Demographics of Florida

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Historical population
Census Pop.
183034,730
184054,47756.9%
185087,44560.5%
1860140,42460.6%
1870187,74833.7%
1880269,49343.5%
1890391,42245.2%
1900528,54235.0%
1910752,61942.4%
1920968,47028.7%
19301,468,21151.6%
19401,897,41429.2%
19502,771,30546.1%
19604,951,56078.7%
19706,789,44337.1%
19809,746,32443.6%
199012,937,92632.7%
200015,982,37823.5%
201018,801,31017.6%
202021,538,18714.6%
Sources: 1910–2020[1]

Florida is the third-most populous state in the United States. Its residents include people from a wide variety of ethnic, racial, national and religious backgrounds. The state has attracted immigrants, particularly from Latin America.[2] Florida's majority ethnic group are European Americans, with approximately 65% of the population identifying as White. National ethnic communities in the state include Cubans, who migrated en masse following the revolution in mid-century. They have been joined by other immigrants from Latin America, and Spanish is spoken by more than 20% of the state's population, with high usage especially in the Miami-Dade County area.

Population[edit]

With a population of 21.5 million according to the 2020 census, Florida is the most populous state in the Southeastern United States, and the second-most populous state in the South behind Texas. Within the United States, it contains the highest percentage of people over 65 (17.3%), and the 8th fewest people under 18 (21.9%).[3]

Population Density per square mile of each Florida Census Tract as of the 2020 United States Census
Florida ancestry map
Florida's metropolitan areas and major cities.

Net domestic migration[edit]

Year[4] In-migrants Out-migrants Net migration
2010 482,889 427,853 55,036
2011 498,597 437,202 61,395
2012 537,148 428,325 108,823
2013 529,406 423,995 105,411
2014 546,501 437,516 108,985
2015 584,938 445,320 139,618
2016 605,018 433,452 171,566
2017 566,476 447,586 118,890
2018 587,261 470,977 116,284

Race/Ethnicity[edit]

2020 census[edit]

According to the 2020 census, the racial distributions are as follows; 51.5% Non-Hispanic White, 26.6% of the population are Hispanics or Latino (of any race), 14.5% African American, 4% Native American, and 2.3% Asian, Oriental and other.

2010 census[edit]

According to the 2010 census, the racial distributions are as follows; 53.5% Non-Hispanic White, 25.6% of the population are Hispanic Americans or Latino (of any race), 15.2% African American (includes Afro-Caribbeans), 4.5% Native American, 2.0% Asian, Orientals and others Florida has one of the largest African-American populations in the country, and has the second-highest Latino population on the East Coast outside of New York state. Its ethnic Asian and Oriental population has grown rapidly since the late 1990s; the majority are South Asians, Filipinos, Vietnamese, ethnic Chinese. The state has some federally recognized Native American tribes, such as the Seminoles in the southeastern part of the state.[5]

2018 American Community Survey[edit]

Florida racial and ethnic map as of 2019
  Black 50–60%

  Hispanic 50–60%

  Hispanic 60–70%

  Non-Hispanic White 30–40%

  Non-Hispanic White 40–50%

  Non-Hispanic White 50–60%

  Non-Hispanic White 60–70%

  Non-Hispanic White 70–80%

  Non-Hispanic White 80–90%
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Racial Makeup of Florida (2018)[6]

  White alone (74.65%)
  Black alone (16.01%)
  Native American alone (4.28%)
  Some other race alone (0.00%)
  Two or more races (2.88%)
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Racial/Ethnic Makeup of Florida excluding Hispanics from Racial Categories (2018)[6]
NH=Non-Hispanic

  White NH (53.26%)
  Black NH (15.27%)
  Native American NH (0.19%)
  Pacific Islander NH (0.05%)
  Other race NH (0.38%)
  Two or more races NH (2.00%)
  Hispanic Any Race (26.12%)
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Racial Makeup of Hispanics in Florida (2018)[6]

  White alone (81.89%)
  Black alone (2.84%)
  Native American alone (4.33%)
  Pacific Islander alone (0.06%)
  Two or more races (3.36%)

According to the 2018 US Census Bureau estimates, Florida's population was 74.7% White (53.3% Non-Hispanic White), 16.0% Black or African American, 4.3% Native American and Alaskan Native, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.3% Some Other Race, and 2.9% from two or more races.[6] The White population continues to remain the largest racial category as Hispanics in Florida primarily identify as White as well as Native Indigenous American with others identifying as Some Other Race (4.3%), Multiracial (3.4%), Black (2.8%),and Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (0.1%).[6] By ethnicity, 26.1% of the total population is Hispanic-Latino (of any race) and 71.9% is Non-Hispanic (of any race). If treated as a separate category, Hispanics are the largest minority group in Florida.[6]


Birth data[edit]

Note: Births in the table exceed 100% because some Hispanics are counted both by their ethnicity and by their race, giving a higher overall number.

Live Births by Single Race/Ethnicity of Mother
Race 2013[7] 2014[8] 2015[9] 2016[10] 2017[11] 2018[12] 2019[13] 2020[14] 2021[15]
White: 154,791 (71.8%) 159,035 (72.3%) 162,594 (72.5%) 157,006 (69.8%) 154,504 (69.1%) 157,945 (71.3%) 156,463 (71.1%) 148,661 (70.9%)
> non-Hispanic White 98,586 (45.7%) 100,837 (45.8%) 102,549 (45.7%) 99,344 (44.1%) 96,280 (43.1%) 95,868 (43.2%) 93,590 (42.5%) 88,080 (42.0%)
Hispanic (of any race) 59,206 (27.5%) 61,849 (28.1%) 64,078 (28.6%) 65,895 (29.3%) 67,049 (30.0%) 67,201 (30.3%) 68,234 (31.0%) 66,156 (31.6%)
Black 52,959 (24.6%) 53,148 (24.1%) 53,699 (23.9%) 48,928 (21.7%) 49,428 (22.1%) 48,174 (21.7%) 47,730 (21.7%) 45,585 (21.7%)
American Indian 392 (0.2%) 406 (0.2%) 373 (0.2%) 237 (0.1%) 429 (0.2%) 413 (0.2%) 400 (0.2%) 229 (0.1%)
Asian 7,265 (3.4%) 7,402 (3.4%) 7,603 (3.4%) 7,178 (3.2%) 7,015 (3.1%) 6,996 (3.2%) 7,069 (3.2%) 6,539 (3.1%)
Total 215,407 (100%) 219,991 (100%) 224,269 (100%) 225,022 (100%) 223,630 (100%) 221,542 (100%) 220,002 (100%) 209,671 (100%) 216,499 (100%)

Languages[edit]

Top Languages in Florida
Language Percent of
population
(2010)[16]
English 73.36%
Spanish 19.54%
French Creole (including Haitian and Antillean Creoles) 1.84%
French 0.60%
Portuguese 0.50%
German 0.42%
Tagalog,
Vietnamese,
Italian (tied)
0.31%
Arabic 0.22%
Chinese 0.20%
Russian 0.18%
Polish 0.14%

As of 2010, 73.36% of Florida residents age 5 and older spoke English at home as a primary language, while 19.54% spoke Spanish, 1.84% French Creole (mostly Haitian Creole), 0.60% French and 0.50% Portuguese. In total, 26.64% of Florida's population age 5 and older spoke a mother language other than English.[16]

Florida's public education system identified more than 200 first languages other than English spoken in the homes of students.[17] In 1990, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) settled a class action lawsuit against the state Florida Department of Education with a consent decree that required educators to be trained in teaching English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).[18]

Article II, Section 9, of the Florida Constitution provides that "English is the official language of the State of Florida." This provision was adopted in 1988 by a vote following an Initiative Petition.

A Miami accent has developed among persons born and/or raised in and around Miami-Dade County and a few other parts of South Florida.[19] It is more prominent among Hispanics (especially Cuban Americans and other Latino groups, influenced by the Spanish language).[20][21]

Religion[edit]

Religion in Florida (2014)[22]

  Protestantism (46%)
  Mormonism (1%)
  Other Christian (1%)
  No religion (24%)
  Judaism (3%)
  Other religion (3%)

Florida residents identify as mostly of various Protestant groups. Roman Catholics make up the single largest denomination in the state. Florida residents' current religious affiliations are shown in the table below:[22]

Veterans[edit]

There were 1.6 million veterans in Florida in 2010, representing 8% of the total population.[23]

Migration[edit]

In 2013, most net migrants come from 1) New York, 2) New Jersey, 3) Pennsylvania, and 4) the Midwestern United States; emigration is higher from these same states. For example, about 50,000 moved to New York; but more than 50,000 people moved from New York to Florida.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Historical Population Change Data (1910–2020)". Census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Archived April 29, 2021, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "State Population Facts - Florida". npg.org. Archived from the original on March 30, 2008. Retrieved April 2, 2008.
  3. ^ Michael B. Sauter; Douglas A. McIntyre (May 10, 2011). "The States With The Oldest And Youngest Residents". wallst.com.
  4. ^ "State-to-State Migration Flows".
  5. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Florida". Census Bureau QuickFacts. December 21, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "B03002 HISPANIC OR LATINO ORIGIN BY RACE - Florida - 2018 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. July 1, 2018. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  7. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  8. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_12.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  9. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  10. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_01.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  11. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  12. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  13. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved March 27, 2021.
  14. ^ "Natality, 2016-2020 expanded Results Data current as of 2020". Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  15. ^ "RECORDED LIVE BIRTHS BY MONTH, BY COUNTY, FLORIDA, 2021 PROVISIONAL DATA AS OF 01/24/2022". Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  16. ^ a b "Florida". Modern Language Association. Retrieved August 15, 2013.
  17. ^ MacDonald, Victoria M. (April 2004). "The Status of English Language Learners in Florida: Trends and Prospects" (PDF). Education Policy Research Unit, Arizona State University. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 9, 2014. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  18. ^ "League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) et al. vs. State Board of Education et al. Consent Decree". United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. August 14, 1990. Archived from the original on June 17, 2013. Retrieved May 24, 2013.
  19. ^ "'Miami Accent' Takes Speakers By Surprise". Articles - Sun-Sentinel.com. June 13, 2004. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  20. ^ "Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not". WLRN-TV and WLRN-FM. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  21. ^ "Miami Accents: How 'Miamah' Turned Into A Different Sort Of Twang". WLRN-TV & WLRN-FM. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  22. ^ a b "Adults in Florida". Pew Research Center.
  23. ^ "What each state's veteran population looks like, in 10 maps". The Washington Post. November 11, 2014. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  24. ^ Fishkind, Hank (March 15, 2014). "Harsh winters make Florida attractive for visitors, moves". Florida Today. Melbourne, Florida. pp. 4A. Retrieved March 28, 2014.