Denis Murphy (Australian politician)

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Dr. Denis Murphy
Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly
for Stafford
In office
22 October 1983 – 21 June 1984
Preceded by Terry Gygar
Succeeded by Terry Gygar
Personal details
Born Denis Joseph Murphy
(1936-08-06)6 August 1936
Nambour, Queensland, Australia
Died 21 June 1984(1984-06-21) (aged 47)
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Resting place Mooloolah Cemetery
Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Labor Party
Spouse(s) Gwendoline May Butcher (m.1959)
Alma mater University of Queensland, Duke University
Occupation Academic, Historian, School teacher
Religion Roman Catholic

Dr. Denis Joseph Murphy (6 August 1936 in Nambour, Queensland – 21 June 1984), was an Australian Labor Party politician, historian and biographer.[1]

Murphy taught as an academic at the University of Queensland, writing extensively on the history of Labor in that state. Along with Peter Beattie, he was the leading figure in the push during the late 1970s to have the Queensland branch of the party reformed. After the success of the reform movement, and intervention from the party's federal headquarters, he became State Branch President.

He was elected to the Parliament of Queensland for the electorate of Stafford at the 1983 state election.[2]

Murphy completed biographies on a number of Queensland ALP figures, notably Thomas J. Ryan and Bill Hayden. He was working on a biography of Andrew Fisher before his death.

Murphy was diagnosed with cancer in 1983 and died in 1984, aged 47. He died before having the opportunity to make a speech as a Member of Parliament.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murphy, Denis Joseph (1936–1984)Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 22 February 2015.
  2. ^ "Former Members". Parliament of Queensland. 2015. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 

External links[edit]

  • [1] Denis Murphy display at the University of Queensland Library
Parliament of Queensland
Preceded by
Terry Gygar
Member for Stafford
1983–1984
Succeeded by
Terry Gygar