Demographics of Alaska

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Alaska Population Density Map
Historical population
Census Pop.
188033,426
189032,052−4.1%
190063,59298.4%
191064,3561.2%
192055,036−14.5%
193059,2787.7%
194072,52422.3%
1950128,64377.4%
1960226,16775.8%
1970300,38232.8%
1980401,85133.8%
1990550,04336.9%
2000626,93214.0%
2010710,23113.3%
2020733,3913.3%
1930 and 1940 censuses taken in preceding autumn
Sources: 1910–2020[1]
Map of the largest racial/ethnic group by borough. Red indicates Native American, blue indicates non-Hispanic white, and green indicates Asian. Darker shades indicate a higher proportion of the population.

As of 2019, Alaska has an estimated population of 731,545.[2]

In 2005, the population of Alaska was 663,661, which is an increase of 5,906, or 0.9%, from the prior year and an increase of 36,730, or 5.9%, since the year 2000.[3] This includes a natural increase since the last census of 36,590 people (53,132 births minus 16,542 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 1,181 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 5,800 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 4,619 people. More than half of the state's population lives in Anchorage, Juneau and Fairbanks, with two-fifths in Anchorage alone. The Matanuska-Susistna Borough is one of the nation’s fastest growing areas, with an estimated population of 100,000 and projections of 130,000 by 2027.[4] The last census of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in 2019 showed a population of 108,317.[5] The Matanuska-Susitna Borough contains the incorporated townships of Wasilla and Palmer and is home to an indigenous population, The Dena'ina people have been in the area for 10,000 years. Knik Tribal Council is a federally recognized tribe in the MAT-SU and a non-profit social service organization for Natives in the MAT-SU region.[6] This area contains the cities of Meadow Lakes, Big Lake, Houston, Talkeetna, Willow. There are 54 cities, townships and other populated areas in the Matanuska-Susistna Borough.[7]

With a population of 710,231, according to the 2010 U.S. census,[8] Alaska is the 48th most populous and least densely populated state.

For purposes of the federal census, the state is divided into artificial divisions defined geographically by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only.

The center of population of Alaska is located approximately 64.37 kilometers (40.00 mi) east of Anchorage at 61.399882 N. latitude, -148.873973 W. longitude.[9] In 2006, Alaska had a larger percentage of tobacco smokers than the national average, with 24% of Alaskan adults smoking.[10]

History[edit]

The 1870 Census in Alaska was conducted by U.S. Army personnel under the command of Major General Henry W. Halleck. This count showed 82,400 people. But because of duplication of tribes listed under different names, the inclusion of a tribe that did not exist, and exaggerated estimates, the number was not considered reliable.[11]

Ancestry[edit]

According to the 2010 United States census, the racial composition of Alaska was the following:[12]

The population was 5.5% of Hispanic or Latino origin (of any race) and 94.5% of Non-Hispanic and Latino origin (of any race).

The largest ancestry groups (which the Census defines as not including racial terms) in the state are:[13]

The vast and sparsely populated regions of northern and western Alaska are primarily inhabited by Alaska Natives, who are also numerous in the southeast. Anchorage, Fairbanks, and other parts of south-central and southeast Alaska have many White Americans of northern and western European ancestry. The Wrangell-Petersburg area has many residents of Scandinavian ancestry and the Aleutian Islands contain a large Filipino population. The vast majority of the state's African American population lives in Anchorage and Fairbanks. Also, Alaska has the largest percentage of American Indians of any state. Some of the Alaska Natives absorbed the small 1700s Russian-era settlement. There are some Creole people of natives and Russians mixture.

Demographics of Alaska (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 75.43% 4.46% 19.06% 5.24% 0.88%
2000 (Hispanic only) 3.42% 0.33% 0.45% 0.16% 0.06%
2005 (total population) 74.71% 4.72% 18.77% 5.90% 0.88%
2005 (Hispanic only) 4.32% 0.38% 0.48% 0.19% 0.05%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 4.85% 12.03% 4.27% 19.23% 5.35%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 3.49% 11.30% 4.02% 18.96% 5.86%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 33.56% 21.02% 14.52% 27.89% -1.95%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

Birth data[edit]

Note: Births in table don't add up, because Hispanics are counted both by their ethnicity and by their race, giving a higher overall number.

Live Births by Single Race/Ethnicity of Mother
Race 2013[14] 2014[15] 2015[16] 2016[17] 2017[18] 2018[19] 2019[20] 2020[21]
White: 7,407 (64.7%) 7,288 (64.0%) 7,244 (64.2%) ... ... ... ... ...
> Non-Hispanic White 6,622 (57.8%) 6,541 (57.4%) 6,543 (58.0%) 5,787 (51.6%) 5,259 (50.3%) 5,057 (50.1%) 4,859 (49.5%) 4,770 (50.4%)
American Indian 2,462 (21.5%) 2,450 (21.5%) 2,415 (21.4%) 2,110 (18.8%) 1,903 (18.2%) 1,873 (18.6%) 1,885 (19.2%) 1,797 (19.0%)
Asian 1,053 (9.2%) 1,106 (9.7%) 1,114 (9.9%) 691 (6.2%) 686 (6.6%) 641 (6.4%) 581 (5.9%) 524 (5.5%)
Pacific Islander ... ... ... 289 (2.6%) 308 (2.9%) 299 (3.0%) 302 (3.1%) 325 (3.4%)
Black 524 (4.6%) 548 (4.8%) 509 (4.5%) 319 (2.8%) 329 (3.1%) 280 (2.8%) 290 (3.0%) 281 (3.0%)
Hispanic (of any race) 848 (7.4%) 841 (7.4%) 810 (7.2%) 811 (7.2%) 799 (7.6%) 807 (8.0%) 787 (8.0%) 734 (7.8%)
Total Alaska 11,446 (100%) 11,392 (100%) 11,282 (100%) 11,209 (100%) 10,445 (100%) 10,086 (100%) 9,822 (100%) 9,469 (100%)
  • Since 2016, data for births of White Hispanic origin are not collected, but included in one Hispanic group; persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

Languages[edit]

According to the 2005-2007 American Community Survey, 84.7% of people over the age of five speak only English at home. About 3.5% speak Spanish at home. About 2.2% speak an Indo-European language other than Spanish or English at home, about 4.3% speak an Asian language at home and about 5.3% speak other languages at home.

A total of 5.2% of Alaskans speak one of the state's 22 indigenous languages, known locally as "native languages". These languages belong to two major language families: Eskimo–Aleut and Na-Dené. As the homeland of these two major language families of North America, Alaska has been described as the crossroads of the continent, providing evidence for the recent settlement of North America via the Bering land bridge.

Religion[edit]

Religion in Alaska (2014)[23]

  Protestant Christian (37%)
  Roman Catholic (16%)
  Orthodox (5%)
  Latter-day Saint (5%)
  Other Christian (0.5%)
  Jehovah's Witnesses (0.5%)
  Other (37%)
  Don't know/refused answer (1%)
Russian Orthodox church in Sitka, Alaska.

Other religions[24]

Alaska's relatively large Orthodox Christian population is notable. The large Eastern Orthodox population (with 49 parishes and up to 50,000 followers) stems from early Russian colonization of the Americas (which centered on Alaska), and from missionary work among Alaska Natives. In 1795 the first Russian Orthodox church was built[by whom?] in Kodiak. Intermarriage with Alaskan Natives helped Russian immigrants integrate into Alaskan societies. As a result, a number of Russian Orthodox parishes gradually became established in Alaska. As of 2021 many are affiliated with the Orthodox Church in America, while others are members of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia.

The first Sitka Lutheran Church was built for Finnish people in New Archangel (present-day Sitka) in 1843.

Alaska has the largest Quaker population (by percentage) of any U.S. state.[26]

As of 1994, 3,060 Jews lived in Alaska.[27] The number of Jehovah's Witnesses stands at a little less than 2,400. Estimates for the number of Alaskan Muslims range from 1,000 to 5,000.[28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Historical Population Change Data (1910–2020)". Census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Archived April 29, 2021, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Alaska Population 2017 World Population Review
  3. ^ "Graphical Library of Demographic Change in Arctic Alaska". Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  4. ^ "Matanuska Susitna Borough/Business/A Haven for Commercial and Industrial Development and Small Business". Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  5. ^ "QuickFacts Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska". Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  6. ^ "Borough respects Knik Tribal Council's wishes". Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  7. ^ "Matanuska-Susitna Borough AK Cities, Towns, & Neighborhoods". Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  8. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. (2001-04-02). "Census 2000 PHC-T-2. Ranking Tables for States: 1990 and 2000. Table 1. States Ranked by Population: 2000." U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  9. ^ Population and Population Centers by State: 2010. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 5, 2017.
  10. ^ CDC's STATE System - State Comparison Report Cigarette Use (Adults) – BRFSS[permanent dead link] for 2006, lists Alaska as having 24.2% smokers. The national average is 20.8% according to Cigarette Smoking Among Adults-United States, 2006 article in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
  11. ^ "Getting to Hard-to-Reach Villages Before Spring Thaw and Start of Hunting Season".
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-05. Retrieved 2012-02-25.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder2.census.gov. Archived from the original on 12 February 2020. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  14. ^ "National Vital Statistics Reports, Volume 64, Number 1" (PDF). cdc.gov. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  15. ^ "National Vital Statistics Reports, Volume 64, Number 12" (PDF). cdc.gov. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  16. ^ "National Vital Statistics Reports, Volume 66, Number 1" (PDF). cdc.gov. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  17. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_01.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  18. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  19. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2019-12-02.
  20. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2019-12-02.
  21. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2022-02-20.
  22. ^ Coast Tsimshian is not technically indigenous to Alaska, the Coast Tsimshian people having moved north from British Columbia in the historic period. Nevertheless it is usually grouped with the other Native languages.
  23. ^ "Adults in Alaska". Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project. May 11, 2015.
  24. ^ "Survey Finds Alaskans Less Religious Than Other Americans". pewforum.org. 4 September 2008. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  25. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). www.census.gov. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 January 2011. Retrieved 14 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  26. ^ Samuel, Bill (9 April 2004) [1999]. "Distribution of Quakers in the U.S." QuakerInfo.com. Retrieved 14 April 2021. [...] Alaska [...] has far and away the largest percentage of Friends in its population, despite relatively low absolute numbers [...]
  27. ^ "j. – Alaskan Jews trying to connect, says study". jewishsf.com. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  28. ^ Alaskan Muslims Avoid Conflict Archived January 13, 2009, at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]