Deng Yingchao

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Deng Yingchao
Deng Yingchao with Zhou Enlai, 1954
Chairwoman of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference
In office
June 1983 – April 1988
Preceded by Deng Xiaoping
Succeeded by Li Xiannian
Second Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection
In office
22 December 1978 – 11 September 1982
Preceded by Post established
Succeeded by Huang Kecheng
Personal details
Born (1904-02-04)4 February 1904
Nanning, Guangxi, Qing Empire
Died 11 July 1992(1992-07-11) (aged 88)
Beijing, People's Republic of China
Nationality Chinese
Political party Communist Party of China
Spouse(s) Zhou Enlai
(m. 1925–76; his death)
Relations Sun Weishi (adopted daughter)
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Deng.

Deng Yingchao (simplified Chinese: 邓颖超; traditional Chinese: 鄧穎超; pinyin: Dèng Yǐngchāo) (February 4, 1904 – July 11, 1992) was the Chairwoman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference from 1983 to 1988, a member of the Communist Party of China, and the wife of the first Chinese Premier, Zhou Enlai.


With ancestry in Guangshan County (光山縣), Henan, she was born Deng Wenshu (鄧文淑) in Nanning, Guangxi. Growing up in a poverty-stricken family, her father died when she was at a young age and her single mother taught and practiced medicine. Deng studied at Beiyang Women's Normal School.[1] Deng participated as a team leader in the May Fourth Movement, where she met Zhou Enlai. They married on August 8, 1925 in Guangzhou. She was a legal witness in the wedding of Ho Chi Minh and Zeng Xueming in 1926.

Deng and Zhou had no children of their own. However, they adopted several orphans of "revolutionary martyrs", including Li Peng, later a Premier of the People's Republic of China. She promoted the abolition of foot binding imposed on women.

She died in Beijing at the age of 88.

There is a memorial hall dedicated to her and her husband in Tianjin (天津周恩來鄧穎超紀念館).


  1. ^ Lv Bicheng: Newspaper Woman, Educator and Buddhist, Frank Zhao, 13 January 2014, Women of China, retrieved 11 April 2014

External links[edit]

Honorary titles
Preceded by
Wife of the Premier of the People's Republic of China
Succeeded by
Han Zhijun
Political offices
Preceded by
Deng Xiaoping
Chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference
Succeeded by
Li Xiannian