Denise Annetts

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Denise Annetts
Personal information
Full name Denise Audrey Annetts
Born (1964-01-30) 30 January 1964 (age 53)
Sydney
Batting Right-hand bat
Bowling Right-arm Leg spin
Role Batsman
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 109) 1 August 1987 v England
Last Test 19 February 1992 v England
ODI debut (cap 43) 7 February 1985 v New Zealand
Last ODI 29 July 1993 v New Zealand
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI
Matches 10 43
Runs scored 819 1126
Batting average 81.90 41.70
100s/50s 2/6 1/8
Top score 193 100*
Balls bowled 42 0
Wickets 0
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a
Best bowling 0/2
Catches/stumpings 12/– 23/–
Source: Cricinfo, 5 May 2014

Denise Audrey Annetts (born 30 January 1964, Sydney) (married name Denise Anderson[1]) is a former women's cricketer for New South Wales Breakers and Australia whose international playing career ran from 1985 until 1993. A right-handed batsman, Annetts scored centuries in both Tests and One Day Internationals.[2]

Career[edit]

Annetts first appeared for New South Wales in the 1983/84 season, and after a couple of low scores, she made her first half-century against Australian Capital Territory in her third match before being run out on 51.[3] Her following match brought another half century, improving slightly to 56 before being caught.[4] In January 1985 she was selected for the Women's Cricket Association of Australia President's XI to play the touring England side, and was subsequently named in the Australia team to face New Zealand the following month. She scored 26* on her One Day International debut as Australia chased down a low New Zealand total to win by nine wickets.[5]

Her maiden ODI half-century came the following season when she made 57 runs opening the batting with Belinda Haggett against New Zealand in Wellington.[6] Part of the 1987 Australia Women tour of the British Isles, Annetts scored her second half-century during the Third ODI against Ireland,[7] before making a century against Surrey Women, including a 184-second-wicket partnership with Lindsay Reeler, a portent of things to come.[8] She scored 36*[9] and 50[10] in the two ODIs followed by 34 on her Test debut, a match dominated by Haggett's 126.[11]

On her second Test appearance, Annetts came in to partner Lindsay Reeler with the score on 2/37 after Denise Emerson and Belinda Haggett had fallen early.[12] The pair put on a record wicket partnership for any wicket in Women's Test cricket history of 309 runs, with Annetts making her top score of 193, while Reeler finished on 110*.[12][13]

In January 1994, she claimed her omission from the Australian team was because she was not a lesbian. The Australian Anti-Discrimination Board could not investigate the complaint as the discrimination law only protected homosexuals.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Denise Audrey Annetts – CricketArchive". CricketArchive. Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "DA Annetts". Cricinfo. Retrieved 3 November 2009. 
  3. ^ "New South Wales Women v Australian Capital Territory Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  4. ^ "New South Wales Women v Victoria Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  5. ^ "Australia Women v New Zealand Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  6. ^ "New Zealand Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  7. ^ "Ireland Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  8. ^ "Surrey Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  9. ^ "England Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  10. ^ "England Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  11. ^ "England Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  12. ^ a b "England Women v Australia Women". CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  13. ^ "Records / Women's Test matches / Partnership records / Highest partnerships for any wicket". Cricinfo. Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  14. ^ "Australian cricketer's appeal falls on deaf ears". The Times. 18 January 1994. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 

External links[edit]