Democratic Justice Party

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Democratic Justice Party

민주정의당
Minju Jeonguidang
FounderChun Doo-hwan
Founded1 September 1980
Dissolved22 January 1990
Preceded byDemocratic Republican Party
Merged intoDemocratic Liberal Party
HeadquartersSeoul, South Korea
IdeologyNational Conservatism
Anti-communism
Korean nationalism
Neoliberalism
Social justice
Authoritarianism (until 1987)
Political positionRight-wing[1]
International affiliationInternational Democrat Union
ColoursLight blue and red
Democratic Justice Party
Hangul
민주정의당
Hanja
民主正義黨
Revised RomanizationMinju Jeong-uidang
McCune–ReischauerMinju Chŏng-ŭitang

The Democratic Justice Party (DJP) (민주정의당) was the ruling party of South Korea from 1980 to 1988. It was formed in 1980 as the Democratic Republican Party and was the political vehicle for Chun Doo-hwan.

When 1979, Park Chung-hee's assassination, Chun Doo-hwan of the party created it the 'Democratic Justice Party' in 1980. Even though a less authoritarian constitution was enacted that year, the political system was rigged heavily in favor of the DJP. The situation changed in 1987, when DJP presidential candidate Roh Tae Woo promised that year's election would be free and democratic. In 1990, the DJP merged with Kim Young Sam's Reunification Democratic Party and Kim Jong-pil's New Democratic Republican Party to form the Democratic Liberal Party.

Election results[edit]

Presidential elections[edit]

Election Candidate Total votes Share of votes Outcome
1981 Chun Doo-hwan 4,755 (electoral vote) 90.2%' Elected Green tickY
1987 Roh Tae-woo 8,282,738 36.6% Elected Green tickY

Legislative elections[edit]

Election Total seats won Total votes Share of votes Outcome of election Election leader
1981
151 / 276
5,776,624 35.6% Increase83 seats; Majority Chun Doo-hwan
1985
148 / 276
7,040,811 34.0% Decrease3 seats; Majority Chun Doo-hwan
1988
125 / 299
6,675,494 34.0% Decrease23 seats; Minority Roh Tae-woo

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kim, Youngmi (2011), The Politics of Coalition in Korea: Between institutions and culture, Routledge, p. 36