Denmark–Switzerland relations

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Denmark–Switzerland relations
Map indicating locations of Denmark and Switzerland

Denmark

Switzerland

Denmark–Switzerland relations refers to the current and historical relations between Denmark and Switzerland. Denmark has an embassy in Bern.[1] Switzerland has an embassy in Copenhagen, but only offers consular services from the Nordic Regional Consular Centre in Stockholm. [2] Diplomatic relations between Denmark and Switzerland were established in 1945.[3]

History[edit]

A treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Establishment between Denmark and Switzerland was signed on 10 February 1875.[4] The first treaty between Denmark and Switzerland was signed on 10 December 1827.[5] Another treaty was about conscription, signed on 10 February 1875.[6] Before 1945, Switzerland was represented in Denmark, through a consulate in Sweden, and a consulate general in Copenhagen. When diplomatic relations were established in 1945, Switzerland opened a legation in Copenhagen, and later an embassy.[3] On 22 June 1950, Denmark and Switzerland signed an agreement on air services.[7] On 21 May 1954, a convention on social insurance was signed.[8] A agreement on road transport was signed in 1989.[9] Switzerland also signed an agreement with Faroe Islands.[10]

Economic relations[edit]

Trade between Denmark and Switzerland is "developed".[11] Danish exports to Switzerland amounted to 4.6 billion DKK, and Swiss export to Denmark amounted to 5 billion DKK.[12][when?]

State visits[edit]

In September 2002, President of Switzerland Kaspar Villiger, visited Denmark and Anders Fogh Rasmussen. After the meeting, Fogh Rasmussen said "I have had a good and constructive discussion with the Swiss President".[13] In March 2008, Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Moeller visited Switzerland to meet Federal Councillor Micheline Calmy-Rey.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Government of Denmark. "Danish embassy in Bern, Switzerland". Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Denmark) (in Danish and German). Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  2. ^ Government of Switzerland. "Swiss embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark". Federal Department of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Bilateral relations between Denmark and Switzerland". Federal Department of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  4. ^ British and foreign state papers (66). Foreign Office of Great Britain. 1882. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  5. ^ Danske tractater. University of Minnesota: J. Jørgensen. 1874. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  6. ^ G.E.C. Gad (1883). Ugeskrift for retsvaesen. Oxford University. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  7. ^ "Agreement between Denmark and Switzerland relating to air services" (PDF). United Nations & International Civil Aviation Organization. United Nations Treaty Series. 22 June 1950. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  8. ^ "Convention concerning social insurance" (PDF). United Nations (in Danish, English, and French). United Nations Treaty Series. 21 May 1954. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  9. ^ "Agreement between the Swiss Federal Council and the Government of the Kingdom of Denmark concerning international road transport". United Nations. United Nations Treaty Series. 13 October 1989. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  10. ^ "Exchange of letters constituting an agreement for theapplication of the above-mentioned Agreement to the Faroe Islands,". United Nations. United Nations Treaty Series. 2 August 1978. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  11. ^ Government of Switzerland. "Economy and Trade between Denmark and Switzerland". Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  12. ^ Government of Denmark. "Foreign Affairs of Denmark: Switzerland" (in Danish). Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  13. ^ Government of Denmark (1 September 2002). "The President of the Swiss Confederation met with the Danish Prime and Finance Ministers". Ministry of Finance of Denmark. Ministry of Finance of Denmark. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  14. ^ Government of Switzerland. "Working visit by the danish Foreign Minister". Retrieved 19 February 2011. 

External links[edit]