December 1934

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The following events occurred in December 1934:

December 1, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

December 2, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

December 3, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

December 4, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

December 5, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

December 6, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

December 7, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

December 8, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

December 9, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

December 10, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

December 11, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Kerns Hotel fire: a fire broke out in a 211-room hotel in Lansing, Michigan, killing 32 people.[18]
  • American woman Isobel Lillian Steele was released from prison in Nazi Germany after being held for four months on suspicion of espionage. Her case had garnered significant media attention in the United States, and when she returned there she did much to capitalize on her story by writing articles and a book, eventually even playing herself in the 1936 film I Was a Captive in Nazi Germany.[19][20][21]
  • Died: Paul Rougnon, 88, French composer, pianist and music educator

December 12, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • 150 were injured in Liverpool, England when the floor of a school concert hall collapsed.[22]

December 13, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The German cabinet issued twelve new decrees during its final session of the year. Several economic measures were passed as well as one providing a prison term of up to two years for those who "harm the state, its leaders, or the standing of the National Socialist party and its affiliations."[23]

December 14, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

  • The British cargo ship Usworth sank in the Atlantic Ocean. Rescue operations were carried out but only nine of the 26 crew of survived.[24][25]
  • 15 were killed and 7 hurt in Berlin when an express train carrying Adolf Hitler and other Nazi leaders struck a bus on a level grade crossing. All the dead and wounded were aboard the bus.[26][27]
  • Born: Marilyn Cooper, actress, in New York City (d. 2009); Charlie Hodge, musician, in Decatur, Alabama (d. 2006)

December 15, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

December 16, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

December 17, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

December 18, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

December 19, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

December 20, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

December 21, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

December 22, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

December 23, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

December 24, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • Pope Pius XI delivered a Christmas address to the world, saying it was as necessary as ever for mankind to choose Luke 2:14 ("on earth peace, good will toward men") as its "unceasing prayer." For those who wanted war, the pope said he had formulated another prayer: "destroy, O Lord, the people who wish for war."[37]
  • Rudolf Hess gave a Christmas message to Nazi Germany over government-controlled radio, saying "The world today realizes it is only thanks to Hitler that the peace of Europe was saved in the past year when it was repeatedly endangered. Hitler's carefulness and the statements he issued lessened international tension and showed him as a statesman of world importance. He is the chancellor of peace."[38]
  • Mussolini ordered General Emilio De Bono to Eritrea to take command of the Italian forces there.[39]
  • Nazi police arrested and imprisoned an American woman in Waldmohr for remarks she made during a conversation in a restaurant, allegedly saying that Hitler had Jewish blood.[40][41]
  • Born: Stjepan Mesić, Croatian politician, in Orahovica, Yugoslavia

December 25, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

December 26, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

December 27, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

December 28, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

December 29, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

December 30, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

  • About 40 to 50 members of the Mexican paramilitary organization the Red Shirts opened fire on churchgoers leaving Mass in Coyoacán, killing 5. One of the Red Shirts was beaten to death by an angry crowd to bring the death toll to 6.[48]
  • Mussolini wrote a memorandum for Marshal Pietro Badoglio titled "Directive and Plan of Action to Solve the Abyssinian question." "I decide on this war, the object of which is nothing more than the complete destruction of the Abyssinian army and the total conquest of Abyssinia", Mussolini wrote. "In no other way can we build the empire."[49]
  • Born: John N. Bahcall, astrophysicist, in Shreveport, Louisiana (d. 2005); Joseph P. Hoar, U.S. Marine Corps general, in Boston, Massachusetts; Del Shannon, rock and roll and country musician, in Grand Rapids, Michigan (d. 1990); Russ Tamblyn, actor and dancer, in Los Angeles

December 31, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle East. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 1858. ISBN 978-1-85109-672-5. 
  2. ^ "Navy Whips Army, 3-0, on Cutter's Kick". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 2, 1934. p. Part 2 p. 1. 
  3. ^ Scheier, Joan (2002). The Central Park Zoo. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 37–38. ISBN 978-0-7385-1100-9. 
  4. ^ "German-French Saar Pact Seen Move for Peace". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 4, 1934. p. 1. 
  5. ^ Rodogno, Davide (2006). Fascism's European Empire: Italian Occupation During the Second World War. Cambridge University Press. p. 61. ISBN 978-0-521-84515-1. 
  6. ^ Olson, James S. (1991). Historical Dictionary of European Imperialism. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 366. ISBN 978-0-313-26257-9. 
  7. ^ a b "Tageseinträge für 4. Dezember 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 6, 1934). "Music Revolt Flares in Berlin for Art Freedom". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  9. ^ Arreguín-Toft, Ivan (2005). How the Weak Win Wars: A Theory of Asymmetric Conflict. Cambridge University Press. p. 114. ISBN 978-0-521-83976-1. 
  10. ^ "Turkish women celebrate 76th anniversary of women's suffrage with higher hopes". Hürriyet Daily News. December 6, 2010. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Divorce Asked by Jean Harlow from Third Mate". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 6, 1934. p. 2. 
  12. ^ Robbins, Keith Spalding. "A Strategic Approach for Baseball to Flourish in Modern China." The Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture, 2013–2014. Ed. William M. Simons. State University of New York, 2015. 184. ISBN 978-1-4766-2014-5.
  13. ^ Baldassaro, Lawrence (2011). Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseball. University of Nebraska Press. p. 106. ISBN 978-0-8032-3467-3. 
  14. ^ "U.S. and Japan are Linked by Phone Service". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 8, 1934. p. 3. 
  15. ^ a b "Chronology 1934". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Foes in Balkans Agree on Peace; War Peril Ends". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 11, 1934. p. 1. 
  17. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 446. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  18. ^ "Box 23". Lansing Fire Department. Archived from the original on July 27, 2013. Retrieved July 27, 2013. 
  19. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 11, 1934). "Germany to Free U.S. Woman Held as a Spy Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11. 
  20. ^ "Germany: Steel Case". Time. November 19, 1934. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  21. ^ Nugent, Frank (August 3, 1936). "I Was a Captive in Nazi Germany (1936)". The New York Times. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  22. ^ "150 Injured as Floor Falls in British School". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 13, 1934. p. 1. 
  23. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 14, 1934). "German Cabinet Tightens Nazi Grip on State". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 18. 
  24. ^ "Waves Sink Lifeboat; 17 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 15, 1934. p. 1. 
  25. ^ "SS Usworth". Wreck Site. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  26. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 15, 1934). "Hitler's Train Strikes Bus; 14 Killed, 7 Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  27. ^ "Nazis Thank Providence for Hitler's Escape in Crash". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. December 16, 1934. 
  28. ^ "Plan Tax for Job Insurance". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 16, 1934. p. 1. 
  29. ^ "Italy Demands Apology in Row with Ethiopia". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 17, 1934. p. 7. 
  30. ^ "Flood of Tiber Drives 1,000 from Homes in Rome". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 18, 1934. p. 10. 
  31. ^ "Great Moments in Law and Politics: Egon Kisch". Bytes Daily. December 14, 2013. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  32. ^ "Soldiers Kill 2 in Lynch Mob". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 20, 1934. p. 1. 
  33. ^ Marsh, Timothy C.; Marsh, Helen C. (December 25, 2009). "Bedford County". Tennessee Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  34. ^ "Alfonso's Deaf Mute Son Will Wed Italian Girl". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 21, 1934. p. 3. 
  35. ^ "Troops Arrive; Saar Sulky". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 23, 1934. p. 1. 
  36. ^ "Russia Arrests Trotzky Chiefs for Death Plot". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 23, 1934. p. 1. 
  37. ^ "Pope's Christmas Message Plea for Peace in All Lands". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 25, 1934. p. 2. 
  38. ^ Schulz, Sigrid (December 25, 1934). "Nazis Proclaim Hitler Europe's Peace Champion". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 19. 
  39. ^ Nicolle, David (2005). The Italian Invasion of Abyssinia 1935–36. Osprey Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 978-1-85532-692-7. 
  40. ^ "New York Woman is Arrested in Germany". Lewiston Evening Journal. Lewiston, Maine. December 29, 1934. p. 1. 
  41. ^ "Germany Frees U. S. Girl; Held in Jail 11 Days". Chicago Daily Tribune: 7. January 4, 1935. 
  42. ^ "Trains Crash; 15 Die, 40 Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 26, 1934. p. 1. 
  43. ^ "Accent on Youth". Playbill Vault. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  44. ^ "Saar Frontier is Sealed Shut Till After Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 27, 1934. p. 9. 
  45. ^ "December 1934". Franklin D. Roosevelt Day by Day. FDR Presidential Library. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  46. ^ "Railway Enters China's Hinterland". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 29, 1934. p. 7. 
  47. ^ a b "1934". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  48. ^ "6 Mexicans Die in Riot After Church Service". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 31, 1934. p. 1. 
  49. ^ Pollard, John (1998). The Fascist Experience in Italy. London: Routledge. p. 96. ISBN 978-1-134-81904-1. 
  50. ^ "Mexico Holds 62 'Red Shirts' for Church Killings". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 1, 1935. p. 24.