Democratic recession

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Democratic recession refers to the decline of liberal democracy or the strength of democratic institutions in countries that formerly had a higher level of freedom and democracy. The term, coined by political scientist Larry Diamond, is analogous to economic recession which refers to a decline in the economy. Scholars currently debate whether a global democratic recession is ongoing as of 2020, however Freedom House rankings have consistently declined since 2005.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14] Democratic recession is contrasted with the case where hybrid regimes or authoritarian regimes become even more autocratic.[15] In 2020, Diamond said that COVID-19 was accelerating the democratic recession.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diamond, Larry (2 May 2014). "Democracy's Deepening Recession". The Atlantic. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  2. ^ "Democratic recession and transitional justice". www.justiceinfo.net.
  3. ^ "Terrorism and Democratic Recession | The University of Chicago Law Review". lawreview.uchicago.edu.
  4. ^ Diamond, Larry (28 January 2009). "The Democratic Rollback". ISSN 0015-7120. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. ^ Diamond, Larry; Plattner, Marc F. (2015). Democracy in Decline?. JHU Press. ISBN 978-1-4214-1818-6.
  6. ^ Jones, Torrey Taussig and Bruce (22 March 2018). "Democracy in the new geopolitics". Brookings. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  7. ^ Levitsky, Steven; Way, Lucan (2015). "The Myth of Democratic Recession". Journal of Democracy. 26 (1): 45–58. doi:10.1353/jod.2015.0007.
  8. ^ "Democracy continues its disturbing retreat". The Economist. 31 January 2018. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  9. ^ "Capitalism and democracy — the odd couple". www.ft.com. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  10. ^ "The global democratic recession". Financial Times. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  11. ^ "Democracy in Crisis: Freedom House Releases Freedom in the World 2018". Freedom House. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  12. ^ Jacobs, Kristof. "Economic recession, democratic recession? An event history analysis". Paper presented at ECPR Joint Sessions 2014 (Salamanca).
  13. ^ Merloe, Pat (9 March 2015). "Facing "Democratic Recession" Requires Democratic Resolve". DemocracyWorks: A Blog of the National Democratic Institute. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  14. ^ Diamond, Larry (2015). "Facing Up to the Democratic Recession". Journal of Democracy. 26 (1): 141–155. doi:10.1353/jod.2015.0009.
  15. ^ Lührmann, Anna; Lindberg, Staffan I. (2019). "A third wave of autocratization is here: what is new about it?". Democratization. 26 (7): 1095–1113. doi:10.1080/13510347.2019.1582029.
  16. ^ "COVID-19 accelerating 'democratic recession,' warns Larry Diamond". The Stanford Daily. 1 May 2020. Retrieved 29 July 2020.