Decentralized application

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A decentralized application (Dapp, dApp or DApp) is an application run by many users on a decentralized network with trustless protocols. They are designed to avoid any single point of failure.[citation needed] They typically have tokens to reward users for providing computing power.[1][unreliable source]

Definition[edit]

The definition of a decentralized application is still in development and under debate.[citation needed] The term originates from the Decentralized Application Corporation and decentralized autonomous organization.[2][3]:1-8

Typical definitions include the following attributes:[2][3][4][5][6][7]

  • The code is open-source and autonomously managed
  • Records and data are stored using blockchain, providing trustless interaction and avoiding any single point of failure
  • Use cryptographic tokens as a medium of exchange, to reward users validating transactions or providing services on the network, etc.
  • Tokens generated through a cryptographic algorithm

There are three types of decentralized applications:[2][4][6]

  • Type I decentralized applications that have their own block chain, such as Bitcoin.
  • Type II decentralized applications that use the blockchain of a type I but are protocols and have tokens that are necessary for their function like the Bitcoin Omni Layer.
  • Type III decentralized applications that use the protocol of a type II and are additionally protocols that have tokens necessary for their function, such as the SAFE Network that uses the Omni Protocol to issue safecoins.

Deployment[edit]

Decentralized applications may run on top of other cryptographic systems such as Ethereum.[1] in December 2017, the popular game CryptoKitties slowed the Ethereum network and exposed the vulnerability of public blockchains to traffic slowdowns.[8] Decentralized applications use Smart Contracts to connect to a blockchain, where the backend of the Dapp runs on a decentralized P2P network.[5]

Examples[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hertig, Alyssa. "What is a Decentralized Application?".
  2. ^ a b c Siraj, Raval (2016). Decentralized applications: Harnessing Bitcoin's Blockchain technology (First ed.). Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media. ISBN 9781491924525. OCLC 953971624.
  3. ^ a b Raval, Siraj. Decentralized Applications HARNESSING BITCOIN'S BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY. O'Reilly. ISBN 9781491924549.
  4. ^ a b Johnston, David; Yilmaz, Sam Onat; Kandah, Jeremy; Bentenitis, Nikos; Hashemi, Farzad; Gross, Ron; Wilkinson, Shawn; Mason, Steven (2 February 2015). "The General Theory of Decentralized Applications, Dapps". GitHub. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Decentralized Applications – dApps". Blockchain Hub. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  6. ^ a b Ruth, Angela. "Why Build Decentralized Applications: Understanding Dapp". Due. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  7. ^ Demchenko, Lidiia. "Why People Choose Dapps over Apps?". Dapp. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  8. ^ Kharif, Olga (2017-12-05). "CryptoKitties Mania Overwhelms Ethereum Network's Processing". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2018-08-23.