Ulmus 'Den Haag'

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Ulmus hybrid cultivar
Ulmus 'Den Haag'.jpg
'Den Haag', Preston Park, Brighton
Hybrid parentage U. pumila × 'Belgica'
Cultivar 'Den Haag'
Origin The Netherlands

The hybrid cultivar Ulmus 'Den Haag' is a Dutch development derived from a crossing of the Siberian Elm Ulmus pumila and the Belgian Elm Ulmus × hollandica 'Belgica' in 1936 by S. G. A. Doorenbos (1891-1980), Director of Public Parks in The Hague.[1]

Description[edit]

The tree is distinguished by its pendent branches, and its foliage, which is creamy-white on emergence but turning lime-green and ultimately deep green by midsummer.[2]

Pests and diseases[edit]

Although reputed to be moderately resistant to Dutch elm disease, drought, and frost, the tree has brittle branches, and is vulnerable to Coral-spot Fungus Nectria cinnabarina [3]

Cultivation[edit]

The tree remains in commerce in the Netherlands and New Zealand. 'Den Haag' is not known to have been introduced to North America.

Notable trees[edit]

The UK TROBI Champion grows at Preston Park in Brighton, measuring 14 m high by 77 cm d.b.h. in 2009. [4]

Etymology[edit]

The tree is named for the city of Den Haag (known as The Hague in English).

Synonymy[edit]

  • Ulmus 'Ieplaan': old (original?) name for Ulmus 'Den Haag'.
  • Ulmus pumila 'Den Haag': various authorities.

Accessions[edit]

Europe

Nurseries[edit]

Europe
Australasia

References[edit]

  1. ^ Santamour, Frank S.; Bentz, Susan E. (May 1995). "Updated Checklist of Elm (Ulmus) Cultivars for use in North America". Journal of Arboriculture. 21 (3): 122–131. Retrieved 20 June 2016. 
  2. ^ 'Den Haag' in Handbuch der Ulmengewächse, www. ulmen-handbuch.de
  3. ^ Heybroek, H. M. (1986). Tuin en Landschap, 8(12): 19, 1986
  4. ^ Johnson, O. (2011). Champion Trees of Britain & Ireland, p. 168. Kew Publishing, Kew, London. ISBN 9781842464526.
  5. ^ "List of plants in the {elm} collection". Brighton & Hove City Council. Retrieved 23 September 2016.