DeepArt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
DeepArt
Original author(s) Matthias Bethge, Alex Ecker, Leon Gatys, Łukasz Kidziński, Michał Warchoł
Developer(s) DeepArt UG (haftungsbeschränkt)
Initial release 1 October 2015; 3 years ago (2015-10-01)
Operating system Web application
Type Photo and video
License Freeware
Website deepart.io

DeepArt or DeepArt.io is a website that allows users to create unique artistic images by using an algorithm to redraw one image using the stylistic elements of another image.[1][2][3][4] This uses "A Neural Algorithm of Artistic Style" that was developed by several of its creators to separate style elements from a piece of art.[5][6] The tool allows users to create imitation works of art using the style of famous artists.[7][8] The neural algorithm is used by the Deep Art website to create a representation of an image provided by the user by using the 'style' of another image provided by the user.[9][10][11][12][13] A similar program, Prisma, is an iOS and Android app that was based on the open source programming that underlies DeepArt.[14][15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Culpan, Daniel (1 September 2016). "This algorithm can create an imitation Van Gogh in 60 minutes". Wired.co.uk: Wired. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  2. ^ McFarland, Matt (31 August 2015). "This algorithm can create a new Van Gogh or Picasso in just an hour". WashingtonPost.com. Washington Post. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  3. ^ Parkinson, Hannah Jane (2 September 2015). "Computer algorithm recreates Van Gogh painting in one hour". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 28 November 2016 – via The Guardian.
  4. ^ Meusers, Richard (3 September 2015). "Neuronale Netzwerke: Computer malen wie van Gogh". spiegel.de. spiegel. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  5. ^ Gatys, Leon; Ecker, Alexander; Bethge, Matthias (26 August 2015). "A Neural Algorithm of Artistic Style". arXiv:1508.06576 [cs.CV].
  6. ^ "Depart.io - About". Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  7. ^ Del Prado, Guia Marie (2 September 2015). "This artificially intelligent program can transform photos to make them look like famous paintings". uk.businessinsider.com. businessinsider. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  8. ^ Fallon, Claire (4 September 2015). "Could An Instagram Filter Turn Your Photos Into Masterful Paintings?". TheHuffingtonPost.com. The Huffington Post. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  9. ^ Weisberger, Mindy (14 April 2016). "Turn Your Photos Into Fine-Art 'Paintings' on Free Website". livescience.com. livescience. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  10. ^ Leung, Andrew (21 April 2016). "This Website Turns Your Selfies Into Works of Art Worthy of a Museum". Mic.com. Mic. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  11. ^ McFarland, Matt (15 April 2016). "With new computer technology, data imitates art - HeraldNet.com - Everett and Snohomish County news". heraldnet.com. heraldnet. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  12. ^ Brown, Molly (2 September 2015). "A computer algorithm can now create a Picasso-like painting in an hour". geekwire.com. geekwire. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  13. ^ McDonald, Glenn (11 April 2016). "A.I. Painter Emulates Great Artists". news.discovery.com. Discovery News. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  14. ^ Sawers, Paul (25 July 2016). "With 10M downloads on iOS, Prisma now lets Android users turn their photos into works of art". venturebeat.com. venturebeat. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  15. ^ Vincent, James (8 November 2016). "Now you can Facebook Live with Prisma's art filters 4". Theverge.com. The Verge. Retrieved 28 November 2016.

External links[edit]