Delhi (village), New York

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Delhi, New York
Village
Delhi is located in New York
Delhi
Delhi
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 42°16′44″N 74°54′59″W / 42.27889°N 74.91639°W / 42.27889; -74.91639Coordinates: 42°16′44″N 74°54′59″W / 42.27889°N 74.91639°W / 42.27889; -74.91639
Country United States
State New York
County Delaware
Town Delhi
Area
 • Total 3.19 sq mi (8.27 km2)
 • Land 3.14 sq mi (8.14 km2)
 • Water 0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation 1,371 ft (418 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 3,087
 • Density 982/sq mi (379.3/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 13753
Area code(s) 607
FIPS code 36-20126
GNIS feature ID 0948275
Website villageofdelhi.com

Delhi (/dɛlˈh/ del-HY) is a village in Delaware County, New York, United States. The population was 3,087 at the 2010 census.[1] Delhi is the county seat of Delaware County. The accepted pronunciation is Del-HY rather than Del-EE.

Delhi village is within the town of Delhi on Routes 10 and 28.

The State University of New York at Delhi, partially within the village limits, is located southwest of the town hall.[2]

Delhi was formally incorporated as a village in 1821.

Geography[edit]

Delhi is located in the center of the town of Delhi at 42°16′44″N 74°54′59″W / 42.27889°N 74.91639°W / 42.27889; -74.91639 (42.278926, -74.916408),[3] northeast of the geographic center of Delaware County. New York State Route 10 passes through the village as it follows the valley of the West Branch Delaware River, leading northeast 20 miles (32 km) to Stamford and southwest 16 miles (26 km) to Walton. NY 28 also passes through the village, leading northwest 20 miles (32 km) to Oneonta and southeast 69 miles (111 km) to Kingston.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2), of which 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 1.57%, is water. The West Branch Delaware River flows through the village from northeast to southwest.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,201
1870 1,223 1.8%
1880 1,384 13.2%
1890 1,564 13.0%
1900 2,078 32.9%
1910 1,736 −16.5%
1920 1,669 −3.9%
1930 1,840 10.2%
1940 1,841 0.1%
1950 2,223 20.7%
1960 2,307 3.8%
1970 3,017 30.8%
1980 3,374 11.8%
1990 3,064 −9.2%
2000 2,583 −15.7%
2010 3,087 19.5%
Est. 2014 3,074 [4] −0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 2,583 people, 714 households, and 404 families residing in the village. The population density was 812.2 people per square mile (313.6/km²). There were 818 housing units at an average density of 257.2 per square mile (99.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 87.77% White, 6.97% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.82% Asian, 1.55% from other races, and 1.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.30% of the population.

There were 714 households out of which 25.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.5% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.3% were non-families. 34.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the village the population was spread out with 13.2% under the age of 18, 44.7% from 18 to 24, 14.8% from 25 to 44, 15.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 21 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.5 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $32,708, and the median income for a family was $42,692. Males had a median income of $27,109 versus $21,800 for females. The per capita income for the village was $13,421. About 8.1% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.5% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Cultural references[edit]

Delhi is the setting for the award-winning children's book My Side of the Mountain.

The village is depicted as "Walleye" in the book It Takes a Village Idiot, Complicating the Simple Life (isbn 0-7432-1131-6) by Jim Mullen, about his problems adapting to the rural lifestyle.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Delhi village, New York". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 9, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Delhi village, New York." United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on April 29, 2009.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]