Demographics of Nova Scotia

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Canada Nova Scotia Density 2016

Nova Scotia (Latin for New Scotland; French: Nouvelle-Écosse; Scottish Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is a Canadian province located on Canada's southeastern coast. It is the most populous province in the Atlantic Canada, and its capital, Halifax, is a major economic centre of the region. Nova Scotia is the second smallest province in Canada, with an area of 55,284 km². As of 2016, it has a population of 923,598 [1] making it the second most densely populated province of the country.[2]

Population history[edit]

Year Population % change Rank*
5-year 10-year
1827 123,630 n/a
1837 199,906 62.0
1851 276,854
1861 330,857 19.5
1871 387,800 17.2 3
1881 440,572 13.6
1891 450,396 2.2
1901 459,574 2.0
1911 492,338 7.1 4
1921 523,837 6.4 7
1931 512,846 - 2.1
1941 577,962 12.7
1951 642,584 11.2
1956 694,717 8.1
1961 737,007 6.1 14.7
1966 756,039 2.6 8.8
1971 788,965 4.4 7.0
1976 828,570 5.0 9.6
1981 847,442 2.3 7.4
1986 873,175 3.0 5.4
1991 899,942 3.1 6.2
1996 909,282 1.0 4.1
2001 908,007 - 0.1 0.9
2006 913,462 0.6 2.8
2011 921,727 0.9 1.5
2016 923,5983.2 4.0

Source:[3] Statistics Canada [4][5]
* among provinces.
** Preliminary 2006 census estimate.

Population geography[edit]

Nova Scotia is the seventh most populous province in Canada with an estimated 965,382 residents in 2019.[6] It accounts for less than 3 percent of the population of Canada while the population density is approximately 17.4 per square kilometre.[7] Furthermore, 60% of the population live in rural parts of the province.

Regional municipalities[edit]

Nova Scotia has three regional municipalities.

Name Population
(2016)[8]
Population
(2011)[8]
Change
(%)[8]
Area
(km²)[8]
Population
density[8]
Cape Breton 94,285 97,398 −3.2 2,430.06 38.8
Halifax 403,131 390,096 3.3 5,490.35 73.4
Queens 10,307 10,917 −5.6 2,392.63 4.3
Total regional municipalities 507,723 498,411 1.0 10,313.04 49.2

Towns[edit]

Nova Scotia has 26 towns, not including the former Town of Canso that dissolved to become part of Guysborough County on July 1, 2012 and the former Towns of Bridgetown and Springhill which dissolved on April 1, 2015.[9]

Population centres[edit]

The Halifax population centre is the largest urban area in Nova Scotia. Statistics Canada recognizes a total of 37 population centres in the province.[10]

Population centres of Nova Scotia
Rank Population centre[11] Size group[11] Population (2016)[11] Population (2011)[11] % Change[11]
1 Halifax Large urban 316,701 304,979 +3.8%
2 Cape Breton - Sydney Small 29,904 30,175 -0.9%
3 Truro Small 22,954 22,470 +2.2%
4 New Glasgow Small 18,665 19,623 -4.9%
5 Glace Bay Small 17,556 18,475 -5.0%
6 Sydney Mines Small 12,823 12,964 -1.1%
7 Kentville Small 12,088 12,124 -0.3%
8 Amherst Small 9,550 9,868 -3.2%
9 Bridgewater Small 8,532 8,241 +3.5%
10 New Waterford Small 7,344 7,322 +0.3%
11 Yarmouth Small 7,217 7,367 -2.0%
12 Kingston - Greenwood Small 6,879 6,840 +0.6%
13 Enfield - Lantz Small 6,807 5,941 +14.6%
14 Windsor Small 5,248 5,013 +4.7%
15 Antigonish Small 5,002 5,049 -0.9%
16 Wolfville Small 4,195 4,269 -1.7%
17 Port Hawkesbury Small 3,004 3,167 -5.1%
18 Springhill Small 2,743 2,978 -7.9%
19 Pictou Small 2,711 2,909 -6.8%
20 Liverpool Small 2,549 2,624 -2.9%
21 Lake Echo Small 2,515 2,682 -6.2%
22 Berwick Small 2,449 2,368 +3.4%
23 Eskasoni 3 Small 2,120 1,940 +9.3%
24 Lunenburg Small 2,085 2,126 -1.9%
25 Digby Small 2,060 2,152 -4.3%
26 Howie Centre Small 1,733 1,783 -4.3%
27 Still Water Lake Small 1,586 1,682 -5.7%
28 Hantsport Small 1,560 1,565 -0.3%
29 Chester Small 1,458 1,484 -1.8%
30 Brookside Small 1,441 1,531 -5.9%
31 Middleton Small 1,391 1,390 +0.1%
32 Shelburne Small 1,330 1,228 +8.3%
33 Inverness Small 1,248 1,221 +2.2%
34 English Corner Small 1,151 1,095 5.1%
35 Centreville Small 1,129 1,073 -4.3%
36 Hayes Subdivision Small 1,121 1,090 +2.8%
38 Port Williams Small 1,120 962 -4.3%

Ethnic origin[edit]

Note: the percentages do not necessarily add up to 100% as multiple responses are allowed. Ethnic origins with less than 2% of the responses are not listed.[12]

Ethnic origin (Canada 2016 Census)
Population group Population % of total population
Canadian 387,360 42.6%
Scottish 272,880 30.0%
English 262,375 28.9%
Irish 195,865 21.6%
French 149,625 16.5%
German 97,555 10.7%
First Nations (North American Indian) 48,640 5.4%
Dutch (Netherlands) 32,045 3.5%
Métis 26,025 2.9%
Acadian 23,700 2.6%

Visible minorities and Aboriginals[edit]

Visible minority and Aboriginal population (Canada 2016 Census)
Population group Population % of total population
European 798,195 87.9%
Visible minority group
Source:[13]
South Asian 7,910 0.9%
Chinese 8,640 1%
Black 21,915 2.4%
Latin American 1,685 0.2%
Filipino 3,400 0.4%
Arab 8,110 0.9%
Southeast Asian 1,195 0.1%
West Asian 1,540 0.2%
Korean 1,540 0.2%
Japanese 695 0.1%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 630 0.1%
Multiple visible minority 1,385 0.2%
Total visible minority population 58,650 6.5%
Aboriginal group
Source:[14]
First Nations 25,830 2.8%
Métis 23,315 2.6%
Inuit 795 0.1%
Multiple Aboriginal identity 835 0.1%
Aboriginal, n.i.e. 725 0.1%
Total Aboriginal population 51,495 5.7%
Total population 908,340 100%

Languages[edit]

Knowledge of languages[edit]

Knowledge of official languages of Canada in Nova Scotia
Language Percent
English only
89.17%
French only
0.08%
English and French
10.45%
Neither English nor French
0.30%

The question on knowledge of languages allows for multiple responses. The following figures are from the 2016 Canadian Census, and lists languages that were selected by at least one per cent of respondents.

Language Responses %
English 905,020 99.63
French 95,740 10.54
Arabic 9,685 1.07

Mother tongue[edit]

Mother tongue in Nova Scotia: Red – majority anglophone, Orange – mixed, Blue – majority francophone.

The 2011 Canadian census showed a population of 921,727.
Of the 904,285 singular responses to the census question concerning mother tongue the most commonly reported languages were:

Ranking Language Population Percentage
1. English 836,085 92.46%
2. French 31,105 3.44%
3. Arabic 5,965 0.66%
4. Algonquian languages 4,685 0.52%
Mi'kmaq 4,620 0.51%
5. German 3,275 0.36%
6. Chinese 2,750 0.30%
Mandarin 905 0.10%
Cantonese 590 0.06%
7. Dutch 1,725 0.19%
8. Spanish 1,545 0.17%
9. Canadian Gaelic 1275 0.14%
=10. Tagalog Language 1.185 0.13%
=10. Persian 1,185 0.13%
11. Polish 825 0.09%
=12. Korean 815 0.09%
=12. Russian 815 0.09%
14. Italian 790 0.09%
15. Greek 775 0.08%
16. Scandinavian languages 595 0.06%
Danish 175 0.02%
Norwegian 125 0.02%
Icelandic 120 0.01%
Swedish 85 0.01%
17. Urdu 540 0.06%
18. Serbo-Croatian languages 520 0.06%
Croatian 210 0.02%
Serbo-Croatian 105 0.01%
Bosnian 90 0.01%
Serbian 115 0.01%
19. Hindi 515 0.06%
20. Vietnamese 450 0.05%
21. Portuguese 380 0.04%
22. Bengali 375 0.04%
23. Panjabi 370 0.04%
24. Celtic languages 330 0.04%
25. Japanese 305 0.03%
26. Ukrainian 300 0.03%
27. Hungarian 280 0.03%
28. Czech 180 0.02%
29. Romanian 170 0.02%
30. Gujarati 105 0.01%

There were also 275 single-language responses for Turkish; 195 for Non-verbal languages (Sign languages); 30 for Malay; 100 for Bantu languages; 70 for Kurdish; 120 for Slovak; and 5 for Estonian. Figures shown are for the number of single language responses and the percentage of total single-language responses.[15]

Religion[edit]

Majority religion in Nova Scotia by county
Religion (2011)[16]
Religion Population Pct (%)
Catholic 298,270 32.92%
No religious affiliation 197,665 21.81%
United Church 109,700 12.10%
Anglican 100,120 11.05%
Baptist 80,815 8.92%
Other Christian 55,555 6.13%
Presbyterian 23,555 2.60%
Pentecostal 9,595 1.06%
Lutheran 9,485 1.05%
Muslim 8,505 0.94%
Christian Orthodox 3,370 0.37%
Other religions 2,720 0.30%
Buddhist 2,205 0.24%
Hindu 1,850 0.20%
Jewish 1,805 0.20%
Traditional (Aboriginal) Spirituality 570 0.06%
Sikh 390 0.04%

Migration[edit]

Immigration[edit]

The 2016 Canadian census counted a total of 55,675 immigrants living in Nova Scotia.
The most commonly reported origins for these immigrants were: [17]

Country Immigrants
1. United Kingdom 11,275
2. United States 7,375
3. China 2,850
4. Germany 2,600
5. Philippines 2,570
6. India 2,225
7. Netherlands 1,645
8. Lebanon 1,370
9. Syria 1,150
10. Iran 970
11. South Korea 870
12. Egypt 770
13. Poland 630
14. Pakistan 615
15. France 610
16. Russian Federation 585
17. Italy 525
18. Iraq 525
19. Greece 505
20. Jamaica 480

There were also 475 immigrants from the Republic of Ireland; 460 from South Africa; 450 from Vietnam; 350 from Nigeria; 335 from Ukraine; 325 from Mexico; 315 from Bangladesh; 310 from Sri Lanka; 280 from Hong Kong; 225 from Japan; 225 from Taiwan; 220 from Trinidad and Tobago; 220 from Portugal; and 210 from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Recent immigration[edit]

The 2016 Canadian census counted a total of 11,785 recent immigrants living in Nova Scotia, defined as "an immigrant who first obtained his or her landed immigrant or permanent resident status between January 1, 2011 and May 10, 2016."[18]
The most commonly reported origins for these recent immigrants were:

Country Immigrants
1. Philippines 1,500
2. United Kingdom 1,080
3. China 985
4. India 900
5. Syria 890
6. United States 615
7. Israel 290
8. Iran 260
9. Iraq 245
10. South Korea 225
11. Germany 215
12. Egypt 205
13. Nigeria 200
14. Jamaica 195
15. Nepal 185
16. Russian Federation 180
17. Pakistan 145
18. Ukraine 140
19. Saudi Arabia 125
20. France 110

There were also 105 recent immigrants from Mexico; 100 from Sri Lanka; 100 from Turkey; 95 from Brazil; 80 from South Africa; 80 from Bangladesh; 75 from the Republic of Ireland; 75 from Lebanon; 70 from Cuba; 70 from Eritrea; 70 from Japan; 70 from the United Arab Emirates; 65 from Vietnam; and 55 from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Interprovincial migration[edit]

Net cumulative interprovincial migration per Province from 1997 to 2017, as a share of population of each Provinces

From 1971 to 2012, Nova Scotia had a persistent negative trend in net interprovincial migration. Combined with a declining birth rate, this poses a significant demographic challenge for the province, as its population is projected to decline from 948,000 people in 2011 to 926,000 people in 2038. The destination for Nova Scotia migrants was most often Ontario, until the turn of the 21st century when Alberta became a more popular destination; New Brunswick ranks as a distant third.[19]

Interprovincial migration in Nova Scotia
In-migrants Out-migrants Net migration
2008–09 15,467 16,218 −751
2009–10 15,172 14,560 612
2010–11 14,553 14,594 −41
2011–12 14,410 17,276 −2,866
2012–13 12,630 16,147 −3,517
2013–14 13,402 15,973 −2,571
2014–15 13,854 16,165 −2,311
2015–16 15,107 14,353 754
2016–17 15,339 12,500 2,839
2017–18 15,509 12,461 3,048
2018–19 17,324 14,018 3,306

Source: Statistics Canada

Employment[edit]

As of February 2019, the unemployment rate for the province is 6.4 percent. Halifax Regional Municipality 4.9 percent [20]

Income[edit]

Median Household Income
By County By Community
Rank County 2011[21]
1 Halifax County $62,049
2 Hants County $60,186
3 Antigonish County $57,577
Nova Scotia $53,606
4 Inverness County $53,194
5 Kings County $51,850
6 Richmond County $50,745
7 Colchester County $50,568
8 Pictou County $50,417
9 Lunenburg County $48,154
10 Yarmouth County $47,676
11 Victoria County $47,413
12 Cape Breton County $47,224
13 Queens County $45,050
14 Shelburne County $44,267
15 Cumberland County $43,385
17 Annapolis County $43,522
17 Digby County $42,293
18 Guysborough County $42,063
Rank Community 2011[21]
1 Halifax Regional Municipality $62,069
2 Port Hawkesbury $61,013
Nova Scotia $53,606
3 Stewiacke $52,118
4 Mahone Bay $49,158
5 Wolfville $48,671
6 Hantsport $48,584
7 Clark's Harbour $48,102
8 Cape Breton Regional Municipality $47,830
9 Stellarton $46,307
10 Antigonish $45,538
11 Kentville $45,098
12 New Glasgow $44,942
13 Westville $44,647
14 Middleton $44,048
15 Annapolis Royal $43,956
16 Trenton $42,535
17 Pictou $41,905[A]
18 Truro $41,878
19 Windsor $41,859
20 Amherst $41,027
21 Bridgewater $40,049
22 Berwick $39,674
23 Lunenburg $39,529
24 Bridgetown $38,248[A]
25 Oxford $37,734[A]
26 Springhill $36,995[A]
27 Mulgrave $36,200
28 Canso $35,574
29 Shelburne $35,526
30 Yarmouth $34,572
31 Lockeport $33,854[A]
32 Digby $33,437
33 Parrsboro $27,472[A]

Notes[edit]

Gross domestic product[edit]

Nova Scotia GDP is presently approximately $33 billion (Can) annually.

See also[edit]

Demographics of Canada's provinces and territories

References[edit]

  1. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2017-02-08). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - Nova Scotia [Province] and Canada [Country]". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2019-09-26.
  2. ^ "Nova Scotia Population 2019". World Population Review.
  3. ^ Belshaw, John Douglas (2015). "10.2 Demographics". Canadian History: Pre-Confederation. BCCampus.
  4. ^ Canada's population Archived November 4, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. Statistics Canada. Last accessed September 28, 2006.
  5. ^ Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Nova Scotia) Archived 2006-11-21 at the Wayback Machine. Statistics Canada, 2005.
  6. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2017-02-08). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - Nova Scotia [Province] and Canada [Country]". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2019-09-26.
  7. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2017-02-08). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - Nova Scotia [Province] and Canada [Country]". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2019-09-26.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Nova Scotia)". Statistics Canada. December 18, 2012. Archived from the original on April 13, 2014. Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  9. ^ "Decision NSUARB-MB-10-2" (PDF). Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board. January 19, 2012. Retrieved January 29, 2013.[permanent dead link]
  10. ^ Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and population centres, 2011 and 2006 censuses: Nova Scotia Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine. Statistics Canada.
  11. ^ a b c d e "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and population centres, 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Nova Scotia)". Statistics Canada. February 20, 2019. Retrieved September 15, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "Census Profile, 2016 Census, Nova Scotiat". 12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-03-04. Retrieved 2017-03-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Community Profiles from the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada - Province/Territory
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-03-04. Retrieved 2017-03-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Aboriginal Population Profile from the 20062011Census, Statistics Canada - Province/Territory
  15. ^ Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "Statistics Canada: 2011 Census Profile". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Archived from the original on 2018-05-27.
  16. ^ Statistics Canada Archived 2014-10-26 at the Wayback Machine National Household Survey, for Province of Nova Scotia, 2011 census - 100% data
  17. ^ Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "Census Profile, 2016 Census, Nova Scotia". 12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  18. ^ Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "Census Profile, 2016 Census, Nova Scotia". 12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  19. ^ Rashti, Amir Ahmadi; Koops, Adrian; Covey, Spencer (Spring 2015). "The Effects of Capital on Interprovincial Migration: A Nova Scotia Focused Assessment". Dalhousie Journal of Interdisciplinary Management. 11: 28.
  20. ^ https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410028703. Missing or empty |title= (help) Unemployment rate
  21. ^ a b National Household Survey (NHS) Profile - Select from a List Archived 2014-05-12 at the Wayback Machine Statistics Canada