Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment

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The Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, or Stockholm Declaration, was adopted on June 16, 1972 by the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at the 21st plenary meeting as the first document in international environmental law to recognize the right to a healthy environment. In the declaration, the nations agreed to accept responsibility for any environmental effects caused by their actions.[1]

Contents of Declaration[edit]

The document opens with seven proclamations covering the global nature of environmental problems and stating that they will require extensive cooperation among nations to resolve.[2] These proclamations conclude that efforts for environmental preservation and improvement will benefit all people and their posterity.[2][3] The declaration then states twenty-six principles to guide the nations through their responsibilities. The action plan is split into three categories including an environmental assessment called Earthwatch, environmental management, and 109 supporting measures.[2][3]

Follow-up[edit]

The Rio Declaration of 1992 "reaffirms" the Stockholm Declaration and seeks to build upon it.[4]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Astrachan, Anthony (17 March 1972). "Goals for Environment Talks Listed". The Washington Post Times-Herald.
  2. ^ a b c "Report of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment". United Nations. A/CONF.48/14/Rev.1.
  3. ^ a b UNEP. "Stockholm 1972 - Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment - United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)". www.unep.org. Archived from the original on 2015-03-14. Retrieved 2016-10-22.
  4. ^ "Rio Declaration on Environment and Development" (PDF). United Nations General Assembly. 12 August 1992. Retrieved 12 January 2021.