Debout la France

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Debout la France
Leader Nicolas Dupont-Aignan
Vice President Patrick Mignon
Secretary-General Frédéric Mortier
Founded 23 November 2008
Split from Union for a Popular Movement
Headquarters 55, rue de Concy 91330 Yerres
93, rue de l'Université 75007 Paris
Membership (2018) Increase 22,000 (claimed)[1]
Ideology French nationalism[2]
National conservatism[3]
Republicanism[4]
Gaullism[3][5]
Euroscepticism[6][7]
Souverainism[8]
Political position Right-wing[6][9][10][11] to far-right[12][13]
European affiliation Alliance for Direct Democracy in Europe, EUDemocrats
International affiliation None
Colours

               Blue, White, Red (French Tricolore)

     Purple (customary)
Slogan "Neither system nor extreme"
National Assembly
1 / 577
Senate
0 / 348
European Parliament
1 / 74
Presidency of Regional Councils
0 / 17
Presidency of Departmental Councils
0 / 101
Website
http://www.debout-la-france.fr/

Constitution of France
Parliament; government; president

Debout la France ([dœˈbu la fʁɑ̃s], "France Arise"; DLF) is a French political party founded by Nicolas Dupont-Aignan in 1999 under the name Debout la République (Republic Arise, DLR) as the "genuine Gaullist" branch of the Rally for the Republic (RPR). It was relaunched again in 2000 and 2002 and held its inaugural congress as an autonomous party in 2008. At the 2014 congress its name was changed to Debout la France.

It is led by Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, who holds the party's one and only seat in the French National Assembly. Dupont-Aignan contested the 2012 Presidential election and received 644,043 votes in the first ballot, or 1.79% of the votes cast, finishing seventh. In 2007 he had failed to win the required 500 endorsements from elected officials to run in the 2007 presidential election. He dropped out without endorsing any candidate, not even UMP candidate and former President Nicolas Sarkozy. However, he was re-elected by the first round of the 2007 legislative election as a DLF candidate in his home department of Essonne.

The party is a member of EUDemocrats, a Eurosceptic[14] transnational European political party.

Popular support and electoral record[edit]

DLF has little electoral support, and its support is concentrated in Dupont-Aignan's department of Essonne, where the DLF list polled 5.02% in the 2009 European Parliament election[15] and it polled up to 36.14% in his hometown of Yerres[16] The party also polled well in the Île-de-France region (2.44%), the North-West (2.4%) and the East constituency (2.33%). All of these regions include conservative and Gaullist departments.

In the 2012 presidential election the party's candidate Nicolas Dupont-Aignan obtained 1,79% of votes at the first round, and did not endorse any candidate in the second. In the following legislative elections Dupont-Aignan was elected to the National Assembly in Essonne's 8th constituency.

The European election of 2014 saw an increase of the party, who obtained 3,82% of votes, without managing to elect any MEP.

In the 2017 presidential election the party's candidate Nicolas Dupont-Aignan obtained 4,73% of votes at the first round. He later announced his endorsement for National Front's candidate Marine Le Pen in the second round. In the following legislative elections Dupont-Aignan was re-elected to the National Assembly.

Elections[edit]

Presidential elections[edit]

President of the French Republic
Election year Candidate # of 1st round votes % of 1st round vote # of 2nd round votes % of 2nd round vote Outcome
2012 Nicolas Dupont-Aignan 643,907 1.79% Lost
2017 Nicolas Dupont-Aignan 1,695,000 4.73% Lost

European Parliament[edit]

European Parliament
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2009 304,585 1.77% 0
2014 744,441 3.82% 0

Regional Parliament[edit]

Grand Est
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 84,886 4.78% 0
Nouvelle Aquitaine
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 69,285 3.35% 0
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 71,538 2.85% 0
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 49,774 5.17% 0
Bretagne
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 34,916 2.90% 0
Centre-Val de Loire
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 39,406 4.58% 0
Île-de-France
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2010 119,835 4.15% 0
2015 207,286 6.57% 0
Occitanie
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 80,375 3.91% 0
La Réunion
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 978 0.37% 0
Lorraine
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2010 14,880 2.25% 0
Hauts-de-France
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 53,359 2.39% 0
Normandy
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 47,391 4.14% 0
Pays de la Loire
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 51,873 4.09% 0
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2015 34,599 1.95% 0
Upper Normandy
Election year Number of votes % of overall vote # of seats won
2010 10,237 1.79% 0

Elected officials[edit]

Nicolas Dupont-Aignan (Essonne) is the only DLF member of the National Assembly. The party also claims 3 general councillors, and Mayors in four communes: Yerres, Cambrai, Saint-Prix and Ancinnes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Le splendide isolement de Nicolas Dupont-Aignan". Le Point (in French). 25 January 2018. Retrieved 27 January 2018. 
  2. ^ "France election: Marine Le Pen would make Dupont-Aignan PM". BBC News. 29 April 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Nordsieck, Wolfram (2017). "France". Parties and Elections in Europe. 
  4. ^ https://www.lopinion.fr/video/chiffre-jour/nicolas-sarkozy-proces-en-republicanisme-24708
  5. ^ https://www.lesechos.fr/21/04/2017/lesechos.fr/0211947435399_qui-est-nicolas-dupont-aignan--le-candidat-du--gaullisme-.htm
  6. ^ a b Euroscepticism (PDF). Cardiff EDC. April 2015. p. 18. 
  7. ^ http://www.lejdd.fr/Politique/Le-Pen-Melenchon-Dupont-Aignan-A-chaque-eurosceptique-son-Frexit-792219
  8. ^ http://lelab.europe1.fr/quand-le-vice-president-du-parti-souverainiste-debout-la-france-semble-regretter-le-temps-des-colonies-2617203
  9. ^ What Le Pen really wants. POLITICO. Author - Nicholas Vinocur. Published 21 December 2015. Last updated 22 December 2015. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  10. ^ Le Pen names former rival as prime minister. The Times. Authors - Duncan Geddes and Adam Sage. Published 29 April 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  11. ^ Marine Le Pen Will Name a Former Rival Prime Minister if Elected. The New York Times. Author - Aurelien Breeden. Published 29 April 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  12. ^ "Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, de la droite décomplexée à l'extrême-droite". Europe 1 (in French). 20 March 2017. 
  13. ^ Eva Mignot (28 June 2017). "Au moins 82 députés ont un membre de leur famille engagé dans la vie politique". Le Monde.fr (in French). Retrieved 18 July 2017. 
  14. ^ Article by Géraud de Ville in Politeia (10/2007): Eurosceptics are Eurocritics or Eurorealists;
  15. ^ "Interactive map of the 2009 European election results". Libération.fr. Archived from the original on 2011-10-07. 
  16. ^ "Ministry of the Interior results page". 

External links[edit]