young-adult short story Nomination[14]
Ditmar Award
(with Jonathan Strahan, Garth Nix, Trevor Stafford)
Professional achievement Nomination[15]
Ditmar Award "A Scar for Leida" Best short story Nomination[15]
2009 Aurealis Award A Book of Endings Best collection Nomination[16]
Australian Shadows Awards A Book of Endings Best long fiction Nomination[17]
Australian Shadows Awards "Six Suicides" Best short fiction Won[18]
Ditmar Award "Pale Dark Soldier" Best short story Nomination[19]
2010 Crawford Award A Book of Endings Nomination[20]
Ditmar Award A Book of Endings Best collected work Nomination[21]
Ditmar Award "Six Suicides" Best short story Nomination[21]
Locus Award A Book of Endings Best collection Nomination[22]

Bibliography[edit]

Short fiction[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • A Book of Endings (2009)
  • Bad Power (2011)

Novella[edit]

  • Waking in Winter (2016)

Novels[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b "Bio". Deborahbiancotti.net. Archived from the original on 24 December 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  2. ^ "Publications". Deborahbiancotti.net. Archived from the original on 24 December 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2001 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 March 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2001 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2003 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  6. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2008 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  7. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2002 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  8. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2004 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  9. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2005 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  10. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2007 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  11. ^ "2006 Shortlist". Australian Shadows Award. Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  12. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2006 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 16 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  13. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2007 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  14. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2009 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  15. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2008 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  16. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2010 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 3 February 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  17. ^ "2009 Australian Shadows Award: Finalists". Australian Shadows Award. Archived from the original on 8 January 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  18. ^ "2009 Australian Shadows Award: Winners". Australian Shadows Award. Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  19. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2009 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 15 August 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  20. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2010 William L. Crawford – IAFA Fantasy Award". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 3 February 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  21. ^ a b "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2010 Ditmar Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 3 February 2011. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  22. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2010 Locus Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 19 December 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 

External links[edit]