Debouillet (sheep)

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The Debouillet is a breed of domestic sheep originating from Tatum, New Mexico. It was developed in the 1920s through crossing Rambouillet and Delaine Merino sheep, and the breed's name is a portmanteau of these two ancestors.[1] This breed is primarily raise for its wool.[2]

Characteristics[edit]

Specifically adapted to the arid ranges of the Southwestern U.S., the breed is medium–size sheep with long, fine wool. Ewes are polled and rams may or may not have horns.[1]

Mature ewes will weigh from 125 lb (57 kg) to 160 lb (73 kg) and ram will weigh from 175 lb (79 kg) to 250 lb (113 kg).

The fleece from mature ewes will weight from 10 lb (4.5 kg) to 18 lb (8.1 kg) with a 35% to 50% yield. The stable length of the fleece is from 3 inches (7.5 cm) to 5 inches (12.5 cm) with a numerical count of 62 to 80 which is 18.5 to 23.5 micrometres diameter.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Simmons, Paula; Carol Ekarius (2001). Storey's Guide to Raising Sheep. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing LLC. ISBN 978-1-58017-262-2. 
  2. ^ "Debouillet/United States of America". Breed Data Sheet. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System. Retrieved 2009-08-28. 
  3. ^ "Debouillet". Breeds of Livestock. Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Animal Science. Archived from the original on 2009-12-24. Retrieved 2009-04-09. 

External links[edit]