Delaware Avenue Historic District (Buffalo, New York)

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Delaware Avenue Historic District
20090412 Greater Buffalo American Red Cross Building.JPG
Greater Buffalo American Red Cross Building
Delaware Avenue Historic District (Buffalo, New York) is located in New York
Delaware Avenue Historic District (Buffalo, New York)
Delaware Avenue Historic District (Buffalo, New York) is located in the US
Delaware Avenue Historic District (Buffalo, New York)
Location W side of Delaware Ave. between North and Bryant Sts., Buffalo, New York
Coordinates 42°54′20″N 78°52′23″W / 42.90556°N 78.87306°W / 42.90556; -78.87306Coordinates: 42°54′20″N 78°52′23″W / 42.90556°N 78.87306°W / 42.90556; -78.87306
Area 15 acres (6.1 ha)
Architect Gilbert, Charles Pierrepont
Architectural style Renaissance, Gothic
NRHP Reference #

74001232

[1]
Added to NRHP January 17, 1974
Delaware Avenue Historic District

Delaware Avenue Historic District is a national historic district located at Buffalo, New York, United States, and Erie County. It is located along the west side of Delaware Avenue (New York State Route 384) between North Street to the South and Bryant Street to the North. When listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, the district encompassed 17 contributing buildings and 1 contributing structure reflective of when Buffalo had more millionaires per capita than any city in America, and this was once Millionaires' Mile. The mansions were built between about 1890 and World War I and reflect Renaissance Revival and Gothic Revival style architecture. Notable buildings include the Westminster Presbyterian Church (1858), the George and Charles Williams Houses (1894, 1896) by McKim, Mead & White, Stephen M. Clement House (1913) by Edward Brodhead Green (now Greater Buffalo American Red Cross Building), Seymour Knox House (1915) by Charles Pierrepont Gilbert, George Brewster Matthews House (1901), Thomas R. Lockwood House (1888), Buffalo Association for the Blind (1898) by Esenwein & Johnson, and Charles W. Goodyear House / Oracle Charter School (1903, formerly Bishop McMahon High School) by Edward Brodhead Green.[2][3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved May 1, 2016. [permanent dead link] Note: This includes Cornelia E. Brooke (December 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Delaware Avenue Historic District" (PDF). Retrieved May 1, 2016.  and Accompanying photographs
  3. ^ "Introduction to Buffalo, NY". Frommer's. Wiley Publishing, Inc. Retrieved April 8, 2009. 

External links[edit]