Debreceni VSC (women's handball)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
DVSC-SCHAEFFLER
DebreceniVSC.gif
Full name Debreceni Vasutas Sport Club
Short name DVSC
Founded 1948; 70 years ago (1948)
Arena Hódos Imre Sportcsarnok, Debrecen
Capacity 1,800
President Hungary Vilmos Köstner
Head coach Norway Pål Oldrup Jensen
League Nemzeti Bajnokság I
2017–18 9th
Colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Home
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Away
Website
Official site

Debreceni Vasutas Sport Club, commonly abbreviated DVSC, is a Hungarian women's handball club from Debrecen, that plays in the Nemzeti Bajnokság I.

Since August 2018 they are sponsored by Schaeffler Group, so the official name for the team is DVSC SCHAEFFLER.[1]

History[edit]

Nicknamed Loki, the team was founded in 1948 as a department of the multi-sports club Debreceni VSC. Seven years later they have won their first ever Hungarian championship title after beating two of their three opponents in the championship final, including title holders Csepeli SK. However, this achievement remained the lone success of the club for a long time, after they got relegated in 1959 and spent the subsequent twenty years in the second division.[2]

Promoted back in 1979, their brightest period came under the management of Ákos Komáromi, between the late eighties and mid-nineties, during which time they won the Hungarian championship, five Hungarian cups and two consecutive EHF Cups. The latter one is an exceptional success, no other teams have ever defended their title in the EHF Cup.[3]

In the following years the club lost many of their key players and their financial options narrowed as well, which resulted a significant setback. The team were on the brink of bankruptcy, when András Gellén, a businessman and die-hard DVSC fan took over the club in May 2009.[4]

Gellén had his own conception, that built solely on Hungarian players and promoted the youngsters. To fulfil the club's long term plans, he also invested into a new arena for the handball academy, which was finished in January 2011 and cost around €1.4 million.[5]

In the second part of 2011, however, DVSC faced a heavy financial crisis as Gellén could not pay the wages, and as a result, many of the first team players left. Gellén eventually sold his 63.3% share to the city of Debrecen for a nominal fee of 10 Hungarian Forint, that now owns 96.4% of the club. The city worked out a long term project, which similarly to the club's former intention wants to build on home-grown players. The budget in the first season is expected to be around 100 million Forint (approximately €330,000), which may grow to 150–180 million (€500,000–600,000) in the coming years to ensure Debrecen to achieve a podium finish and to qualify to a European cup again. Balázs Makray took the chairman duties, who faced the similar situation in 1999 when he took over the local football club, and for the 2000s he made Debreceni VSC one of the dominant team in the Hungarian league.[6][7]

Crest, colours, supporters[edit]

Kit manufacturers and Shirt sponsor[edit]

The following table shows in detail Debreceni VSC kit manufacturers and shirt sponsors by year:

Period Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Kempa
2004–2005 debmut / G HBZ
2005–2006 Hotel Balmaz / debmut / G HBZ
2006–2007 Hotel Balmaz / debmut
2007–2008 Puma Hotel Balmaz
2008–2009 Erreà
2009–2010 Korvex / Hajdú Takarék
2010–2011 Korvex
2011–2012 Korvex / Hajdú Takarék
2012–2013 OTP Bank
2013–2014 TvP / OTP Bank
2014–2015 Erima TvP / Aquaticum
2015 TvP / Cívis Ház
2016– TvP / Cívis Ház / Szerencsejáték Zrt.

Team[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Squad for the 2018–19 season[8]

Transfers[edit]

Transfers for the 2018-19 season

Honours[edit]

Domestic competitions[edit]

Nemzeti Bajnokság I (National Championship of Hungary)

  • Gold medal blank.svg Champions (2): 1955, 1987
  • Silver medal blank.svg Runners-up (8): 1985, 1988–89, 1989–90, 1993–94, 1994–95, 1995–96, 2009–10, 2010–11
  • Bronze medal blank.svg Third place (4): 1986, 1990–91, 1992–93, 2008–09

Magyar Kupa (National Cup of Hungary)

  • Gold medal with cup.svg Winners (4): 1985, 1987, 1989–90, 1990–91
  • Silver medal with cup.svg Finalists (6): 1983, 1988, 1995–96, 2000–01, 2008–09, 2010–11

European competitions[edit]

EHF Cup Winners' Cup

EHF Cup

Recent seasons[edit]

As of 1 November 2017.
Season Division Pos. Magyar kupa
1993-94 NB I Runner-up
1994-95 NB I Runner-up
1995-96 NB I Runner-up Silver medal with cup.svg Finalist
1996-97 NB I 4th
1997-98 NB I 5th
1998-99 NB I 4th
1999-00 NB I 4th
2000-01 NB I 5th Silver medal with cup.svg Finalist
2001-02 NB I 5th
2002-03 NB I 8th
Season Division Pos. Magyar kupa
2003-04 NB I 6th
2004-05 NB I 5th
2005-06 NB I 4th
2006-07 NB I 5th
2007-08 NB I 5th
2008-09 NB I Third place Silver medal with cup.svg Finalist
2009-10 NB I Runner-up
2010-11 NB I Runner-up Silver medal with cup.svg Finalist
2011-12 NB I 8th Quarter-finals
2012-13 NB I 11th Quarter-finals
Season Division Pos. Magyar kupa
2013-14 NB I 9th Quarter-finals
2014-15 NB I 7th Quarter-finals
2015-16 NB I 4th Round 4
2016-17 NB I 7th Bronze medal with cup.svg Third place
2017-18 NB I 9th Round 4

In European competition[edit]

Source: kézitörténelem.hu

Season Competition Round Club Home Away Aggregate
1985-86 IHF Cup*
Silver medal blank.svg Finalist
1/8-finals Belgium DHC Neerpelt 44-11 34-8 78–19
1/4-finals Norway Gjerpen IF Skien 29-24 25-26 54–50
1/2-finals Sweden Tyresö HF 27-19 25-20 52–39
Finals East Germany SC Leipzig 22-16 15-25 37–41
1986-87 Cup Winners' Cup 1/8-finals Soviet Union Selchoztecnica Krasnodar 23-23 24-29 47–52
1987-88 IHF Cup* 1/8-finals Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belinka Ljubljana 28-25 22-26 50–51
1988-89 Champions Cup* Round 1 Hungary Bp. Spartacus SC bye –
1/8-finals Bulgaria VIF Dimitrov Sofia 35-19 28-24 63–43
1/4-finals West Germany TV Lützellinden 20-22 22-18 42–40
1/2-finals Austria Hypobank Südstadt 24-29 15-20 39–49
1989-90 Cup Winners' Cup
Silver medal blank.svg
Finalist
Round 1 Hungary Vasas SC bye –
1/8-finals Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Belgrade 33-17 21-29 54–46
1/4-finals Czechoslovakia Iskra Partizánske 31-19 21-21 52–40
1/2-finals Romania Terom Iaşi 30-19 23-28 53–47
Finals Soviet Union Rostselmash Rostov 21-17 18-28 39–45
1990-91 Cup Winners' Cup 1/8-finals Austria Union Hollabrunn 32-14 30-23 62–37
1/4-finals Norway Lunner IL Gran 33-28 23-24 56–52
1/2-finals Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Belgrade 23-21 21-30 44–51
1991-92 Cup Winners' Cup
Silver medal blank.svg
Finalist
1/8-finals Turkey Halkbank Ankara 38-15 33-21 71–36
1/4-finals Croatia Podravka Koprivnica 32-17 21-24 53–41
1/2-finals Norway Byåsen IL Trondheim 19-19 23-23 42–42 (a)
Finals Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radnički Belgrade (a) 26-21 19-24 45–45
1992-93 IHF Cup* Round 1 Turkey Anadolu Un. SC Eskişehir 40-15 35-18 75–33
1/8-finals France CSL Dijon 29-21 18-29 47–50
1993-94 EHF Cup
Silver medal blank.svg Finalist
1/16-finals Lithuania Vytis Kaunas 32-15 34-14 66–29
1/8-finals Russia Rossijanka Volgograd 27-24 20-22 47–46
1/4-finals Ukraine Spartak Kyiv 33-19 25-23 58–42
1/2-finals Spain Valencia Urbana 34-14 22-24 46–38
Finals Denmark Viborg HK (a) 24-21 20-23 44–44
1994-95 EHF Cup
Gold medal blank.svg Winner
1/16-finals Luxembourg HB Echternach 48-2 42-4 90–6
1/8-finals Turkey TMO SC Ankara 22-15 22-18 44–33
1/4-finals Romania Silcotub Zalău 24-14 14-19 38–33
1/2-finals Germany Buxtehuder SV 21-21 23-23 44–44 (a)
Finals Norway Bækkelagets Oslo 22-14 22-30 44–44 (a)
1995-96 EHF Cup
Gold medal blank.svg Winner
1/8-finals Switzerland TV Uster 28-15 26-20 54–35
1/4-finals Denmark GOG Gudme 24-15 16-25 40–40 (a)
1/2-finals Russia Istochnik Rostov 25-20 23-22 48–42
Finals Norway Larvik HK 18-15 20-23 38–38 (a)
1996-97 EHF Cup 1/8-finals Slovakia Plastika Nitra 17-12 14-19 31–31 (a)
1/4-finals Romania Oțelul Galați 17-14 17-21 34–35
1997-98 City Cup 1/8-finals Ukraine Spartak Kyiv 25-27 24-32 49–59
1998-99 EHF Cup 1/16-finals Croatia ŽRK Osijek 18-11 25-23 43–34
1/8-finals Denmark Viborg HK 25-20 12-30 37–50
1999-00 EHF Cup 1/8-finals Bosnia and Herzegovina Interinvest Mostar 31-17 27-21 58–38
1/4-finals Spain El Ferrobús Mislata 19-33 20-23 39–56
2000-01 EHF Cup Round 3 Austria McDonald´s Wr.Neustadt 25-25 25-20 50–45
Round 4 Poland Zagłębie Lubin 28-25 13-17 41–42
2001-02 Cup Winners' Cup Round 3 Azerbaijan Qaradağ Sement-Baku 45-20 36-32 81–52
Round 4 Germany TSV Bayer 04 Leverkusen 25-23 25-32 50–55
2002-03 EHF Cup Round 2 Portugal Madeira Andebol SAD 29-22 28-34 57–56
Round 3 Greece GAS Anagennisi Artas 10-0 26-25 36–25
Round 4 Denmark Slagelse FH 23-38 29-42 52–80
2005-06 EHF Cup Round 2 Russia Astrakhanochka Astrakhan 21-18 23-25 44–43
Round 3 Norway Tertnes Bergen 31-19 20-28 51–47
1/8 Final Poland SPR Icom Lublin 24-16 23-27 47–43
1/4 Final France HB Metz Moselle Lorraine 20-16 23-25 43–41
1/2 Final Croatia Podravka Vegeta, Koprivnica 24-29 21-26 45–55
2006-07 EHF Cup Round 3 Romania C.S. HC Zalău 41-21 31-21 72–42
1/8 Final France HB Metz Moselle Lorraine 20-17 23-25 43–42
1/4 Final Denmark Ikast Bording EH A/S 27-26 24-26 51–52
2007-08 Cup Winners' Cup Round 3 Montenegro ŽRK Petrol Bonus Podgorica 44-12 30-12 74–24
1/8 Final Romania C.S. Rulmentul-Urban Braşov 30-30 20-25 50–55
2008-09 Cup Winners' Cup Round 3 Italy S.S. Pallamano Bancole 44-26 38-23 82–49
1/8 Final Romania Oțelul Galați (a) 34-29 24-29 58–58
2009-10 Cup Winners' Cup Round 3 Czech Republic DHK ZORA Olomouc 39-27 28-25 67–52
Round 4 Montenegro Budućnost T-Mobile 27-20 20-28 47–48
2010-11 Champions League Qual. Tournament 2
(Group 2)
Denmark KIF Vejen 31-20 1st Arrow-up.png
Poland SPR Lublin SSA 29-26
Serbia RK Zaječar 25-24
Group Matches
(Group B)
Austria Hypo Niederösterreich 22–21 26–28 4th
Germany HC Leipzig 19–20 25–31
Spain Itxako Reyno de Navarra 27–32 24–39
2011-12 Champions League Qual. Tournament / SF Portugal CDE Gil Eanes 35-22
Qual. Tournament / F Germany Buxtehuder SV 26-30 Arrow-down.gif CWC
2011-12 Cup Winners' Cup Round 3 Greece Ormi-Loux Patras 41-26 31-27 72–53
Last 16 Spain BM. Mar Sagunto 28-28 31-25 59–53
Quarter Final Denmark Viborg HK 25-39 25-42 50–81
2016-17 EHF Cup Qual. Round 2 France Nantes Loire Atlantique HB 26-28 23-24 49–52
2017-18 EHF Cup Qual. Round 2 Poland Metraco Zagłębie Lubin 26-20 23-25 49–45
Qual. Round 3 Romania SCM Craiova 26-24 19-24 45–48

Records[edit]

Notable players[edit]

Notable coaches[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "DVSC SCHAEFFLER NÉVEN FOLYTATJUK!" (in Hungarian). dvsckezilabda.hu. 10 August 2018. 
  2. ^ "Törekvés, Lokomotív, DVSC, avagy a kezdetektől az első aranyérmen át a másodosztályig" (in Hungarian). DVSC Official Website. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  3. ^ "Sporttörténelem: címvédés az EHF-kupában" (in Hungarian). DVSC Official Website. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  4. ^ "Új úton a régi sikerekért" (in Hungarian). DVSC Official Website. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  5. ^ "Gellén András új kézilabdacsarnokot építtetett" (in Hungarian). DVSC Official Website. 12 January 2011. Archived from the original on 16 January 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  6. ^ "Makray Balázs lesz az új ügyvezető" (in Hungarian). DVSC official website. 11 January 2012. Archived from the original on 14 January 2012. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "DVSC: szinte 100% az önkormányzaté". Hungarian Press Agency (in Hungarian). Handball.hu. 12 January 2012. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "Játékosok". dvsckezilabda.hu. 
  9. ^ "Magyar bajnokság NB1 - női" (in Hungarian). kezitortenelem.hu. 
  10. ^ "Magyar bajnokság NB1B - női" (in Hungarian). kezitortenelem.hu. 
  11. ^ "Magyar bajnokság NB2 - női (1957-1980)" (in Hungarian). kezitortenelem.hu. 
  12. ^ a b "Örökranglista" (in Hungarian). DVSC Official Website. Archived from the original on 25 February 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 

External links[edit]