Democratic Coalition for DC Election

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The Democratic Coalition for DC Election (Chinese: 泛民區選聯盟) is an electoral co-ordination mechanism run by pan-democratic parties to avoid clashes between allies in the District Council elections.

It was first created for the 2007 District Council election by pan-democracy parties including the Power for Democracy, the Civic Party, the League of Social Democrats (LSD), the Democratic Party, the Hong Kong Association for Democracy and People's Livelihood (ADPL), the Social Democratic Front, the Frontier, the Network for Women in Politics, the Neighbourhood and Workers Service Centre (NWSC) and the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions.[1]

The coalition aimed at filling only one pan-democratic candidate in each constituency and successfully decreased clashes in more than 30 constituencies to only 10.[1] The coalition eventually filled 296 candidates in which 108 of them were elected.

In the 2011 District Council election, the coalition supported 236 pan-democratic candidates in which 88 of them were elected.

In the 2015 District Council election, the coalition will support 213 pan-democratic candidates. Many new pro-democracy groups formed by young people after the Occupy movement and some of them coordinated with the coalition. However, six of them refused to do so and are running against the Democratic Party in areas where the party has had a close fight with the pro-Beijing camp in previous elections.[2]

Electoral performance[edit]

District Council elections[edit]

Election Number of
popular votes
% of
popular votes
Total
elected seats
+/−
2007 409,573Steady 35.97Steady
108 / 405
0Steady
2011 369,461Decrease 31.29Decrease
88 / 412
9Decrease
2015 451,765Increase 31.25Decrease
105 / 431
21Increase

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "泛 民 區 選 十 選 區 撞 人". Sing Tao Daily. 4 July 2007.
  2. ^ Ng, Joyce (22 October 2015). "On the warpath: 'umbrella soldiers' challenge old guard in Hong Kong's district council elections". South China Morning Post.