Page semi-protected

Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020

← 2016
2024 →

4,763 delegate votes to the Democratic National Convention
2,382 delegate votes needed to win

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton



The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses will be a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the 4,051 delegates to the Democratic National Convention and determine the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. The elections will take place within all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. An extra 716 unpledged delegates (712 votes) or superdelegates, including party leaders and elected officials, will be appointed by the party leadership independently of the primaries' electoral process. The convention will also approve the party's platform and vice-presidential nominee.

Following the 2016 presidential elections, significant changes were proposed that would change the number and role of superdelegates in the nomination process.[1] Changes were enacted on August 25, 2018, which would only allow them to vote on the first ballot at a convention if it were uncontested.[2]

Candidates

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls:

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
John Delaney 113th Congress official photo.jpg
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 55)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. Representative from Maryland since 2013 Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
July 28, 2017
Delaney 2020.png
(CampaignWebsite)
FEC Filing
[3]
MAJ Richard Ojeda.jpg
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 48)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia State Senator since 2016
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from West Virginia in 2018
Flag of West Virginia.svg
West Virginia
November 12, 2018

(Website)
FEC Filing
[4]

Other declared candidates

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Michael E. Arth in New Smyrna Beach, FL. Taken on March 1, 2018, by Shasta Solis. 01.jpg
Michael E. Arth
April 27, 1953
(age 65)
Burtonwood, England
Urban designer & public policy analyst
Candidate for Governor of Florida in 2010
Flag of Florida.svg
Florida
November 4, 2018
(Website)
FEC filing
[5]
Ken-E-Nwadike-Jr-motivational-speaker.jpg
Ken Nwadike Jr.
December 29, 1981
(age 36)
San Diego, California
Peace activist, inspirational speaker, and video journalist Flag of California.svg
California
October 18, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
[6]
Robby Wells.PNG
Robby Wells
April 10, 1968
(age 50)
Bartow, Georgia
Former college football coach
Candidate for President in 2012 and 2016
Flag of Georgia (U.S. state).svg
Georgia
May 24, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
[7]
Andrew Yang talking about urban entrepreneurship at Techonomy Conference 2015 in Detroit, MI (cropped).jpg
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 43)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur Flag of New York.svg
New York
November 6, 2017
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.png
(Website)
FEC Filing
[8]

Individuals who are formally exploring a candidacy

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months.

Speculative candidates

The following people have been subjects of speculation about their potential candidacy within the last six months, although they have neither personally expressed interest nor declined to run.

Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

National convention

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled for July 13–16, 2020.[163]

On June 20, 2018, the DNC announced four finalist bidders under consideration for the convention site: Houston, Texas,[164] Miami Beach, Florida[165] (hosted the 1972 convention), Milwaukee, Wisconsin,[166] and Denver, Colorado. However, Denver immediately withdrew from consideration, citing scheduling conflicts.[167]

Endorsements

John Delaney
Individuals
Andrew Yang
Individuals

Primary election polling

National polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Michael
Bloomberg
Cory
Booker
Sherrod
Brown
Hillary
Clinton
Andrew
Cuomo
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Eric
Holder
Beto
O'Rourke
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Oprah
Winfrey
Other Undecided
Morning Consult November 7–9, 2018 733 ± 4.0% 26% 2% 3% 1% 1% 1% 4% 0% 8% 19% 5% 9%[b] 21%
HarrisX November 5–6, 2018 680 ± 3.8% 25% 4% 3% 12% 4% 18% 4% 30%
CNN/SSRS October 4–7, 2018 464 33% 4% 5% 1% 9% 3% 4% 13% 8% 12%[c] 6%
Zogby Analytics August 6–8, 2018 576 ± 4.1% 27% 4% 2% 3% 2% 5% 2% 16% 7% 3%[d] 31%
GQR Research/Democracy Corps July 19–26, 2018 443 30% 8% 5% 28% 13% 8%[e] 9%
Harvard-Harris June 24–25, 2018 533 32% 3% 6% 18% 1% 1% 2% 16% 10% 12%
Zogby Analytics June 4–6, 2018 495 ± 4.4% 21% 4% 0% 4% 1% 5% 1% 19% 6% 10% 1%[f] 29%
Saint Leo University May 25–31, 2018 19% 2% 1% 4% 2% 4% 6% 9% 4% 15% 9%[g] 21%
Zogby Analytics May 10–12, 2018 533 ± 4.2% 26% 3% 1% 2% 1% 4% 1% 18% 8% 14% 3%[h] 22%
January 2018 polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Hillary
Clinton
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Amy
Klobuchar
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Oprah
Winfrey
Other Undecided
Civis Analytics January 2018 29% 27% 17%
Harvard-Harris January 13–16, 2018 711 27% 4% 13% 1% 4% 16% 10% 13% 12%[i]
USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times December 15, 2017 – January 15, 2018 1,576 ± 3.0% 28% 3% 19% 2% 5% 1% 22% 11% 4%
RABA Research January 10–11, 2018 345 ± 5.0% 26% 21% 18% 20% 15%
SurveyMonkey/Axios January 10–11, 2018 22% 3% 4% 7% 17% 16% 16% 9%[j]
Emerson College January 8–11, 2018 216 27% 3% 3% 2% 2% 23% 9% 13%[k] 19%
GQR Research/Democracy Corps January 6–11, 2018 442 26% 6% 29% 14% 8% 12%[l] 6%
2016–17 polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Sherrod
Brown
Julian
Castro
Mark
Cuban
Andrew
Cuomo
Al
Franken
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Amy
Klobuchar
Terry
McAuliffe
Michelle
Obama
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Mark
Zuckerberg
Undecided
Zogby Analytics October 2017 682 19% 2% 1% 3% 1% 2% 22% 18% 8% 4% 20%
Zogby Analytics September 2017 356 17% 3% 3% 6% 1% 1% 28% 12% 7% 23%
Gravis Marketing July 21–31, 2017 21% 4% 7% 1% 2% 6% 1% 43%
Public Policy Polling December 6–7, 2016 400 ± 4.9% 31% 4% 2% 0% 2% 3% 3% 24% 16% 14%
Two-way matchups
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Oprah
Winfrey
Undecided
Morning Consult January 11–16, 2018 689 54% 31% 15%
23% 44% 34%
46% 37% 17%
35% 39% 26%

Statewide polling

Iowa
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Julian
Castro
Andrew
Cuomo
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Eric
Holder
Amy
Klobuchar
Martin
O'Malley
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Other Undecided
David Binder Research (D-Focus on Rural America) September 20–23, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 37% 8% 2% 10% 2% 12% 16% 2%[m] 9%
Public Policy Polling (D-O'Say Can You See PAC) March 3–6, 2017 1,062 17% 4% 8% 3% 3% 11% 18% 1%[n] 32%
New Hampshire
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Eric
Holder
Joe
Kennedy III
Martin
O'Malley
Deval
Patrick
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Other Undecided
University of New Hampshire August 2–19, 2018 198 ± 7.0% 19% 6% 0% 3% 2% 7% 1% 30% 17% 2%[o] 12%
Suffolk University April 26–30, 2018 295 ± 5.7% 20% 8% 2% 4% 4% 13% 26% 2%[p] 18%
30% 10% 3% 6% 8% 25% 2%[q] 12%
University of New Hampshire April 13–22, 2018 188 ± 7.1% 26% 5% 1% 6% 3% 2% 28% 11% 4%[r] 13%
American Research Group March 21–27, 2018 400 ± 5.0% 58% 33% 8%
47% 45% 7%
University of New Hampshire January 28 – February 10, 2018 219 ± 6.6% 35% 3% 2% 1% 1% 24% 15% 4%[s] 15%
University of New Hampshire October 3–15, 2017 212 ± 6.7% 24% 6% 1% 1% 3% 31% 13% 11%[t] 11%
Florida
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Sherrod
Brown
Andrew
Cuomo
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Kamala
Harris
Eric
Holder
Chris
Murphy
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Oprah
Winfrey
Other Undecided
Saint Leo University May 25–31, 2018 21% 3% 3% 2% 2% 4% 5% 2% 11% 7% 17% 5%[u] 17%
Delaware
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Julian
Castro
Andrew
Cuomo
John
Delaney
Kamala
Harris
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided
Gravis Marketing July 24–29, 2018 354 ± 5.2% 47% 5% 1% 1% 0% 3% 5% 9% 29%

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m This individual is not a member of the Democratic Party, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.
  2. ^ Steve Bullock, Julian Castro, Eric Garcetti, Amy Klobuchar, Gavin Newsom, and Howard Schultz with 1%; Michael Avenatti, John Delaney, and Deval Patrick with 0%; other with 3%
  3. ^ John Kerry with 5%; Eric Garcetti with 2%; Michael Avenatti, Amy Klobuchar, and Deval Patrick with 1%; Steve Bullock and John Delaney with <1%; other with 2%
  4. ^ John Delaney, Terry McAuliffe, and Deval Patrick with 1%
  5. ^ "A governor, like Terry McAuliffe of Virginia, Steve Bullock of Montana or John Hickenlooper of Colorado" and Howard Schultz with 2%; Tom Steyer and Mitch Landrieu with 1%; other with 2%
  6. ^ Terry McAuliffe with 1%; Deval Patrick with 0%
  7. ^ Steve Bullock and Mitch Landrieu with 3%; Chris Murphy with 1%; Terry McAuliffe and Deval Patrick with 0%; other with 1%
  8. ^ Deval Patrick with 1%; Terry McAuliffe with 0%
  9. ^ Andrew Cuomo with 2%; other with 10%
  10. ^ Tom Steyer with 1%; other with 8%
  11. ^ Jason Kander with 4%; other with 9%
  12. ^ "A woman senator like Harris or Gillibrand" with 5%; "Moderate Governors Hickenlooper or McAuliffe" and "A cultural figure like Tom Hanks or Dwayne 'the Rock' Johnson" with 2%; "A businessman like Tom Steyer or Howard Schultz", "A young lawmaker like Murphy or Castro", and "A mayor of a major city like de Blasio or Villaraigosa" with 1%; other with 0%
  13. ^ Michael Avenatti and John Delaney with 1%; Steve Bullock, Eric Garcetti, Mitch Landrieu, and Deval Patrick with <1%; other with 1%
  14. ^ Sheryl Sandberg with 4%; Howard Schultz with 1%
  15. ^ John Delaney and John Hickenlooper with 0%; other with 2%
  16. ^ Terry McAuliffe with 2%
  17. ^ Terry McAuliffe with 2%; other with 1%
  18. ^ John Hickenlooper and Amy Klobuchar with 1%; Tim Ryan with 0%; other with 2%
  19. ^ Amy Klobuchar with 0%; other with 4%
  20. ^ John Hickenlooper and Mark Zuckerberg with 2%; Amy Klobuchar and Tim Ryan with 1%; John Delaney with 0%; other with 5%
  21. ^ Steve Bullock, Mitch Landrieu, Deval Patrick, and Terry McAuliffe with 1%; other with 2%

References

  1. ^ "DNC advances changes to presidential nominating process". USA TODAY. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  2. ^ David Siders; Natasha Korecki (August 25, 2018). "Democrats strip superdelegates of power in picking presidential nominee". Politico. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  3. ^ Delaney, John (July 28, 2017). "John Delaney: Why I'm running for president". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 28, 2017.
  4. ^ "WATCH: W.Va. Sen. Richard Ojeda officially announces run for president in 2020". WSAZ. November 12, 2018. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  5. ^ Arth, Michael E. (November 4, 2018). "FEC Form 2" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  6. ^ Nwadike, Kenneth E. (October 18, 2017). "FEC FORM 2" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  7. ^ "Jain body holds oath- taking event". Daily News and Analysis. October 9, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  8. ^ Yang, Andrew. "FEC FORM 2" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  9. ^ Jacobs, Ben (August 2, 2018). "New Age author Marianne Williamson 'looking into' 2020 presidential run". The Guardian. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  10. ^ "Oprah pal and spirituality guru plans 2020 run". POLITICO. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  11. ^ Kwong, Jessica (July 4, 2018). "MICHAEL AVENATTI SAYS HE'D 'ABSOLUTELY' BEAT DONALD TRUMP IN 2020 ELECTION AND 'BE HIS WORST NIGHTMARE'". Newsweek. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  12. ^ Pfannenstiel, Brianne (August 9, 2018). "Michael Avenatti in Iowa: 'I'm exploring a run for the presidency of the United States'". Des Moines Register. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  13. ^ Ball, Molly; Abramson, Alana (October 25, 2018). "Michael Avenatti's Past Won't Stop Him From Running in 2020". Time. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  14. ^ Sampathkumar, Mythili (July 18, 2018). "Joe Biden reveals deadline for decision over his 2020 presidential bid". The Independent. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  15. ^ Stromquist, Kat (June 5, 2018). "At Joe Biden's New Orleans appearance, further hints of a 2020 run". Gambit. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
  16. ^ "Joe Biden reveals how he'll decide whether to run for president in 2020". CBS News. October 18, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  17. ^ "De Blasio for president in 2020? He isn't ruling it out". SI Live. November 9, 2018.
  18. ^ Laura Nahmias; Terry Golway; Daniel Lippman (November 12, 2018). "DE BLASIO pushes for legal defense fund — TRUMP mulls end to Puerto Rico aid — CUOMO's end run around City Council on AMAZON". Politico New York Playbook. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  19. ^ "Michael Bloomberg Considering 2020 Presidential Run, Sources Tell CBS2". WCBS-TV. June 26, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  20. ^ King, John; Geldon, Ben (June 24, 2018). "Why Michael Bloomberg may be eyeing a 2020 run". CNN. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  21. ^ Siders, David (August 28, 2018). "Bloomberg to headline Pennsylvania Democratic fundraiser". Politico. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  22. ^ "Michael Bloomberg 'To Challenge Trump in 2020 as Democrat'". JTA. 16 September 2018.
  23. ^ Jonathan Van Meter (September 19, 2018). "Can I Get a Hug? Cory Booker's got a lot of love to give, and he's betting that's what it will take to win in 2020". New York. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  24. ^ Edward-Isaac Dovere (October 8, 2018). "Cory Booker's Four Standing Ovations in Des Moines". The Atlantic. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  25. ^ Hunter Walker (November 13, 2018). "Cory Booker: I will 'take some time over the coming months' to consider 2020 bid". Yahoo! News. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  26. ^ Wehrman, Jessica. "Sherrod Brown for president? He's thinking about it". The Columbus Dispatch.
  27. ^ Leigh Ann Caldwell (November 15, 2018). "Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey on a presidential bid: 'We'll see'". NBC News. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  28. ^ Sganga, Nicole; O'Keefe, Ed; Conant, Caitlin (May 15, 2018). "Democrats eyeing 2020 test their pitches at progressive conference". CBS News. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  29. ^ Andy Kroll (October 16, 2018). "Julián Castro Gives His Clearest Signal Yet He's Running in 2020". Rolling Stone. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  30. ^ "Hillary Clinton leaves door open for 2020 run: 'I'd like to be president'". The Hill. October 28, 2018. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  31. ^ Martin Rogers (September 11, 2018). "Oscar De La Hoya says he will run for United States president". USA Today. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  32. ^ Alex Thompson (October 19, 2018). "Tulsi Gabbard weighing 2020 presidential bid". Politico. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  33. ^ "L.A. Mayor Garcetti Says He'll Make Presidential Run Decision Next Year". Bloomberg News. June 8, 2018. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  34. ^ Keller, Megan (October 21, 2018). "Los Angeles mayor says he will make decision about 2020 by end of year". The Hill. Retrieved October 24, 2018.
  35. ^ Debendetti, Gabriel (October 12, 2018). "Kirsten Gillibrand on the Kavanaugh Fallout, What She Expects in the Midterms, and Her 2020 Plans". New York. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  36. ^ Goldmacher, Shane (October 20, 2018). "Gillibrand's (Lack of) Spending in 2018 Offers Hints of 2020". The New York Times. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  37. ^ Kilgore, Ed (October 25, 2018). "Gillibrand Rules Out 2020 Presidential Run". New York. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  38. ^ Shane Goldmacher (November 9, 2018). "Fresh Off Re-election, Gillibrand Says She Is Giving 'Long, Hard Thought' to 2020 Run". The New York Times. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  39. ^ Hunt, Kasie (June 25, 2018). "Sen. Kamala Harris not ruling out 2020 White House run". NBC News. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  40. ^ Edward-Isaac Dovere (October 5, 2018). "An Unmistakable Sign Kamala Harris Is Running in 2020". The Atlantic. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  41. ^ David Siders (October 16, 2018). "How Kamala Harris' team thinks she can win the 2020 nomination". Politico. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  42. ^ Kyle Trygstad (September 18, 2018). "John Hickenlooper Is the Antithesis of Trump—And Might Run Against Him in 2020". The Atlantic. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  43. ^ Doom, Justin (July 24, 2018). "Eric Holder tells Stephen Colbert 'I'm thinking about' running for president". ABC News. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  44. ^ Korecki, Natasha (October 1, 2018). "Inslee: I'm not ruling out a 2020 run". Politico. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  45. ^ Hager, Mary (August 31, 2018). "John Kerry won't rule out 2020 White House run". CBS News. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  46. ^ Krawchenko, Katiana (April 13, 2018). "Terry McAuliffe: If I ran against Trump "I'd beat him"". CBS News. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  47. ^ Beaumont, Thomas (September 19, 2018). "Former Virginia Gov. McAuliffe Says He's Not Ruling Out 2020 Campaign". NBC 4. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  48. ^ Stolberg, Sheryl (June 22, 2018). "Senator Jeff Merkley, a Quiet Stalwart of the Left, Has a Breakout Moment at the Border". The New York Times. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  49. ^ Jacobs, Ben (October 21, 2018). "2020 vision: Democratic hopefuls warm up for White House race". the Guardian.
  50. ^ Lukitsch, Bill. "Presidential hopefuls for 2020-- declared and undeclared -- are stopping in Q-C, Iowa with midterms on the horizon". QC Times.com.
  51. ^ Mike Brest (November 16, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke Changes His Tune On Potential 2020 Run". The Daily Caller. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  52. ^ Christian M. Wade (October 30, 2018). "Patrick sits out former deputy's run for governor". Andover Townsman. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  53. ^ Edward-Isaac Dovere (October 29, 2018). "The Campaign Deval Patrick Is Searching For". The Atlantic. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  54. ^ Darren Sands (October 23, 2018). "Top Obama Allies Are Ready To Support A Deval Patrick Presidential Campaign". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  55. ^ Nik DeCosta-Klipa (12 November 2018). "Michelle Obama reportedly met with Deval Patrick's wife about his potential 2020 run". Boston.com.
  56. ^ Merica, Dan (August 28, 2018). "Tim Ryan weighs his next move: Take on Pelosi or Trump". CNN. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  57. ^ "Bernie Sanders Is Not Not Running In 2020". The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. August 15, 2018. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  58. ^ a b Edward-Isaac Dovere (October 21, 2018). "Sanders and Warren Are Heading for a Stand-off". The Atlantic. Retrieved October 21, 2018.
  59. ^ Whitten, Sarah; Cheddar Berk, Christina (June 5, 2018). "Howard Schultz on presidential speculation: 'Let's see what happens'". CNBC.
  60. ^ Hasson, Peter (May 29, 2018). "STARBUCKS CHAIRMAN WON'T RULE OUT 2020 CHALLENGE TO TRUMP [VIDEO]". The Daily Caller. Retrieved June 20, 2018.
  61. ^ Schwartz, Brian (August 23, 2018). "Billionaire Tom Steyer is seriously looking into running for president as he pushes to impeach Trump". CNBC. NBC Universal. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  62. ^ Marinucci, Carla; White, Jeremy B.; Parthasarathy, Maya (August 14, 2018). "STEYER raises the stakes: New $10 million voter drive -- SWALWELL not ruling out 2020 -- ERIC TRUMP on Fresno radio -- SIXTH firefighter dies battling wildfires". Politico. Retrieved August 17, 2018.
  63. ^ Alexander Burns (September 29, 2018). "Elizabeth Warren Says 2020 Presidential Run Is On the Table". The New York Times. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  64. ^ McGrane, Victoria (September 29, 2018). "Warren says she will 'take a hard look at running for president'". Boston Globe. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  65. ^ "Possible 2020 candidate Montana Gov. Steve Bullock to campaign for Iowa Democrats". Des Moines Register.
  66. ^ Dan Balz (October 2, 2018). "Will the Democrats Wake Up Before 2020?". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  67. ^ Anne Helen Petersen (September 29, 2018). "Could This Unknown Montana Governor Be Our Next President?". Buzzfeed News. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  68. ^ Brianna Provenzano (October 15, 2018). "How rising-star Democrat Pete Buttigieg wants to change the way we think about politics". Mic.
  69. ^ Swanson, Ian (5 April 2018). "Mayors look for opening in Democratic White House field". The Hill.
  70. ^ "Importantville: Post-Midterm Takeaways". Indianapolis Monthly. 8 November 2018.
  71. ^ Zanotti, Emily (September 4, 2018). "RAHM FOR PREZ? Chicago Mayor Announces He WON'T Run For Re-Election". Daily Wire. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  72. ^ Fearnow, Benjamin (September 4, 2018). "Why Isn't Rahm Emanuel Running for Chicago Mayor Again?". Newsweek. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  73. ^ CNN, Analysis by Chris Cillizza and Harry Enten,. "There's a new No. 1 among 2020 Democrats".
  74. ^ "Who's overrated and who's underrated as a 2020 Democratic presidential prospect?". Vox.
  75. ^ "Could Minnesota's Amy Klobuchar Make A Run In 2020?". Patch. 30 September 2018.
  76. ^ "Another upgrade: Klobuchar seen as 6th most likely 2020 Dem nominee". MinnPost. 19 October 2018.
  77. ^ Litten, Edward-Isaac (July 8, 2018). "Mitch Landrieu Wants to Know: Does He Have to Run for President?". Politico. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  78. ^ Greenwood, Max (July 29, 2018). "Potential dark horse 2020 Dem: 'I don't think abolishing ICE is a good idea'". The Hill. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
  79. ^ Wheeler, David R. (August 20, 2018). "McRaven for president in 2020". CNN.
  80. ^ Foster, Caitlin (August 24, 2018). "After his op-ed slamming Trump, the Navy SEAL who oversaw the Bin Laden raid is being eyed as a political contender for 2020". Business Insider. Retrieved October 24, 2018.
  81. ^ Hennessey, Susan; Fogel, Mikhaila (August 18, 2018). "An Admiral Speaks Out". The Atlantic.
  82. ^ Wire, Sarah D. "It's no secret that Rep. Adam Schiff has higher ambitions. What's his next political move?". Los Angeles Times.
  83. ^ Sands, Darren (August 7, 2018). "Al Sharpton Won't Rule Out A Run For President In 2020". BuzzFeed. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  84. ^ Schwartz, Brian (8 June 2018). "Democratic donors push Mark Warner to enter 2020 race as moderate alternative to Warren, Sanders". CNBC.
  85. ^ Gilliland, Donald (10 August 2018). "Dustbin 2020: The best Dems who surely won't get the nomination". The Hill.
  86. ^ Richards, Sam (March 30, 2017). "Jerry Brown for president? 'Don't rule it out!'". Contra Costa Times. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  87. ^ Steinmetz, Katy (September 9, 2017). "The Philosopher King". Time. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  88. ^ Zurko, Roz (March 26, 2017). "IS HILLARY GROOMING CHELSEA CLINTON FOR WHITE HOUSE IN 2020 – CHELSEA VS TRUMP? [OPINION]". Inquisitr. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
  89. ^ Setoodeh, Ramin (March 29, 2017). "Chelsea Clinton: 'I Am Not Running for Public Office' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  90. ^ Paget, Antonia (November 9, 2016). "Not happy with Trump as POTUS? There could be another celebrity candidate on the cards". Daily Express. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  91. ^ Parker, Mike (February 12, 2017). "George Clooney is preparing for his biggest role yet: 2020 US elections". Daily Express. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  92. ^ Wilstein, Matt (February 24, 2017). "George Clooney Gets Political at César Awards: Trump Gives 'Comfort to Our Enemies'". The Daily Beast. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  93. ^ Dovere, Edward-Isaac (July 18, 2017). "Can Roy Cooper Show Democrats How to Win Again?". Politico. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  94. ^ Moody, Aaron; Specht, Paul A. (March 29, 2018). "Roy Cooper for president? 'I'm sure I'll get some calls.'". The News & Observer. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  95. ^ Smith, Allan (February 13, 2017). "Mark Cuban offers cryptic response when asked if he's considering future presidential bid". Business Insider. Retrieved February 25, 2017.
  96. ^ Smith, Allan (February 23, 2017). "Poll shows Mark Cuban in surprisingly competitive position against Trump in prospective 2020 race". Business Insider. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  97. ^ "Mark Cuban ruling out 2020 presidential run....for now". Sports Illustrated. March 16, 2017. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  98. ^ Spector, Joseph (November 21, 2017). "Cuomo 2020? Four things to watch". The Journal News. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  99. ^ Klepper, David (January 4, 2018). "New York governor's DC attacks prompt 2020 speculation". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 5, 2018.
  100. ^ Donato, Christopher (August 29, 2018). "Andrew Cuomo says he won't run for president in 2020 during New York Governor's debate with Cynthia Nixon". ABC News. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  101. ^ Hayward, Steven (July 18, 2017). "JAMIE DIMON FOR PRESIDENT?". Power Line. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  102. ^ Dunkley, Emma (August 3, 2017). "Jamie Dimon could harbour political ambitions". Financial Times. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  103. ^ "CNBC Exclusive: CNBC Transcript: JPMorgan Chase Chairman & CEO Jamie Dimon Speaks with CNBC's Wilfred Frost Today". CNBC. August 8, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  104. ^ Parnes, Amie; Henry, Devin (August 25, 2017). "Franken seen as reluctant 2020 candidate". The Hill. Retrieved August 26, 2017.
  105. ^ Pfeiffer, Alex (November 16, 2017). "Does Al Franken Still Have A Shot In 2020?". The Daily Caller. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  106. ^ Molloy, Tim (November 29, 2016). "Sen. Al Franken Won't Run for President in 2020 (Exclusive)". TheWrap.
  107. ^ Korecki, Natasha (November 29, 2017). "Gutiérrez eyes 2020 presidential run". Politico. Retrieved November 30, 2017.
  108. ^ Preston, Mark (May 10, 2018). "Rep. Gutierrez passes on presidential bid, will focus on mobilizing Latino voters". CNN. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  109. ^ Mindock, Clark (July 20, 2017). "Al Gore's new climate change film raises huge question: Will he run again in 2020?". The Independent. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  110. ^ Allen, Mike (July 20, 2017). "Gore 2020? The hubbub on Al". Axios. Retrieved July 30, 2017.
  111. ^ "Here's why Al Gore is done with politics". NowThis News. August 2, 2017. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  112. ^ "Results of SurveyUSA Election Poll #23742". SurveyUSA. January 10, 2018. Retrieved February 17, 2018.
  113. ^ Saul, Heather (November 16, 2016). "Tom Hanks responds to growing calls for him to run for President in 2020". The Independent. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  114. ^ James, Meg (October 3, 2017). "Disney's Bob Iger criticizes gun violence in wake of Las Vegas shooting". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  115. ^ Bilton, Nick (May 19, 2017). "IGER 2020?". Vanity Fair. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  116. ^ Chuba, Kirsten (April 12, 2018). "Disney CEO Bob Iger Was Considering Presidential Run Before Fox Deal". Variety. Retrieved July 15, 2018.
  117. ^ Rafferty, Scott (December 13, 2017). "Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson Is 'Seriously Considering' Running for President". Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  118. ^ Southern, Keiran (April 11, 2018). "Dwayne Johnson says he may run for US president in 2024 as he rules out 2020". Irish Independent. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  119. ^ Rozsa, Matthew (November 16, 2017). "Tim Kaine wants to eliminate superdelegates". Salon. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  120. ^ Hagen, Lisa (November 17, 2016). "Kaine rules out run for president in 2020". The Hill. Retrieved November 17, 2016.
  121. ^ "Caroline Kennedy's possible political future". AOL. January 23, 2017. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  122. ^ Oppenheimer, Jerry (January 22, 2017). "Could Caroline Kennedy be the baggage-free Hillary Clinton?". New York Post. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  123. ^ Ayer, Tammy. "Caroline Kennedy: None of us can stand on the sidelines". Yakima Herald. When asked if any members of her family plan to run for president in 2020, she said no.
  124. ^ Petit, Stephanie (July 6, 2017). "'A Kennedy Who Could Be President': Rep. Joe Kennedy on Potential 2020 Campaign and Un-Glamorous Hyannis Port Holidays". People. Retrieved August 13, 2017.
  125. ^ Caygle, Heather (September 3, 2017). "The next Kennedy weighs his next move". Politico. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  126. ^ "Joe Kennedy for President? Massachusetts congressman says its 'furthest thing from my mind'". The Republican. July 18, 2017. Retrieved August 13, 2017.
  127. ^ Kay, Stanley (November 1, 2017). "Steve Kerr Would Vote Gregg Popovich for President". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  128. ^ a b Curtis, Charles (March 9, 2018). "Gregg Popovich on running for president with Steve Kerr: We're not 'qualified'". USA Today. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  129. ^ O'Sullivan, Jim (May 2, 2017). "Speculation is stirring about a Seth Moulton presidential bid". The Boston Globe. Retrieved May 2, 2017.
  130. ^ Kruse, Michael (July 28, 2017). "Generals Love Him. Top Democrats Despise Him. Can He Be President Anyway?". Politico. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  131. ^ Hunt, Albert R. (November 2, 2017). "A Democrat Fights His Own Party as Well as Trump". Bloomberg News. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  132. ^ Vigdor, Neil (December 19, 2016). "CT Politics: Draft Murphy group eyes 2020 Trump challenge". Connecticut Post. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  133. ^ Blair, Russell (March 15, 2017). "Trump Presidency Has Filled Chris Murphy's Campaign Coffers". Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  134. ^ Shabad, Rebecca (October 10, 2017). "Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy rules out 2020 presidential bid". CBS News. Retrieved January 5, 2018.
  135. ^ Brodesser-Akner, Claude (July 5, 2018). "Is Phil Murphy already running for president? Experts say take a look at the signs". NJ.com. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  136. ^ Malloy, Daniel (October 30, 2017). "COULD JERSEY'S LIKELY NEXT GOVERNOR BE THE DEMS' GREAT LAST HOPE?". Ozy. Retrieved February 22, 2018.
  137. ^ Boggioni, Tom (March 18, 2017). "'I got a guy': Bill Maher predicts 2020 Democratic presidential candidate if they don't 'f*ck it up'". The Raw Story. Retrieved August 13, 2017.
  138. ^ Wagner, Kurt (November 15, 2016). "Gavin Newsom: 'Being president sounds like the most miserable job in the world'". Recode. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  139. ^ Gabriel Debenedetti (October 25, 2018). "Gavin Newsom Has More Important Things to Do Than Run for President". New York. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  140. ^ Bedard, Paul (October 31, 2017). "2020 poll: Run Michelle Obama Run!". The Washington Examiner. Retrieved January 5, 2018.
  141. ^ Whitney, Mike (December 1, 2017). "Why the Democrats Will Run Michelle Obama in 2020". CounterPunch. Retrieved January 5, 2018.
  142. ^ Earl, Jennifer (November 10, 2016). "Michelle Obama responds to someone asking her to run for president in 2020". CBS News. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  143. ^ Wiedeman, Reeves (April 13, 2018). "Popovich-Kerr 2020: The Stump Speeches". New York. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  144. ^ Herbert, James (November 14, 2017). "Popovich 2020? Political experts analyze Spurs coach as presidential candidate". CBS Sports. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  145. ^ McPike, Erin (January 25, 2017). "Sheryl Sandberg for President?". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  146. ^ Marinucci, Carla (February 1, 2017). "Sheryl Sandberg denies 2020 ambitions, remains 'hopeful' on Trump". Politico. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  147. ^ Levine, Jon (July 24, 2017). "President Scarborough? New Interview Says Joe 'Didn't Rule Out' Interest In White House Run". Mediaite. Retrieved August 21, 2017.
  148. ^ Borchers, Callum (October 3, 2017). "Joe Scarborough isn't running 'for a while,' but here's his gun-control stump speech". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  149. ^ Nuzzi, Olivia (July 23, 2017). "Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski, & Trump: A Love Story". New York. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  150. ^ "Killer Mike Likes Oprah Winfrey, But Picks Ohio Politician for President". TMZ. January 12, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  151. ^ Post, Chantilly (January 12, 2018). "Killer Mike Thinks Nina Turner Should Run For President, Not Oprah". HotNewHipHop. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  152. ^ "Nina Turner's rising profile in national politics doesn't make her a shoo-in for Cleveland mayor: Brent Larkin". Cleveland.com.
  153. ^ "An Interview With Nina Turner". Jacobin Magazine.
  154. ^ Hickey, Jennifer (July 20, 2017). "Maxine Waters' New Hampshire cameo spurs 2020 questions". Fox News. Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  155. ^ Picket, Kerry (July 20, 2017). "Maxine Waters: I'll Run For President If Millennials Want Me To". The Daily Caller. Retrieved July 21, 2017.
  156. ^ Estepa, Jessica (August 4, 2017). "Rep. Maxine Waters says she isn't running for president". USA Today. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  157. ^ Oppenheim, Maya (March 3, 2017). "Oprah Winfrey considers 2020 Presidential run in wake of Donald Trump's win". The Independent. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  158. ^ Marie Segarra, Lisa (January 25, 2018). "Sorry, Oprah Fans. She's Not Running for President in 2020". Time. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  159. ^ "Oprah Winfrey: I don't want to run for US president". BBC. November 1, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  160. ^ Lafrance, Adrienne (January 19, 2017). "Zuckerberg 2020?". The Atlantic. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  161. ^ Carberry, Maegan (March 12, 2017). "We picked the wrong billionaire: The case for Mark Zuckerberg 2020". Salon. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  162. ^ Kantrowitz, Alex; Tiku, Nitasha (January 24, 2017). "Mark Zuckerberg says he's not running for president". CNBC. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  163. ^ "Exclusive: Democrats, anticipating heated primary, set earlier 2020 convention date". CNN. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
  164. ^ "Houston moves forward with DNC 2020 bid". KHOU. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  165. ^ "Cruise ship hotels, zoo parties and an NBA arena: Miami's Democratic convention pitch". miamiherald. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  166. ^ Glauber, Bill; Nelson, James B.; Daykin, Tom (February 21, 2018). "Milwaukee leaders announce bid for 2020 Democratic National Convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  167. ^ "City of Milwaukee 1 of 3 finalists to host 2020 Democratic National Convention". FOX6Now.com. 2018-06-20. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  168. ^ Trone, David [@davidjtrone] (July 28, 2017). ".@JohnKDelaney has done a great job bringing people together to solve problems. He would be a fantastic President, and I'm behind him 100%!" (Tweet). Retrieved July 29, 2017 – via Twitter.
  169. ^ García Martínez, Antonio [@antoniogm] (February 10, 2018). "'In just a few years, he said, "we're going to have a million truck drivers out of work..." "That one innovation," he continued, "will be enough to create riots in the street." Finally, someone in politics realizes what's up. Go @AndrewYangVFA" (Tweet). Retrieved February 15, 2018 – via Twitter.
  170. ^ Rose, David S. [@davidsrose] (February 10, 2018). "I've got my candidate for President in 2020. He's brilliant, entrepreneurial, accomplished, far-sighted, and—most important—of impeccable integrity. @andrewyang2020" (Tweet). Retrieved February 24, 2018 – via Twitter.
  171. ^ "Andrew Yang on Twitter". Twitter.
  172. ^ "Andrew Yang on Twitter". Twitter.