Decree (Belgium)

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For other uses of the term decree, see: Decree.

Decree (Dutch: decreet, French: décret) in Belgium refers to legislation passed by community or regional parliaments, except by the Brussels Parliament. Decrees have the same legal force as laws, the main difference being that laws can only be passed by the Federal Parliament.

The following legislative assemblies have the power to pass decrees: the Flemish Parliament, the Parliament of the French Community, the Walloon Parliament, the Parliament of the German-speaking Community and the Assembly of the French Community Commission, which is informally known as the Brussels Francophone Parliament. The Flemish counterpart of the Brussels Francophone Parliament, the Council of the Flemish Community Commission, does not have the power to pass decrees. Instead, it legislates by regulation.

Unlike laws, decrees are not subject to Royal Assent. Decrees are not signed and promulgated by the King, but instead they are promulgated by the community or regional government or, in case of the Brussels Francophone Parliament, by the College of the French Community Commission. Unlike ordinances, decrees are not subject to judicial review or to supervision by the Federal Government.

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