Deep Silver

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Deep Silver
Division
IndustryVideo game industry
FoundedNovember 2002; 17 years ago (2002-11)
Headquarters,
Austria
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Eugenio Vitale (director of games development)
ProductsSee List of Deep Silver games
ParentKoch Media
Websitedeepsilver.com

Deep Silver is a German-Austrian video game publisher and a division of Koch Media.[1] Eugenio Vitale serves as the director of games development for Deep Silver.[2]

History[edit]

Deep Silver was announced in November 2002, with their first release to be Anarchy Online: The Notum Wars.[3] According to Craig McNichol, who ran Koch Media's England branch, the idea behind Deep Silver was to have a business segment that would develop games that would complement the games Koch Media was distributing on behalf of other publishers.[4] McNichol also stated that Deep Silver's name was subject to much internal discussion.[4] Koch Media invested €500,000 in Deep Silver in July 2003, and in November 2003, all of Koch Media's game publishing operations (excluding distribution) were reallocated to Deep Silver.[5][6] The division had been continuously active since, primarily in Europe.[1] In April 2008, Koch Media opened Deep Silver, Inc., a subsidiary branch based in Los Angeles, under Deep Silver's name.[7] In August 2007, Games That Matter, a studio founded by former Rockstar Vienna employees in 2006, was acquired by Koch Media and became part of Deep Silver under the name Deep Silver Vienna.[8] Co-founders Niki Laber and Hannes Seifert had left the studio by January 2010, at which point Deep Silver Vienna was shut down.[9][10] Deep Silver Vienna has only produced one game, Cursed Mountain, which was developed in association with Sproing Interactive and released in August 2009 for Wii.[11]

Deep Silver first gained widespread attention until their release of Dead Island and their acquisition of Volition.[1] Dead Island had been their first release to reach the top spot on sales charts in September 2011,[12] and they acquired Volition in January 2013, alongside the rights to the Metro series, from the bankruptcy proceedings of THQ.[13] Deep Silver also acquired a minority interest in Berlin-based free-to-play game developer Infernum Productions in December 2012.[14] In February 2013, Deep Silver announced its intentions to expand into the mobile games market.[15]

In December 2013, Fishlabs, which had filed for self-administration the previous October, was acquired by Koch Media and became Deep Silver's dedicated mobile game studio.[16] As the agreement was an asset deal, the legal entity of the studio was dissolved and Fishlabs was reorganised as a division, officially known as Deep Silver Fishlabs.[16][17] In July 2014, Deep Silver acquired the rights to Homefront and its in-development sequel, Homefront: The Revolution, from German developer Crytek.[18] Dambuster Studios (officially, Deep Silver Dambuster Studios) was established to continue the development of The Revolution, succeeding Crytek UK.[18] Later on the same day, Crytek announced that Crytek UK would be closed, and all of its staff transferred to Dambuster Studios.[19] In August 2018, Koch Media acquired the rights to the TimeSplitters games, which would be overseen by Deep Silver.[20]

In May 2020, Koch Media and THQ Nordic, by this time both part of Embracer Group, exchanged several intellectual property rights: Deep Silver received Red Faction and Painkiller, while handing off Risen, Rush for Berlin, Sacred, Second Sight, and Singles: Flirt Up Your Life.[21]

Controversy[edit]

In January 2013, Deep Silver announced a special edition of their then-upcoming game Dead Island: Riptide, titled Zombie Bait Edition, which would include a statuette of a mutilated female torso in Europe and Australia.[22] After strong criticism over the item, Deep Silver initially offered an apology, stating that they were "deeply sorry" and promising consumers that something like that would not happen again.[23] However, when the game was released in April that year, the bust was still included, generating further backlash.[23]

In January 2019, Deep Silver partnered with Epic Games on a one-year exclusivity deal for the personal computer (PC) version of their upcoming game Metro Exodus on Epic's digital distribution storefront, the Epic Games Store.[24] Through this deal, Metro Exodus was removed from Steam, another digital distribution storefront, where Deep Silver had been selling pre-orders for the game since August 2018.[25] Additionally, the deal was made and announced less than three weeks prior to game's release, causing criticism and confusion among critics and fans of the Metro franchise.[24] Valve, the company behind Steam, labelled the move as unfair to consumers, while fans review-bombed previous entries of the series on Steam.[25][26]

Games[edit]

Franchises published by Deep Silver include Metro from 4A Games and Volition's Saints Row, both of which were acquired through THQ's bankruptcy auction in 2013, as well as Techland-created Dead Island. Other games include Homefront: The Revolution by Dambuster Studios and Shenmue III by Ys Net.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Handrahan, Matthew (4 February 2013). "Koch Media: "We are not ambitious to be the next THQ"". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  2. ^ Dring, Christopher (9 October 2017). "Life after Agents of Mayhem: Where now for Volition?". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 25 February 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  3. ^ Steininger, Stefan (12 November 2002). "Koch Media etabliert neues Label für Games". beta.gamesmarkt.de. Archived from the original on 16 May 2019. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  4. ^ a b McNichol, Craig (5 August 2014). "Twenty years of Koch Media". MCV. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  5. ^ "Koch Media investiert 500.000 Euro in Deep Silver". beta.gamesmarkt.de. Archived from the original on 15 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  6. ^ "Koch Media konzentriert Spielepublishing auf Deep Silver". beta.gamesmarkt.de. Archived from the original on 15 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  7. ^ MCV Editors (30 April 2008). "Koch Media expands into US". MCV. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  8. ^ Martin, Matt (22 August 2007). "Koch acquires Games That Matter". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 14 February 2019. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  9. ^ Brice, Kath (1 February 2010). "Koch closes Deep Silver Vienna studio". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 13 February 2019. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Koch Media schließt Deep Silver Vienna". beta.gamesmarkt.de. Archived from the original on 15 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  11. ^ Alexander, Leigh (1 February 2010). "Deep Silver Closes Vienna Studio". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on 10 December 2017. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  12. ^ MCV Editors (15 September 2011). "Deep Silver Dead pleased with first No.1". MCV. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  13. ^ Goldfarb, Andrew (23 January 2013). "THQ Dissolved, Saints Row, Company of Heroes Devs Acquired". IGN. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  14. ^ Handrahan, Matthew (18 December 2012). "Koch Media invests in F2P dev Infernum Productions". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  15. ^ Weber, Rachel (26 February 2013). "Deep Silver planning move into mobile". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 2 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  16. ^ a b Corriea, Alexa Ray (2 December 2013). "Galaxy on Fire developer Fishlabs purchased by Koch Media". Polygon. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  17. ^ Chapple, Craig (14 May 2014). "'It was the hardest time we've ever gone through': How Fishlabs came back from the brink". MCV. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  18. ^ a b Sarkar, Samit (30 July 2014). "Deep Silver buys Homefront from Crytek, moves Homefront: The Revolution to new studio". Polygon. Archived from the original on 9 December 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  19. ^ Sarkar, Samit (30 July 2014). "Homefront: The Revolution devs to move to Deep Silver as Crytek scales back two studios". Polygon. Archived from the original on 19 August 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  20. ^ Dransfield, Ian (15 August 2018). "Timesplitters license acquired by Koch Media". Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  21. ^ Wood, Austin (5 May 2020). "Red Faction, Painkiller, Risen and more get closer to home in THQ Nordic and Koch Media IP trade". GamesRadar+. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  22. ^ Corriea, Alexa Ray (23 April 2013). "Dead Island: Riptide edition with severed torso statue still available in Europe, Australia". Polygon. Archived from the original on 2 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  23. ^ a b Parfitt, Ben (23 April 2013). "So Deep Silver went ahead and shipped the Dead Island Riptide Zombie Bait Edition regardless". MCV. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  24. ^ a b Williams, Mike (29 January 2019). "Metro Exodus' Sudden Switch to Epic Really is Unfair". USgamer. Archived from the original on 7 February 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  25. ^ a b Orland, Kyle (28 January 2019). "Epic Games Store snags Metro Exodus away from Steam [Updated]". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 3 February 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  26. ^ Chalk, Andy (30 January 2019). "Players protest Epic's Metro Exodus exclusive by review-bombing the series on Steam". PC Gamer. Archived from the original on 5 February 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2019.

External links[edit]